Peter Bragdon

State Senator Peter Bragdon says he's stepping down from the Senate next month.

This comes as the Milford Republican has been reappointed to lead the Health Trust for another two years.

Bragdon took the job with the former Local Government Center in August.

He stepped down as Senate president in September to avoid what he described as the appearance of a conflict of interest, but stayed on as a state Senator.

He says doing both jobs in the short-term was possible, but long-term, it was impractical.

NHPR Staff

The complaints, all stemming from former Senate President Peter Bragdon's hire by the former Local Government Center (LGC), were brought by Concord Democrat Rick Watrous.

The committee made short work of most of them -- dismissing charges that Senator Bragdon knew he was being hired to help the LGC because of  his position in the Senate, that he used his status to get his job, and that appointed fellow Senator Jeannie Forrester to a committee studying the LGC to curry favor with his future employer.

Sate of New Hampshire

Senate President Peter Bragdon is stepping down from his post, saying it’s the right thing to do after taking a position as executive director of the Local Government Center.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

It's called Organization Day at the Statehouse - it's the day lawmakers are sworn in, leaders are elected, and, as they say, the future is yet unwritten.

NHPR's political reporter Josh Rogers joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson with more on the House and Senate leaders and whether their calls for a new tone in the legislature were comments on the previous legislative session.

The leaders appointed by the newly elected state Legislature Wednesday are familiar faces.

A minor bill to make technical corrections to the budget has caused a rift between Senate and House Republican leadership. The Senate President says the House’s actions yesterday will cost taxpayers several million dollars.

On Wednesday House lawmakers approved a bill that reduces the number of people of eligible for welfare assistance.

The change would save the state about a half a million dollars a month.

The Senate was on board with that move.

But then the House added a completely unrelated amendment, which puts the bill in limbo.