PFOA

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The United States Supreme Court has rejected ExxonMobil’s appeal of a $236 million verdict in a case brought against the oil company by the state of New Hampshire.

The legal battle began more than a decade ago when the state Attorney General sued 22 oil companies for using a chemical called MtBE, which can contaminate soil and drinking water.

Richard Head was an Associate Attorney General at the time and now works for SL Environmental Law Group, which worked with the state on the suit. He spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

 

New Hampshire officials say they've found a potentially cancer-causing chemical in Merrimack's former landfill but cannot say whether it has contaminated nearby private wells.

The announcement Tuesday is the latest evidence the chemical PFOA is more widespread in New Hampshire than initially thought. The chemical was first found in more than 50 wells in towns surrounding the Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility in Merrimack and has since been found in 11 private wells near a former manufacturing site in Amherst.

Daniel Orth/Flickr / http://bit.ly/1SZl4Pj

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services officials say residents of roughly 400 homes affected by PFOA contamination may need to drink bottled water all summer.

NHDES Website

  The state says residents who have questions or concerns about PFOA exposure can call a public inquiry line starting today. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

  A top Environmental Protection Agency official says her office will soon release new information about a potential cancer-causing chemical that has been found in drinking water in two New Hampshire towns.

Flickr/Håkan Dahlström

With concern growing about the chemical known as PFOA contaminating drinking water systems in southern New Hampshire, residents are now looking for ways to test their own water.

State environmental officials are testing private wells near the Saint-Gobain plastics plant in Merrimack, but many outside that one-mile radius want to know if their water is safe to drink.

It turns out, however, there are no labs here in New Hampshire that test for the chemical, which some studies have linked to certain types of cancer.

Steven Depolo/Flickr

Distribution of bottled water continues Monday for residents of Merrimack and Litchfield whose wells may be contaminated with the chemical known as PFOA.

The state is offering a month’s worth of water to all 400 homeowners within a one-mile radius of the Saint-Gobain Plastics Plants in Merrimack.

State environmental officials say the plant is the likely source of high levels of PFOA that’s been found in nearby wells.

Distribution of water began Sunday, and continues Monday at the Litchfield Transfer Station between noon and 7 p.m.

Ceyhun (Jay) Isik / https://flic.kr/p/cG7qFL

In recent weeks, confusion and unease have increased in several New Hampshire towns where contamination with the chemical PFOA has been detected in private wells.

Though the EPA has yet to determine a safe level of PFOA in drinking water, Sarah Pillsbury, the administrator for public drinking water with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is hoping that's about to change. 

Emily Corwin

Residents of Litchfield grilled a panel from the Department of Environmental Services Thursday night with questions about water contamination in their town.

This was round two in a series of public information sessions after the contaminant PFOA was found in groundwater surrounding the Saint-Gobain plastics plant in Merrimack. 

Two weeks ago, DES told residents they would get free bottled water only if their wells tested over 100 parts per trillion of this contaminant.

Gloconda Beekman / Flickr/CC

After the Flint, Michigan water crisis, many around the country started taking a closer look their own water systems. And with a recent contamination scare in southern New Hampshire by the chemical PFOA  - the concerns have become local.  We'll look at the state's sources for drinking water, and the challenges to delivering it free from contaminants.

 

A manufacturer is "potentially responsible" for the cleanup in New Hampshire communities where elevated levels of the chemical used to make Teflon coatings were found in wells and drinking water, the state Environmental Services Department says.

A department letter to Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, dated Friday, came after the department found over 20 wells within a 1-mile radius of the Merrimack plant had higher levels of the chemical PFOA.

Via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7MMKBg

 

New Hampshire's Environmental Services Department says a manufacturer is "potentially responsible" for the cleanup of an area that has shown elevated levels of the chemical PFOA in wells and drinking water.

The department's letter to Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics dated Friday came after it found 20 wells within a one-mile radius of the Merrimack facility showing higher levels of the chemical, used to make Teflon coatings.

Saint-Gobain found the presence of PFOA in its drinking water earlier this year and notified the DES.

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced Wednesday that the state is going to extend the range of water testing as results continue to come in showing widespread contamination around the former Chemfab plant in North Bennington.

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