National

The Salt
4:44 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Some Athletes Reject High-Tech Sports Fuel In Favor Of Real Food

Some athletes are choosing water and real food instead of sports drinks and processed bars and gels.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 12:22 pm

As the world's greatest athletes gear up for the 2012 Olympic Games in London this month, viewers like us are likely to see a spike in televised ads for sports drinks, nutritional bars, and energy gel — that goop that so many runners and cyclists suck from foil pouches.

Powerade, in fact, is the official sports drink of the 2012 Olympics, and if it's true what these kinds of ads imply, processed sports foods and neon-colored drinks are the stuff that gold medalists are made of.

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Medical Treatments
4:44 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Tissue Donation A Growing Billion Dollar Business

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:22 pm

Audie Cornish has more about an upcoming series on human tissue donation.

Economy
4:09 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Call Me Maybe When Your School Loan Is Paid In Full

Some young adults say their student loan debt affects their dating and marriage potential. A few have had partners break up with them over debt, while other couples forge ahead, but keep finances separate and avoid legal marriage.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 5:12 pm

The increasing debt load of college graduates has affected young people's lives in untold ways, from career choices to living arrangements. Now add another impact on a key part of young adult life: dating and marriage.

Rachel Bingham, an art teacher in Portland, Maine, learned this a few years back, when a guy broke it off after four months of a budding relationship. Among other reasons, he cited her $80,000 in student loan debt.

"He said it scared him," she recalls, "that it really made him anxious. And he just did not want to take on my responsibility."

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Planet Money
3:02 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

What Americans Earn

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:29 pm

With all the talk about what to do with the Bush tax cuts — and whether they should be extended for no one, everyone, or everyone under a certain income cutoff — we thought it made sense to check in on how much Americans actually make.

Roughly $50,000. That's how much the median households makes in income and benefits per year. In other words, half of American households made less than $50,000 and half made more.

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The Salt
2:53 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Coney: The Hot Dog That Fed Detroit's American Dream

Patrons pack in at American Coney in this undated photo. 1942
Courtesy Grace Keros

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 12:18 pm

Take a hot dog from New York's famed Coney Island, throw in plenty of Greek immigrants and a booming auto industry, add some chili sauce, a steamed bun, chopped onions, mustard and an epic sibling rivalry and you've got the makings of a classic American melting pot story.

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Health
1:58 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Plugging In For A Better Night's Sleep

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 2:46 pm

High-tech gadgets, like smartphones, keep us connected at all hours and are making it more difficult to get a good night's sleep. But several new smartphone apps claim to help users sleep better. New York Times health and fitness reporter Anahad O'Connor explains the science behind apps.

Law
1:58 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Should Ex-Felons Have The Right To Vote?

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:15 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden in Washington. In a year where a tight presidential race could be determined by a few swing states, the issue of who is allowed to vote could turn the election, which is why recent moves in Florida and Iowa are getting so much attention.

Bucking a larger trend, these two states are making it harder for former felons to vote. This comes as a number of other states in recent years have made the process easier.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:39 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

FDA Approves First Drug To Prevent HIV Infection

Dr. Lisa Sterman holds up a Truvada pill at her office in San Francisco in May. Even before the Food and Drug Administration's approval, Sterman had prescribed Truvada for about a dozen patients at high risk for developing AIDS.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 2:57 pm

The Food and Drug Administration has given the first OK for a drug to prevent HIV infection.

The daily pill Truvada, made by Gilead Sciences, combines two medicines that inhibit the reproduction of HIV. It's been a mainstay in the treatment of HIV/AIDS for years, and as of today is an approved option for reducing the risk of HIV infection for people at high risk.

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Planet Money
1:25 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Rethinking Free Tuition, College May Risk Reputation

Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City.
Library of Congress

Our show on Friday told the cautionary tale of the Red Cross, and how it earned the lasting suspicion of World War II veterans when it temporarily charged for once-free doughnuts.

Uri Simonsohn, a University of Pennsylvania business professor, chalked it up to "categorical change" — and the sense of betrayal veterans felt when they saw a fundamental shift in the very nature of their relationship with the Red Cross.

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Music Interviews
11:48 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Gospel Singer Regina Belle Reaches 'Higher'

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. For nearly 25 years, Grammy award-winning singer/songwriter Regina Belle has been wowing audiences with her powerful voice. Much of that recognition has been for her work in R&B, but in 2008, after an award-winning career in secular music, Regina Belle went back to her roots and released her first gospel album, "Love Forever Shines."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LOVE FOREVER SHINES")

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Television
11:09 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Aaron Sorkin: The Writer Behind 'The Newsroom'

Aaron Sorkin's work includes A Few Good Men, The American President, The West Wing, Sports Night, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Charlie Wilson's War and The Social Network.
HBO

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 12:16 pm

Aaron Sorkin's new HBO drama The Newsroom follows the inner workings of a fictional cable network trying to challenge America's hyperpartisan 24/7 news culture. It's a typical Sorkin drama, complete with fast-paced dialogue, witty scenes and a strong ensemble cast.

So why a newsroom?

"It suits my style," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "I like writing about heroes [who] don't wear capes or disguises. You feel like, 'Gee, this looks like the real world and feels like the real world — why can't that be the real world?' "

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Florida A&M President's Resignation To Be Effective Immediately

James Ammons in 2006.
Gerry Broome AP

Instead of staying on until his retirement in October, it was reported this morning that Florida A&M University President James Ammons' resignation will be effective immediately.

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Around the Nation
7:31 am
Mon July 16, 2012

90 Year Old Celebrates Birthday On A Roller Coaster

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renée Montagne. Former President George H. W. Bush says when he turns 90 he'll celebrate by skydiving. Thrill seeking at 90 is becoming a trend. Thelma Gratch spent her 90th, presumably with arms raised, hurtling down a 230-foot high roller coaster at 80 miles an hour. She's had a season pass to an amusement park outside Cincinnati since 1979 so chances are she's spent other birthdays screaming her head off. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:15 am
Mon July 16, 2012

'Chain Reaction' Statue In Need Of Repair

The late Paul Conrad's 1991 work "Chain Reaction" is a mass of black chain link shaped into a mushroom cloud. It's in Santa Monica, Calif., where people either love or hate it. Now the end of the world has been delayed long enough for the statue to decay.

Around the Nation
4:58 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Montana Extends Wolf Hunting Season

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Montana is making it easier to hunt wolves. The wolf population has been growing even though wolf hunting is already legal. So wildlife officials are doing away with the statewide kill limit. They are nearly doubling the length of the season and the state will also allow trapping, which many conservationists call inhumane. Here's Dan Boyce with Montana Public Radio.

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