National

Ask Me Another
9:15 am
Fri May 25, 2012

The Gregory Brothers: The Masters of the Internet

The Gregory Brothers: Andrew Rose Gregory (left), Evan Gregory, Sarah Fullen-Gregory and Michael Gregory.
Denny Renshaw. Courtesy of the Gregory Brothers

Originally published on Fri December 21, 2012 3:21 pm

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Around the Nation
7:26 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Cows Get Their Drink On After Crashing Party

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A Memorial Day weekend combines honoring those who served with backyard barbecues. And some are getting an early start. Police in Boxford, Massachusetts responded to a call about six party crashers - cows. The Tri-Town Transcript reports the cows crashed a backyard gathering, chased away partiers, and drank their beer. Said a police sergeant, the thirsty cows, quote, "just went in and helped themselves." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
6:16 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Brooklyn Bridge Celebrates 129 Years

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now let's raise a toast to a bridge that once claimed the title of longest suspension bridge in the world. That was the Brooklyn Bridge, which opened 129 years ago yesterday. With a span of 1,500 feet, it featured two carriage ways, two railway lines, and a lane that pedestrians could use at the cost of one penny.

Around the Nation
5:09 am
Fri May 25, 2012

In Ariz. Contest, A Debate Over Government's Reach

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:22 am

Voters in southern Arizona's 8th Congressional District are deciding who will fill the seat formerly held by Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. The Democrat resigned in January, a year after she was badly injured by a gunman at a district event in Tucson.

Giffords' resignation set in motion a special election to serve out the rest of her two-year term. Giffords' former district director, Ron Barber, won the Democratic nomination uncontested. Jesse Kelly easily beat three opponents in the Republican primary.

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Around the Nation
5:09 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Whirlpool Bets Golf Course Will Help Mich. Town's Economy

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Benton Harbor, Michigan is hosting the Senior PGA Championship, though the economically troubled city may seem like an unlikely place to hold a golf tournament. Benton Harbor is currently in receivership. And it is home to the Whirlpool Corporation, which has moved much of its manufacturing and jobs out of town and overseas. As Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports, Whirlpool executives are hoping the golf tournament will give the town an economic boost.

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Your Money
4:25 am
Fri May 25, 2012

In Tight Credit Market, A Tool For Small Businesses

Many small-business owners have had difficulty securing loans in recent years. One website grades the nation's banks by the ratio of small-business loans to deposits — and finds that community banks are often most friendly to small business.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

When small-business owners start looking for money to expand, they often begin at a big bank. The banks are highly visible, well-known and often nearby.

But many small-business owners report that they have struggled to get loans in the wake of the economic downturn.

Ami Kassar, CEO of the small-business-loan broker multifunding.com, advises business owners that large banks are "not the best place to start" when looking for a small-business loan.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:51 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Dispatchers' CPR Coaching Saves Lives When Every Minute Counts

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her son Ryan when she passed out. Her husband performed CPR for six minutes with the help of a dispatcher before medics arrived.
Courtesy of Medic One Foundation

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Your chances of surviving a sudden heart attack may depend on where you live; some American cities have survival rates five times higher than others. One difference can be 911 dispatchers.

If they coach someone over the phone to give CPR, the chance of surviving goes up. There's now a push to make it universal, but some cities are slow to implement the necessary training.

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her fourth child when she collapsed against the bathroom door. It was January 2011 in the Seattle suburb of Woodinville.

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Around the Nation
3:50 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Walk This Way: Crossing The Golden Gate Bridge

More than 200,000 people crossed the bridge the day it opened in 1937. Many walked. Others ran, tap-danced, roller-skated, unicycled, or strode on stilts.
Courtesy of GoldenGateBridge.org

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 2:15 pm

On May 27, 1937, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened, connecting bustling San Francisco to sleepy Marin County to the north. The Oakland-Bay Bridge had opened six months earlier — but the Golden Gate was an engineering triumph. It straddles the Golden Gate Strait, the passage from the Pacific Ocean into the San Francisco Bay, where rough currents prevail and winds can reach 70 mph.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:48 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Need A Nurse? You May Have To Wait

Some fear that with rising medical costs and an aging population, the country's nursing staff will be stretched too thin.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:15 pm

Nurses are the backbone of the hospital — just ask pretty much any doctor or patient. But a new poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds 34 percent of patients hospitalized for at least one night in the past year said "nurses weren't available when needed or didn't respond quickly to requests for help."

Since nurses provide most of the patient care in hospitals, we were surprised at the findings. We wanted to find out more. We wanted to know what was going on from nurses themselves. So we put a call-out on Facebook.

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StoryCorps
3:29 am
Fri May 25, 2012

The Day Taps Echoed Through Belgium's Hills

After Harrison Wright was drafted into the U.S. Army as a teenager in 1943, he became a bugler.
Courtesy of Harrison Wright

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

During World War II, Harrison Wright served with the Army in Europe. And as he recalls during a visit to StoryCorps with his grandson Sean Guess, he was sent on a very special assignment to mark the end of the war.

Wright was drafted in March 1943.

"I was an 18-year-old boy," he says. "I blew the bugle in our outfit," he adds, largely because he had played the trumpet in high school.

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Law
7:28 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Suspect Arrested In Etan Patz Kidnapping Case

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In New York City, a decades old missing child case may have been solved. In 1979, a 6-year-old boy named Etan Patz disappeared as he was walking to school. Thirty-three years later, almost to the day, police say they have a suspect under arrest and his confession. That suspect is Pedro Hernandez, now 51 years old.

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Law
7:20 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

The Face That Changed The Search For Missing Kids

Etan Patz on the "lost child" poster issued after his 1979 disappearance.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 4:31 pm

Etan Patz's disappearance haunted his family for decades. The arrest Thursday of a man who reportedly confessed to killing the 6-year-old back in 1979 may finally end their uncertainty.

There's no doubt, though, about the impact his abduction had nationally: It changed the way society and the legal system respond to missing children.

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All Tech Considered
5:57 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Friend Your Students? New York City Schools Say No

New York City's Department of Education issued its first guidelines this spring for how teachers should navigate social media.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

English teacher Eleanor Terry started a Facebook page last fall for the High School for Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Brooklyn. She uses it for the school's college office to remind seniors about things like application deadlines. The seniors use it to stay in touch with each other.

"There was a student who got into the University of Chicago," she says, "and the way we found out about it was that they scanned their acceptance letter and then tagged us in it."

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Religion
4:52 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Pa. Monsignor On Trial For Covering Up Sex Abuse

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Monsignor William Lynn, the highest ranking Catholic official to be criminally tried for covering up child sex abuse by priests, faced fierce questioning in a Philadelphia courtroom on Thursday. Lynn handled the sex abuse claims when he was secretary for clergy for more than a decade.

Shots - Health Blog
4:01 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

What's Up, Doc? When You're Doctor Rushes Like The Road Runner

Patients continue to complain that physicians don't spend enough time examining and talking with them.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

To physician Larry Shore of My Health Medical Group in San Francisco, it's no surprise that patients give doctors low marks for time and attention.

"There's some data to suggest that the average patient gets to speak for between 12 and 15 seconds before the physician interrupts them," Shore says. "And that makes you feel like the person is not listening."

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