National

Around the Nation
4:45 am
Thu November 22, 2012

High School Student Documents Sandy's Aftermath

Originally published on Thu November 22, 2012 4:51 am

Brandon McClain is a 17-year-old high school student who lives in one of the areas in New York City hit hardest by Superstorm Sandy. His neighborhood was without power for a long time after the storm and it seemed like help was slow in coming. So he decided to do a video documentary of his experiences.

Business
4:45 am
Thu November 22, 2012

Protesters To Picket Wal-Mart On Black Friday

Originally published on Thu November 22, 2012 4:51 am

Union-backed organizations plan to picket selected stores across the country, about 1,000 in all. Journalist Charles Fishman tells Linda Wertheimer the groups protesting want to make Wal-Mart a better company and a better place to work. Fishman is the author of the book, The Wal-Mart Effect.

Business
4:45 am
Thu November 22, 2012

More And More Airline Flights Are Filled To Capacity

Originally published on Thu November 22, 2012 4:52 am

Airlines are always crowded during the Thanksgiving holiday. But if you've had the feeling they're becoming more crowded all the time, it's not just your imagination. On average, more than 80 percent of airline seats have been filled and plenty of flights have been packed to capacity.

It's All Politics
6:19 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.'s Bad End Is Just The Latest For A Snake-Bit District

Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illinois, seen here in October 2011, resigned from Congress on Wednesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 7:20 pm

Talk about your snake-bitten congressional districts.

The Thanksgiving-eve news that Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. was resigning from Congress after reports that he has bipolar disorder and is the subject of a criminal probe of his spending of campaign funds, is just the latest in a series of bad endings for those who have represented Illinois' 2nd Congressional District in Washington.

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Shots - Health News
5:29 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

With Routine Mammograms, Some Breast Cancers May Be Overtreated

A mammographer prepares a screen-film mammography test for patient Alicia Maldonado at a hospital in Los Angeles.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 6:01 pm

The endless debate over routine mammograms is getting another kick from an analysis that sharply questions whether the test really does what it's supposed to.

Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, coauthor of the analysis of mammography's impact, which was just published in The New England Journal of Medicine, tell Shots that the aim was to "get down to a very basic question."

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Around the Nation
5:20 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Through Meditation, Veterans Relearn Compassion

Veterans participate in a therapy session at the Veterans Affairs center in Menlo Park, Calif.
VA Palo Alto Health Care System

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 6:52 pm

Marine Esteban Brojas is rocking back and forth in his chair in a rehabilitation center for veterans in Menlo Park, Calif. He rubs his hands together so quickly you can hear them.

"You know, you're going into a building, and you know there's a grenade being popped in there," he says, "and there's a woman and a child in there ... and you're part of that?"

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Shots - Health News
5:03 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

When Fetuses Yawn In The Womb

Could that be a yawn? An ultrasound scan catches an opened-mouth fetus.
Courtesy of A Little Insight 3D 4D Ultrasound.

Why people yawn is a mystery. But yawning starts in the womb.

Past studies have used ultrasound images to show fetuses yawning, but some scientists have argued that real yawns were getting confused with fetuses simply opening their mouths.

So Nadja Reissland, a researcher at the University of Durham in the United Kingdom, used a more detailed ultrasound technique to get images of fetal faces that could distinguish a true yawn from just an open mouth.

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Monkey See
5:01 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Rob Delaney Talks About Gratitude, Perspective, Spaceships And A Career With Teeth

A screenshot from Rob Delaney's standup special, "Live At The Bowery Ballroom."

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 5:57 pm

Full disclosure: The first thing I said when I saw that Rob Delaney would be talking to NPR's Audie Cornish on today's All Things Considered was that I was curious to see whether he had ever said anything on Twitter — where he has almost 670,000 followers (including me) as of this writing — that they thought they could read on the radio. It's an exaggeration. But not by that much.

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Sports
4:58 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

College Basketball Player Sets Record With 138 Points

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 5:57 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Last night, in a Division Three college basketball game, Grinnell College beat Faith Baptist 179 to 104. That is a piece of sports news we would not spend a second on, but for the individual performance of Grinnell's Jack Taylor. The 5-foot-10 inch guard scored 138 points. It's a new collegiate record and, for all we know, a new planetary record. Among the 108 shots he attempted, Taylor took 71 three-point shots and made 27 of them. And he joins us now.

Congratulations on setting this new record.

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Politics
4:58 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. Resigns Under A Cloud

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 5:57 pm

Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. resigned his seat in Illinois' 2nd District on Wednesday. He resigned in a letter to House Speaker John Boehner. Jackson had been on medical leave since June, being treated for bipolar disorder. David Schaper talks to Audie Cornish.

Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

'Squeezy The Pension Python' An Odd Allegory In Ill.

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 5:57 pm

Illinois is facing a massive pension problem with an estimated $96 billion unfunded liability for its public workers. The legislature has been unable to reach a plan to overhaul the pension system. So Governor Pat Quinn has unveiled a marketing strategy hoping to start a grassroots discussion on pension reform. The effort includes a video and a mascot, Squeezy the Pension Python. Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish tell us the snake is getting a mixed receptions from the people of Illinois.

StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
3:33 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Remembering A Father And Connecting Generations

Gary Knell with his father, David.
Courtesy of Gary Knell

David Knell was born on Nov. 23, 1916, in Youngstown, Ohio, the second son of immigrant families from Russia. Back then, Albert Einstein had just formulated his theory of relativity, the 40-hour workweek had just been created, and the hamburger had recently been invented.

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On Aging
3:24 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

LGBT Housing Helps Seniors Stay Connected

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the duo of Macklemore and Ryan Lewis is breaking down barriers in rap. They talk with us about their music and its message in just a few minutes.

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Religion
3:24 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Cartoonist On Sikh Superhero Who Fights Prejudice

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

We want to go now to a place where art and culture intersect. We've heard a lot about the shooting that took place at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin over the summer, and the questions and the soul-searching over that tragedy are still going on, both inside and outside the Sikh community. One man, though, says he has an idea to make the country a more tolerant place for Sikhs and everybody else, actually, and it comes in the form of comic strips.

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Shots - Health News
2:56 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

World AIDS Epidemic Slows, But Fight Stalls In Parts Of Asia

Students paste red ribbons on a window to mark World AIDS Day in Nanjing, China, in 2006. Between 2007 and 2011, the number of newly diagnosed HIV cases in China has nearly quadrupled to 40,000.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 3:10 pm

New HIV infections have dropped more than 50 percent across 25 developing countries since 2001, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS reported on Tuesday. And, transmission of the virus from mothers to infants has decreased by 24 percent in just the past two years.

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