National

Planet Money
3:37 am
Fri November 16, 2012

It's Legal To Sell Marijuana In Washington. But Try Telling That To A Bank.

David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 2:03 pm

Voters in Washington and Colorado just approved measures legalizing marijuana for recreational use. But businesses that want to sell marijuana in those states will face a problem: No bank wants to do business with them.

I called several banks in Washington. I called a local credit union, a tiny bank in the San Juan islands. Everybody said basically the same thing. Even if selling marijuana is legal under state law, it's still illegal under federal law. And banks and credit unions worry that this could get them in trouble.

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It's All Politics
5:46 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Geography, Not Gerrymandering, May Explain GOP's Hold On House

A man votes on Nov. 6 in Chicago.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 6:10 pm

Some Democrats complain that Republicans in recent decades have had the edge in House races because GOP state legislatures have been better at the gerrymandering game. Except that may not be true.

Some political experts believe there's an easier explanation, and perhaps a tougher one for Democrats to overcome: Voters supporting Republican House candidates, they say, are spread over more congressional districts than those who support Democrats. It's that simple. It's merely a matter of geography.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
5:30 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

In Sandy's Wake, A Reshaped Coastline

Sandy punched a hole in the barrier island that holds the affluent borough of Mantoloking, N.J., temporarily splitting the community in two. The storm also destroyed several multimillion-dollar homes and erased the island's protective system of dunes.
Doug Mills AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

New Jersey's most affluent community, Mantoloking, sits on a narrow barrier island 30 miles north of Long Beach. As Sandy approached, most of the residents fled inland. But Edwin C. O'Malley and his father, Edwin J. O'Malley Jr., hunkered down in their 130-year-old house.

They tied a boat to their porch and then watched the storm surge break over the dunes and flood the streets.

"Overnight that night, lying in bed, I could actually hear waves hitting the side of the house — which obviously made it more difficult to get to sleep," the younger O'Malley says.

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It's All Politics
5:03 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

As Dust Settles, Voters Cite Campaign's Negativity

Lynn Armstrong Coffin and Eric Papalini box with puppets depicting Mitt Romney and President Obama in Sarasota, Fla., in September.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:22 pm

Voters were frustrated by a 2012 presidential race they called more negative than usual and more devoid of substantive discussion of issues, according to a survey released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

And voters are pessimistic about the prospect of a more productive Congress, Pew found.

Two-thirds of registered voters surveyed after Election Day said they believe relations between Democrats and Republicans will stay the same or worsen over the coming year.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
5:02 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Some Sandy Victims Tied Up With Bureaucracy

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

President Obama visited New York today, touring sections of Queens and Staten Island that were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. He promised the federal government will help people rebuild and, more immediately, help restore necessities that many have done without for more than two weeks now.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: There's still a lot of cleanup to do. People still need emergency help. They still need heat. They still need power. They still need food. They still need shelter.

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Law
5:01 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

BP Agrees To Pay $4.5 Billion For Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Environment
5:01 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

BP Oil Spill Has Lingering Effects In Gulf Coast

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To understand what the environmental impact of the BP oil spill has been over the last two years, we turn now to Dr. Jim Cowan. He is a professor of oceanography and coastal science at Louisiana State University. Dr. Cowan, welcome to the program.

DR. JIM COWAN: Happy to be here.

CORNISH: So you've been out on the water examining the impacts of the spill since the early days. What were the sort of concerns at first and how has that changed over time?

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Politics
4:56 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Raising Revenues Or Taxes — What's The Difference?

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to dig into some of those policy differences now between Republicans and Democrats. When it comes to reducing the deficit, both sides insist it's time for compromise. But President Obama says tax cuts for the richest Americans must end.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: When it comes to the top two percent, what I'm not going to do is to extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it.

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National Security
4:52 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Panetta Calls For Military Ethics Review

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

That resignation of David Petraeus, a retired four-star general, has raised a fundamental question: Is something wrong with the top leadership of the military? For months now, one high-ranking officer after another has gotten into trouble on charges ranging from sexual misconduct to the misuse of government funds. So today, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta called for an ethics review of the senior officer corps. NPR's Tom Bowman has that story.

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Africa
4:52 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Congressional Hearings Focus On Benghazi Attack

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Three congressional hearings, two of them closed to the public, focused today on the September 11th attacks in Benghazi, Libya. Four Americans were killed in those attacks, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens. As NPR's David Welna reports, the only open hearing today on Benghazi turned into a political slugfest.

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Cheaper Fruits And Vegetables Alone Can't Save Food Deserts

Five days a week, the Peaches & Greens truck sells affordable fruits and vegetables to families on public assistance, people without a car, homebound seniors and even local workers who otherwise would grab fast food or candy for a snack.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:12 pm

Tens of millions of Americans can't follow the government's guidelines for healthful eating because they can't afford or access enough fresh fruits and vegetables. Sometimes it's because they live in what's known as a "food desert," places devoid of markets with a good variety of quality fresh foods.

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Environment
3:15 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Loophole Lets Toxic Oil Water Flow Over Indian Land

Dirty water from the oil wells flows through oil-caked pipes into a settling pit where trucks vacuum off the oil. A net covers the pit to keep out birds and other wildlife. Streams of this wastewater flow through the reservation and join natural creeks and rivers.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

The air reeks so strongly of rotten eggs that tribal leader Wes Martel hesitates to get out of the car at an oil field on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. He already has a headache from the fumes he smelled at another oil field.

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Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Sign Language: It's Not Just About The Hands

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:01 pm

After Superstorm Sandy, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter became a pop culture phenomenon. Lydia Callis' energy and facial expressions drew wide attention and even a spoof on "Saturday Night Live." Some members of the deaf community took offense to some reactions.

Law
2:05 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

BP Reaches Plea Agreement Over Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:17 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Law
2:05 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Busted: What Happens When Shoplifters Get Caught?

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:25 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. As the holidays get underway, retailers go on high alert against shoplifters. Cases spike at this time of the year, and they're expected to raise losses for the year to nearly $35 billion.

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