Photography

pluckytree via Flickr Creative Commons

While the world’s top athletes compete at the  London 2012 Olympics, hundreds of photographers are contending to capture the game’s defining moments on camera.  To maximize its odds of snapping a winning pic, Reuters is getting some help, from robots.  The new shutter-bots will be stationed at Table Tennis, Boxing, Taekwondo, Judo, Fencing, Weight Lifting, and at the main Olympic Park for some of the big events.  Word of Mouth Producer Taylor Quimby caught up with Patrick Cain, a freelance reporter for th

Tanja Hollander

Produced with Zach Nugent

Castle in Naples by Annmarie Timmins

Fabulous photos?… There’s an app for that. In fact there are lots and lots and it seems like everybody’s got ‘em. Adam Bronkhorst  has some tips to transform your tossed off smartphone snapshots into expressive, vibrant photos worthy of keeping, printing, and showing off. Adam Bronkhorst is a professional portrait photographer based in the UK.

Emma Ruddock

Produced with Emma Ruddock

In early May, Word of Mouth Brought you the story about Jake Jones and Andrew Kenney, two New York photographers who are traveling across the country by car. Fueled by their Kickstarter supporters, they are documenting their trip by sending postcards of their photography from each state to those who contributed funds. After receiving our first couple of postcards, Jake and Andrew stopped by our studio on their way through New Hampshire to give us an update on the status of their travels. 

Peter Abdu

In December Fish and Game announced that for the first time they had captured photographs of Canadian Lynx alive in Northern New Hampshire. The photographer that snapped those pictures was an amateur biologist and student at UNH, named Peter Abdu.

 Five years ago, the New York Times moved into a gleaming new office tower in mid-town Manhattan. The shimmering structure by Starchitect Renzo Piano was commended for being green and digital-ready. Half a block away, the paper’s archives could not be more dissimilar. The sub-sub-basement -- affectionately known as the Morgue --  is cramped with hundreds of cabinets, stuffed with twelve million clippings and more than six million photographs from the paper’s 160-year history.

Photo by Andrew Kenney

Jake Jones and Andrew Kenney are New York photographers heading out for the open road in June. They’ll send an original, freshly photographed, newly minted postcard to anyone who helps fund their trip on Kickstarter. The cost: 2 dollars per postcard, per state.

A Washington, D.C.-area collector and his family have donated more than 1,000 Civil War photographs to the Library of Congress. But you won't find the men in these photos in history books — they're enlisted soldiers, and most of them are unidentified.

In one striking photo, the man depicted has crazy sideburns, a steady expression, and very clear eyes — maybe gray, or perhaps blue. He holds a rifled musket at his side. He is a Union soldier in the Civil War. And the only things we know about him are what we can learn from a single photo.

In our series, New Hampshire’s Immigration Story, we’ve talked about how immigrants and refugees have affected New Hampshire’s economy, health care system, law enforcement, schools, now we look at art. Last year photographer Mary Catherine Jones began an ongoing photo series called “New Faces New Hampshire” featuring portraits and images of refugees and immigrants in Manchester. She joined NHPR’s Brady Carlson to talk about her photo series.

You can view some of the photos here.

Just when you thought you had the latest in camera technology, along comes something new and shiny and ... rectangular.

It's called the Lytro, and it uses something called "light field technology." In short: You shoot now and focus later.

NPR's resident photo expert, Keith Jenkins, explains: In a nutshell, he says, this camera captures not only the color and the intensity of light — which is what normal cameras do — but also the direction of that light — from every possible angle.

Still confused? We are, too.

If you head to Yosemite National Park this time of year and stop by Horsetail Fall at just the right time, you might see something spectacular: As the sun sinks low in the sky, the waterfall glows with streaks of gold and yellow — and it looks just like molten lava.

Photographers like Michael Frye flock to the park every February to try to capture the phenomenon. Frye, author of The Photographer's Guide to Yosemite, describes the sight to NPR's Audie Cornish.

It's not like it hasn't been done before; it has. The problem is, it is so easy now, anyone can do it, and we'd never know because the tools are so subtle. I'm talking about doctored pictures — manipulating images, or what simpler folks call "lying." There used to be a saying on the Web: "Pictures, or it didn't happen." No more.

Photo by urbanmkr, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: "Ready for Liftoff: 3...2...None?"

When Kodak filed for Chapter 11 last week, it appeared that digital photography had put the lens cap on old-school film for good. Maybe not. Consider Polaroid: after ceasing production of its iconic Instamatic film in 2009, a group of devoted shutterbugs launched the impossible project. They took control of the company’s manufacturing equipment, and in March of 2010 began selling film.

Last week, rock photographer Barry Feinstein died.

While the name might not ring a bell, he shot the cover of Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A Changing" and Janis Joplin's "Pearl," and countless others.

His photographs, as well as works from other famous and not-so-famous rock photographers, are on display at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester.

The exhibit captures some of Rock and Roll’s biggest icons.

The photos aren’t posed promo shots, but intimate off-stage photos rarely seen by the public.

Pages