National

Election 2012
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

What Weird Things Could Happen On Election Day?

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a week that features Halloween is a good time to take a look at all the scary things that could happen when Election Day finally rolls around next Tuesday. NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson has been asking what else we could witness in this unpredictable campaign.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: The Romney campaign is predicting it will win. So is the Obama team. But what it both of them turn out to be wrong?

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Around the Nation
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Remembering Some Of The Lives Lost In Sandy

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We've been giving you the number of dead from Hurricane Sandy. More than 90 people have been killed by the storm. Over 40 of those deaths were in New York and many on Staten Island, across the harbor from Manhattan.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here are a couple of the stories behind the numbers. Glenda Moore(ph) tried to escape the water with her two sons, age two and four. The car stalled. She left her car with her boys, carrying a toddler, holding the older one's hand. Surging flood waters swept the boys away. The mother survived.

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Around the Nation
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Determined UPS Driver Makes It Through The Storm

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is rain or shine.

Many businesses in the New York area have not been able to reopen since Hurricane Sandy came through.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

But one UPS driver in New Jersey has kept his truck on the road, even braving the flooded streets of Hoboken, New Jersey - getting cheers from surprised and happy customers.

(LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: You're still working?

JOHN DONOWITZ: Am I going to see this on YouTube?

(LAUGHTER)

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Election 2012
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

N.Y., N.J. Scramble To Make Voting Possible

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Along with other post-Hurricane Sandy reconstruction, New York and New Jersey are trying to reassemble their election preparations. The storm affected hundreds of polling stations. Neither of these reliably Democratic states was poised to decide the presidential election, but public officials are still scrambling to make voting possible for millions of people in the evacuation zones. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports.

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Election 2012
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Obama Makes Final Push For Second Term

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President Obama is on the road, too, after spending time to focus on helping the Northeast recover from the massive storm called Sandy. A politician at the center of that storm is now backing the president. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has endorsed the president for reelection, saying he has the values and the vision to guide the country into the future, even though Bloomberg added he was disappointed with the past four years under President Obama.

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Around the Nation
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

In New Jersey, Restoring Electricity A Top Concern

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The recovery from Hurricane Sandy has more than one level to it. There's a long-term question: How to rebuild the region to make it more resilient in the next disaster? But before that comes a short-term crisis: millions of people still without electricity, some people who've been trapped in their homes for days, and a death toll of more than 90 people up and down the East Coast, mostly in New York and New Jersey.

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Around the Nation
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

In Michigan, A Contentious Battle Over A Bridge

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On Election Day next week, Michigan voters will face a question about international bridges and tunnels. It's really a question about one bridge in particularly - a long-planned and highly-contested connection between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario.

As Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reports, it's an electoral twist in a bitter struggle with Michigan's governor and Canada on one side, and a billionaire bridge owner on the other.

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Election 2012
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

In Tight Race, Black Voters Urged To Turn Out

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There's little doubt that President Obama will win a large majority of the minority vote. Polls this year show the Latino voters supporting him by large margins, and that could make the difference in some swing states. Of course, back in 2008, 95 percent of African-Americans voted for Barack Obama. The key in this election is to get those voters to actually cast their ballots, which is why the president is spending these last days of the campaign reaching out to African-Americans. Here's NPR's Cheryl Corley.

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Shots - Health News
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Romney's Baffling Claim About Medicare Pay Cuts For Doctors

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes his case about Medicare during a briefing in South Carolina in August.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:19 pm

Health care in general — and Medicare, in particular — have been big parts of this year's presidential campaign.

But over the last couple of weeks, Republican Mitt Romney has been making a new claim that doesn't quite clear the accuracy bar.

It has to do with $716 billion in Medicare reductions over 10 years included in the federal health law, the Affordable Care Act. And it's become a standard part of Romney's stump speech.

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Energy
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Fixing NYC's Underground Power Grid Is No Easy Task

Consolidated Edison workers try to repair damage near the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

The fury of the great storm Sandy shocked a lot of people, like John Miksad, vice president of the New York electric utility Consolidated Edison. "We hit 14-foot tides — that was the biggest surprise," he told a press conference this week. "The water just kept rising and rising and rising."

That rising water flooded streets, buildings and parts of the city's underground electricity grid. Hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers lost power. But it might have been worse if the power lines had not been underground.

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U.S.
5:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Ala. Racist Language Measure Draws Unexpected Foes

Alabama's Constitution still includes language referring to poll taxes and segregated schools. Voters are poised to decide on an amendment to excise the outdated lines, but some African-American leaders in the state are opposing the change.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:20 pm

State-mandated segregation is a thing of the past in Alabama, but the state's antiquated 1901 constitution paints a different picture. On Tuesday, Alabama voters will decide whether to strip language from the state's governing document that calls for poll taxes and separate schools for "white and colored."

In 2004, voters rejected an amendment to purge those remnants of Jim Crow from the constitution by fewer than 2,000 votes.

'We've Got To Move Forward'

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

How Obama And Romney Differ On Climate Change

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Climate change was a big part of the announcement Mayor Bloomberg made yesterday endorsing President Obama for reelection.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bloomberg owns a media company, is politically independent, and made his endorsement in a memorable way. He said Mitt Romney has taken sensible positions in the past but reversed course on all of them.

MONTAGNE: He also said President Obama's term has been disappointing. But he argued the president was better on a range of issues, especially climate change.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Romney Back On The Attack In Virginia

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday - we've made it to Friday - it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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It's All Politics
6:42 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

In Key Senate Races, Outside Groups Outpace Candidates' Ad Spending

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (right), D-Ohio, debates his Republican challenger, Ohio state Treasurer Josh Mandel, at the City Club in Cleveland on Oct. 15.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 7:52 pm

Most of the attention heading into Election Day may be on the presidential race, but the stakes are also high in the battle for the U.S. Senate, where there are close contests in about a dozen states.

According to an NPR analysis of Kantar Media CMAG data, outside groups are spending more than $100 million blanketing the airwaves. This won't come as a surprise if you live in a state with a competitive Senate race.

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U.S.
5:35 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Manhattan Businesses Struggle Until Power Returns

Paul Nicaj, who owns Battery Gardens Restaurant on the southern tip of Manhattan, says Superstorm Sandy will cost him a few hundred thousand dollars, including income from two weddings that may have to be cancelled this weekend.
Ailsa Chang NPR

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:01 pm

Lower Manhattan continues to slog through another day without electricity, and it's taking a toll on businesses that have been shuttered since the storm hit. No electricity means no lights, no credit card machines, no heating and no refrigerators to keep food fresh, so local shops and restaurants are waiting desperately for the power to turn back on.

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