Overheard

On today's show:

  • A conversation with Matthew Crawford about his book The World Beyond Your Head.
  • The Memory Palace - Family Snapshot. Listen to this segment again at prx.org.
  • Charlotte Perkins is a Senior at Kearsarge Regional High School and the New Hampshire State Champion of Poetry Out Loud. She's competing at the National Championships at the end of the month and Virginia spoke to Charlotte and her mother Beth about the experience.
  • Overheard - A weird new video game, a mystery on a mountain, a band you should check out, and Tracy Morgan reads his own audio book. 

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On today's show:

3.7.17: The Nuclear Codes & Overheard

Mar 7, 2017
Public Domain

On today's show:

Andrew Malone via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4uix3a
Somayeh Pakar

The Trump administration has vowed to roll back Obama's laws, but what does that mean for Title IX? On today’s show, we'll consider the future for the amendment now linking college and university funding to how they respond to sexual harassment and assault on campus.

Then, it can take months, even years, to plan a wedding...now imagine you have to do everything twice. Later in the show, a look inside gender segregated weddings in Iran, and how the single sex parties are boosting opportunities for creative women in the workforce.

Plus our semi-regular segment Overheard introduces you to sounds we think you need to hear.

Joe Plocki via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/Dgd7R

California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had "most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African". Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites...and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations.  Today, how Asian Americans became a "model minority."

Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can't help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.

Crossett Library via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8NwLSn

When foreign nationals commit a crime in the US, their consulates work to avoid what the majority of UN member states consider to be barbaric: execution. Today, we'll hear what the government south of the border is doing to their nationals off death row.

11.22.16: Hi, Anxiety, A #NoDAPL Map, & Overheard

Nov 22, 2016
Takuya Goro via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/jjTdDi

Feeling anxious or worried is part of being human, but for those suffering from an anxiety disorder, even tackling mundane tasks can be debilitating...and isolating. Today, a look at the condition affecting an estimated 25 million Americans, generalized anxiety disorder, and how to manage it.

Plus, mapping DAPL - as clashes between law enforcement and protestors erupt near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, a new map offers new perspective on a long-running dispute.

Onasill ~ Bill Badzo via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/84Dbc7

The BBC's list of the top 100 movies since 2000 included a lot of foreign and art house films, with hardly a blockbuster in the bunch. The internet peanut gallery was not pleased. Has anyone even seen these movies besides movie critics, they cried? Today, movie critic Ty Burr talks about the chasm between film buffs and mainstream movie goers.

Then, as we bid a fond farewell to August, it's time to catch up on worthwhile summer movies before the leaves  turn. The Hippo's Amy Diaz runs through a few you and the kids don't want to miss.

Jonathan Yeap via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/8tqUkG

By the time the 2016 Olympic opening ceremony kicks off in Rio, ranking rounds for one of the fastest growing sports will already have taken place--archery, not known for its high drama. On today’s show, Zen and the art of Olympic archery.

Then, a few days ago the AP news service blew the top off of a story that's been brewing for a while now. Despite what decades worth of guilt and dental advice might make you think, flossing might not actually be doing much for those pearly whites.

And for this month’s edition of Overheard, we invited NHPR reporter Emily Corwin and Senior Editor for Politics and Public Policy, Dan Barrick to share what they’re listening to.

Sadie Hernandez via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7v6aV8

Here at Word of Mouth, we spend a lot of time researching, recording, and listening to wonderful – and sometimes weird – audio. Today, a new installment of “Overheard.” This time we pull in some NHPR colleagues to share some of the best examples of sound the internet has to offer – some healthy curiosity required.

Then, a Pokebattle for the ages. Two teams duke it out over whether Pokémon go helps or hinders the experience of being in the natural world – and tussle over who has the right to decide that.  

Phillip LeConte via flickr Creative COmmons / https://flic.kr/p/9ECTMu

Cell phones, commercials, social media - wherever you are, whatever you're doing - something else is trying to get your attention.

On today’s show an author and motorcycle mechanic on why not everything can be engaging. And how overcoming boredom and mastering focus are essential skills in the age of distractibility.

Then, a segment composed almost entirely of our own distractions here at Word of Mouth - for our monthly installment of Overheard - a curated collection of online ephemera that's just about guaranteed to get you to Google while you listen.

Dennis Jarvis via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7jeDS3

Recent public health crises like Ebola and Zika show how fear grabs public and media's attention. But there's another virus potentially be more harmful on a mass scale that's crept under the radar. Today, we'll hear about a virus that's killing off Tilapia by the millions - and what that could mean for our global food supply.

Then, Vladimir Lenin died in 1924 - but you wouldn't know that by looking at his exquisitely preserved corpse. So what's the secret?

Overheard: March Edition

Mar 11, 2016

Amid the barrage of “best of” lists at the end of last year, the Word of Mouth team shared some of our favorite audio of 2015.

The list included moments from comedy podcasts, multi-media websites, and public radio programs.

We had such a blast doing that, that we thought we'd expand that a bit and share bits of lost and found sound available online each month.