Parenting

TQUIMBY

Back-to-school season means new notebooks, pencils, and pens, and for at least one very lucky kid – a brand-spanking new lunchbox.  J.M.

Oude School via Flickr Creative Commons

Parents of girls dread the moment when freckles and flats first make way for lipstick and heels - when soon-to-be-teen girls start flirting with adult styles and sensibilities.  A new study reveals there’s one activity that might help shelter young girls from the cultural rite of sexualization for a few more years… ballet. 

Boys and Ballet via Flickr Creative Commons

We’ve recently noticed a trend of all-boys ballet classes popping up in dance schools, including the Southern New Hampshire Dance Theater in Bedford. Word of Mouth Senior Producer Rebecca Lavoie, herself the mother of two boys, wanted to find out more about all-boys ballet, so she reached out to that school’s artistic director, Patricia Lavoie (just coincidence…no relation) for more on their all-boys ballet program, and the trend of these classes popping up all over the country.

(Photo by rodab0B via Flickr Creative Commons)

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Kasey Mathews seemed to have a perfect life. Terrific husband, a place in the suburbs, an adorable son with another baby on the way.

Her nicely placed plans for a second child went awry when her daughter, Andie, was born at just 25 weeks, weighing under just under 2 pounds. The traumatic birth launched her family into an emotional and logistical wringer through surgeries and scares that did not end when her tiny baby came home.

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Photo Credit jennymatlock, via blogspot

Produced with Emma Ruddock

There are plenty of pop culture references to the dangers of a close mother-son relationship. From the myth of Oedipus to the movie Psycho, narrative after narrative harps on the idea that mothers can damage their sons, make them weak, awkward and dependent.

But for millions of men, the opposite has turned out to be true, author Kate Lombardi tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. Lombardi — a mother herself — is the author of the new book, The Mama's Boy Myth: Why Keeping Our Sons Close Makes Them Stronger.

NHPR Staff

Do indigent parents have a constitutional right to a lawyer when the state charges that parent with abuse or neglect of their child?

That’s the question put to the state’s top court.

Last year, lawmakers passed a historic budget – making cuts to General Fund spending for the first time since World War II.

One of the casualties....the $1.2 million dollars provided to indigent parents for legal representation in child abuse and neglect proceedings.

Over the past several years, 350-400 parents a year are charged, typically for neglect.

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