National

Economy
6:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

A Tale Of Two Cities: Too Many Jobs, Or Not Enough

Agriculture is a key job sector in Yuma, Ariz., where the seasonal workforce and migrant labor tend to boost the unemployment rate.
Jacob Lopez AP

Maria Arvizu continues to fill out job applications even though she has yet to deposit her last paycheck.

Arvizu, 53, relocated to Yuma, Ariz., to become a bus driver for the local school district last year. After school closed for summer break, she was caught off guard when she was laid off. She had expected to get another driving assignment and was denied collecting unemployment because she was still considered a school employee.

"I just keep looking for a job," Arvizu says.

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Energy
5:46 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Miners Weather The Slow Burn Of Coal's Demise

Equipment for transporting and housing coal sits idle in Cowen, W.Va. Since the natural gas boom, several mines in Webster County have either slowed or shut down operation, laying off hundreds of workers.
Guy Raz NPR

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 8:21 pm

At some point today, you will probably flip on a light switch. That simple action connects you to the oldest and most plentiful source of American electricity: coal.

Since the early 1880s — when Edison and Tesla pioneered the distribution of electrical power into our homes — most of that power has come from the process of burning coal.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Pennsylvania Cuts Medicaid Coverage For Dental Care

Marcia Esters hopes charity will pay for dental work that Medicaid used to cover.
Erika Beras

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 7:41 am

Marcia Esters needs crowns fused to six of her bottom teeth and new dentures. But because of changes made to Medicaid in Pennsylvania, she now has to pay for it all herself.

"It's thousands of dollars' worth of work that I cannot afford," she says.

Esters also uses a wheelchair. Because she couldn't get get her teeth fixed, she has spent the last few months eating pureed food and avoiding people.

"I don't go anywhere unless I have to," she says. "If you could look or feel halfway decent, it just helps, it really does."

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Two Governors, Two Approaches To Solvency

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 7:21 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

This weekend, governors from around the country are convening in Williamsburg, Virginia, for their annual meeting. The convention is happening at a time when most states are struggling to balance budgets and close deficits. In many cases, that's meant cutbacks.

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Challenges Ahead For Oregon's Health Exchanges

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 7:21 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

As Governor Deal just mentioned, Georgia is still undecided over whether it will participate in Medicaid expansion. That's part of the Affordable Care Act.

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Around the Nation
7:54 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Black Lung Makes A Deadly Resurgence

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 4:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Earlier this week, NPR and the Center for Public Integrity reported astonishing news: the coal miners' disease called black lung is a growing problem again. The investigative report also showed that weak regulation and industry deception has thwarted the effort to protect miners from the coal mine dust that causes black lung.

NPR's Howard Berkes joins us. Howard, thanks for being with us. first,

HOWARD BERKES, BYLINE: It's good to be with you, Scott.

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Presidential Race
7:54 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Obama On The Stump In Virginia

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 4:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As Mitt Romney defends his business record, President Barack Obama is on the campaign trail. He'll be in the suburbs of Richmond, Virginia and Washington, D.C. today. Yesterday, the president traveled to the Tidewater region of southeastern Virginia, and he continued to make his pitch that he is the best champion for the middle class. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Science
7:54 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Starry-Eyed In Arizona Observe The Heavens

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 4:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There may be no better town in America for observing the heavens than Tucson, Arizona. It has low humidity, high elevation and a darkened desert. That part of the state has attracted quite a few astronomers, both professional and amateur. We sent NPR's Peter Breslow to Tucson to seek out this community of stargazers.

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Politics
5:57 am
Sat July 14, 2012

'Exhaustion' Can Signify A Lot More Than 'Tired'

The office of U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. initially said he had gone into seclusion for exhaustion. Later, that was revised to a mood disorder.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

We may never know all the reasons why Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., has dropped out of sight, but history teaches us that if a public figure is linked to "exhaustion," the word can be code for something more problematic than simply being tired.

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Around the Nation
5:49 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Honor Delayed: WWII Vet Layed To Rest Decades Late

Staff Sgt. John Hogan was killed during World War II. Though he died almost 70 years ago, Hogan is only now going to be buried at Arlington Cemetery.
Courtesy of Ed Hogan

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 12:38 pm

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. John Hogan was killed in action. But not recently, and not in Afghanistan. He was a young gunner on a bombing mission during World War II when his B-17 was shot down over Germany.

Now, 70 years later, Hogan will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

Back in 1944, the small, tight-knit town of West Plains, Mo., was knocked to its knees when one of its brightest and most promising young men went missing overseas.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:09 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

Governors Spar Over Medicaid And Health Exchanges

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell says Medicaid should be overhauled before it's expanded.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:24 pm

The nation's governors — well, many of them, anyway — are gathering in Colonial Williamsburg, Va., for their annual summer meeting this weekend.

It's no easy trick for the National Governors Association to get Republican and Democratic chief executives on the same page, or even the same room.

This year, in the wake of the Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act, it's even harder.

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Governing
5:01 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

D.C. Mayor Under Fire For Unreported Campaign Cash

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. Here in Washington, D.C., the city government has been enveloped by a series of scandals and federal investigations this year. Two city council members have resigned after pleading guilty to bank fraud and embezzlement. And now, there are calls for the mayor, Vincent Gray, to quit too. Three of Gray's campaign associates have pleaded guilty to various crimes. Here's Patrick Madden of member station WAMU.

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Pop Culture
4:59 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

More Women Than Ever At San Diego's Comic-Con

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Comic-Con, the big annual entertainment convention in San Diego, is well under way. The gathering is known for its devoted fans, often dressed in costumes, and its showcase of mostly science fiction and fantasy.

The convention has a reputation as a magnet for geeks, but in recent years, Comic-Con has become more mainstream and, dare we say, kind of cool. Here to give us the lowdown on what's going on this year is NPR's Nina Gregory, who joins me now from San Diego.

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Television
4:55 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

'American Idol' Judging Desk Down Two Seats

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The most popular series on television is in tumult. In the last couple of days, two of the three judges on "American Idol" have quit. Watching the judges criticize the singers and each other is a big part of Idol's appeal. NPR's Neda Ulaby reports without Steven Tyler and Jennifer Lopez, "American Idol" is seriously short on star power.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: Today's drama began with a phone call.

RYAN SEACREST: Jennifer?

JENNIFER LOPEZ: Hi.

SEACREST: Hi, it's Ryan.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

What's Killing 'King Coal' In West Virginia?

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This week, one of the biggest coal mining companies in Central Appalachia, Patriot Coal, filed for bankruptcy protection. Over the past three months, a wave of layoffs has hit coal country hard, and this past month, the share of all U.S. electricity generated from coal hit its lowest level since the 1940s. Our colleague Guy Raz visited Webster County in the middle of West Virginia to find out what's killing King Coal.

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