nutrition

Science Cafe: A Closer Look At Sugar

Jul 20, 2015

Our Science Café tackles sugar: the average American now eats about 130 pounds of sugar every year. It’s in everything from tomato sauce to milk. But what exactly is sugar? And how does it affect our bodies?

This show was originally broadcast on March 17, 2015.

GUESTS:

NHPR Staff Photo

Summer is fast approaching, and for children from low-income families, that means an end to the free or reduced price lunches they get in school.

Wednesday, the state Department of Education and the USDA kicked off the annual Summer Meals Program.

Last year, the program fed more than 300,000 meals to children across the Granite State, and organizers expect that number to grow this summer.

Cheri White, administrator for the state Department of Education’s Bureau of Nutrition, joined Morning Edition to talk about the program.

The First Decade: Children's Nutrition

May 19, 2015
USDA / Flickr/CC

While New Hampshire has the nation’s lowest official poverty rate, malnourishment is an issue for many low income kids.  And with many short and long-term consequences of poor nutrition in children, the stakes are high. We’re looking at why some kids don’t get enough healthy food, the impacts on their developing brains and bodies,  and some efforts to address this.

Nottingham Trent University via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/f3kvmU

Sports nutrition is a multi-billion dollar market, but a new study from the University Of Montana is calling so-called recovery foods into question. On today’s show we’ll look at the evidence on whether post-workout energy food and drinks any better for you than fast food.

Then, doctors typically diagnose diseases with blood tests, x-rays, scans, pokes and prods. Later in the show we’ll look at a powerful and prevalent diagnostic tool that’s been used to identify diseases for centuries: the nose.

Anna Armstrong / Flickr/CC

Food trends come and go: in the eighties, the enemy was fat; in the nineties, carbs; and now, it’s gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley that millions of Americans are giving up.

About a decade ago, Marion Nestle made waves when she published her groundbreaking book “Food Politics,” now considered by many to be one of the founding documents of the movement to reform the American food system.   In it, Nestle criticized the high quality, low quantity eating habits encouraged by the food industry and how many lawmakers in Washington have been influenced by the deep pockets of big agriculture and big food.

Cheryl Senter

Kids Culinary Arts teaches kids cooking and nutrition during after school programs, vacations and summer camps. The organization works in school districts and towns to get kids cooking and eating healthy foods. Matthew and Nicole Heiter, 11 and nine years old, have become experienced hands in the kitchen. Their mother, Lauren credits Kids Culinary Arts.

Courtesy Ars Technica

Imagine a world where eating and preparing food was a thing of the past. Sounds like the stuff of science fiction, right? Well, that world might be closer than we think. A new product, Soylent, claims to provide the body with all the nutrients it needs. The creator of Soylent sees it as not only a solution to the inefficiency of producing and preparing food, but potentially the world’s hunger problems.

Lee Hutchinson is senior reviews editor at Ars Technica. He lived on Soylent for a full week, and blogged about the experience.

Cheryl Senter

Kids Culinary Arts teaches kids cooking and nutrition during after school programs, vacations and summer camps. The organization works in school districts and towns to get kids cooking and eating healthy foods. Matthew and Nicole Heiter, 11 and nine years old, have become experienced hands in the kitchen. Their mother, Lauren credits Kids Culinary Arts.

School Lunch Gets the Chef Treatment

Sep 5, 2012
Elaine Grant for NHPR

If packing a lunch is a bit too daunting, never fear, at least not if you're the parent of a Souhegan High School Student. As part of our series Shifting the Balance, Elaine Grant got the skinny on their new, chef-inspired lunch program. (Check out the menu!)

WIC Increases Income Eligibility

Jun 12, 2012

New poverty guidelines issued by the federal government have expanded eligibility for the WIC Nutrition Program.

Thiamine mononitrate, disodium inosinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride.

Why are these hard-to-pronounce ingredients added to everything from a burger served in schools to veggie burgers in the frozen food aisle of the grocery store? We try to answer that on this edition of Tiny Desk Kitchen.

It turns out the answers are as varied as the ingredients. But as we yearn to know what's in our food and how it's made, these kinds of ingredients with unfamiliar names make people suspicious.

Bacon has been called the gateway meat, luring vegetarians back to meat. And hot dogs are a staple at many a backyard BBQ.

But a new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine finds that daily consumption of red meat — particularly processed meat — may be riskier than carnivores realize.

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/instantvantage/6108039196/" target="_blank">Instant Vantage</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

You may recall that as President, Ronald Reagan labeled ketchup as a vegetable. On Monday, a joint House-Senate spending bill added tomato paste slathered on pizza to the vegetable group. In fact, pizza is now designated as a “supervegetable”. Julian Pecquet covers health care for The Hill and has been following the bill, and the lobbying effort behind it.

We can't help but wonder what Michelle said when she found out.