National

NPR Story
12:03 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Enter an Optical Illusion

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 1:45 pm

Artist Julian Hoeber's "Demon Hill," now on view at the Harris Lieberman Gallery in New York City, is modelled after a roadside attraction called a "gravitational mystery spot" — where water runs uphill and gravity doesn't behave as expected. Science Friday talked to cognitive scientist Michael Landy about what happens to our perceptual system inside the exhibition.

Election 2012
11:58 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Biden Debate Coach On VP's Performance

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, President Obama honored late labor and civil rights leader Cesar Chavez earlier this week but a new book questions whether the full story of his life and legacy isn't perhaps more complicated. That's in a moment.

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U.S.
11:56 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Casinos Not An Easy Bet For Local Governments

The MGM Grand Detroit is one of three resort casinos that have opened in the city since 1999.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

More states and cities are turning to casinos to generate revenue and plug budget holes.

The latest to try its luck is Maryland, where groups are waging an expensive campaign over a ballot question that will be put to voters next month. Proponents promise jackpots of jobs and funding for public schools, but analysts say the gamble doesn't always pay off at the levels promised for public coffers.

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Author Interviews
10:45 am
Fri October 12, 2012

The Man Who Tracks Viruses Before They Spread

H1N1 virus virons appear in a tissue sample.

C. Goldsmith and D. Rollin CDC Public Health Image Library

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:53 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 11, 2011. The Viral Storm will be published in paperback on Oct. 16.

The New Yorker once called virologist Nathan Wolfe "the world's most prominent virus hunter." Wolfe, the director of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative, spends his days tracking emerging infectious diseases before they turn into deadly pandemics.

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The Picture Show
10:11 am
Fri October 12, 2012

'Vintage Black Glamour' Exposes Little-Known Cultural History

That's Bananas: "Whether [Josephine Baker's] getting a pedicure or she's walking down the street or she's relaxing in a yard somewhere, I just love the variety of pictures of her," Gainer says. "The banana skirt is a part of who she was, it's the most famous thing, but it just annoys me when that's just the only thing. ... There was a lot more to her than that."
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:03 pm

I was scrolling through my Tumblr feed a year or so ago, when I saw a photo of Joyce Bryant. The caption said she was once dubbed the "black Marilyn Monroe" and was mentioned many times in Walter Winchell's gossip column.

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The Salt
8:48 am
Fri October 12, 2012

The Secret To Genius? It Might Be More Chocolate

A Swiss cardiologist plots a cheeky graph that shows a country's chocolate consumption may predict its chances of winning a Nobel.
John Loo Flickr.com

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:13 pm

Nerds, rejoice! It's Nobel season — the Oscars for lab rats, peacemakers and cognoscenti alike. Every fall, big thinkers around the world wait for a middle-of-the-night phone call from Sweden, dreaming of what they might do with the $1.2 million prize.

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Around the Nation
7:06 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Endeavor Makes Its Way To Its New Home

Originally published on Sat October 13, 2012 4:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The space shuttle Endeavor is on the road this morning here in L.A., traveling the streets from the airport to its new home at the California Science Center. Four hundred curbside trees were cut down so its massive wings could pass by. Hundreds of metal plates laid down to protect underground utilities from the shuttle's weight. And dozens of traffic signals removed to accommodate its height. Even for L.A., an epic commute. This is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:23 am
Fri October 12, 2012

No. 2s, Biden, Ryan, Square Off In Combative Debate

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Last night's vice presidential debate offered a reminder about American politics. It can be infuriating, misleading and irrelevant, but at its best politics becomes a spectacle - a highly informative show - which is what the vice presidential candidates delivered last night in a debate in Kentucky.

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Health
4:23 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Patients Worry Meningitis Symptoms Could Be Dormant For Months

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:36 am

Federal health authorities says the number of people infected with meningitis has risen again. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 14 people have died and 170 people have been infected. Thousands of people received the infected steroid shots and are awaiting news whether they will develop meningitis.

Around the Nation
4:23 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Native American Tribe's Battle Over Beer Brews

On the south side of Whiteclay, Neb., a crowd gathers outside one of the town's four liquor stores.
Hilary Stohs-Krause NET News

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 10:26 am

Anheuser-Busch, Pabst and MillerCoors are among the big beer makers the Oglala Sioux tribe has accused of illegally selling millions of cans of beer each year in Whiteclay, Neb. The town borders Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, which is located across the state line in South Dakota and is dry.

The Oglala Sioux's federal case was thrown out, and the tribe is considering what to do next — legalize alcohol or go to state court.

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StoryCorps
4:23 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Veteran: Risks In 1950s Bomb Test 'A Disgrace'

The Priscilla event, part of Operation Plumbbob conducted at the Nevada Test Site in 1957, was a 37-kiloton device exploded from a balloon.
U.S. Department of Energy

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:36 am

In 1957, Joel Healy witnessed one of the largest nuclear tests ever conducted on U.S. soil.

Healy was in the U.S. Army, stationed in the Nevada desert north of Las Vegas at Camp Desert Rock. He was 17 years old and a private first class at the time.

Healy drove dump trucks, moved materials, and built structures, like houses, that would be destroyed by the explosions so the Army could study the effects of a nuclear blast. He also helped build the towers where many of the bombs were detonated.

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Election 2012
4:23 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Fact-Checking The Vice Presidential Debate

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:39 am

A team of NPR correspondents joins Renee Montagne to give Thursday night's vice presidential debate a "Close Read." The discussion will take up the foreign and domestic issues covered in the debate with analysis and fact checking. Reporters include: John Ydstie, Julie Rovner, Michele Kelemen, Larry Abramson and Tom Bowman.

It's All Politics
12:35 am
Fri October 12, 2012

5 Takeaways From The Vice Presidential Debate

Vice President Biden and his Republican opponent, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, participate in the vice presidential debate at Centre College in Danville, Ky., Thursday.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Wed October 17, 2012 9:07 am

Neither candidate let his opponent get away with much of anything during the vice presidential debate Thursday night.

The tabletop discussion between Vice President Biden and Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin showcased their clear differences over policy. The two disagreed about nearly every issue that came up, whether it was military posture, tax policy or abortion.

Many of these differences were expressed in negative, sometimes surprisingly personal terms.

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It's All Politics
12:34 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Media Circus: Who Won? The Moderator

Vice President Joe Biden speaks as Republican Rep. Paul Ryan and moderator Martha Raddatz listen during the vice presidential debate at Centre College on Thursday in Danville, Ky.
Michael Reynolds Pool/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:51 pm

Atmospherically, the vice presidential debate pitted old versus new. Vice President Joe Biden lives in a world where no lily goes ungilded, and every 'lative is super. Rep. Paul Ryan speeds through campaigning energetically, like the heroic train in the new movie Atlas Got Cut Using the P90X Workout.

And the moderator Martha Raddatz? She came out guns blazing. No avuncular, passive Jim Lehrer she.

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It's All Politics
12:15 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Debate Decision: A Family Still Divided In Swing State Ohio

Tom Barnes
Liz Halloran NPR

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:51 pm

Tom Barnes is a 70-year-old retired grain farmer born in Ohio. He's the son of a school teacher turned farmer, and now himself the father of four, grandpa of eight.

It's clear that he adores his daughter, Becky Barnes, 30, and takes pride in describing how she's taken a piece of the big family farm south of Columbus and turned it into an organic vegetable operation by dint of hard work and sheer determination.

"It's an amazing project out there," he says. What he says distresses him, however, are her political leanings.

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