Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Today marked Governor John Lynch's last State of the State address. And, as one might expect during a slow trudge toward recovery, the bulk of Lynch focused either directly or indirectly on the economy.

NHPR brings you live NPR coverage Tuesday night from the Florida primary.

Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish will host live coverage, which will begin at 8 p.m., when the last polls close, and run until 10 p.m.

Coverage will feature candidate speeches, interviews, and expert analysis from NPR Contributors E.J. Dionne (The Washington Post) and Matthew Continetti (The Weekly Standard), along with polling insights from The Pew Center’s Andrew Kohut.  We’ll also hear from NPR’s Mara Liasson and Ron Elving.

Gov. John Lynch gives his final state of the state address to the House and Senate. Read the transcript of the  live tweets from the Statehouse below:

 

NHPRNews NHPR News 

That's all for our live coverage! Check with NHPR and NHPR.orgthis afternoon for more coverage and analysis. #nhsots

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

Education

New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch told lawmakers of the need for a constitutional amendment for education funding during his state of the state address.

He says the state needs more flexibility to direct more aid to communities and children with the greatest need.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

State of the State Address - Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Opening

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Senate President, Madam Chief Justice and members of the judiciary, honorable members of the Executive Council, House and Senate, and my fellow citizens of New Hampshire:

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Gov. Lynch will deliver his final state of the state address to the House and Senate on Tuesday, Jan 31.  He announced in September of 2011 that he would not seek a fifth term.

NHPR and NHPR.org will carry this speech live from the Statehouse at 11 a.m.

White House Brings Manufacturing Pitch to NH

Jan 26, 2012

The White House is on the road to win public support for its economic policies.  President Obama was in Iowa and Arizona yesterday.  Today, Vice President Biden visited a manufacturing plant in Rochester. The vice president described what the administration means when it says it wants to give everyone a fair shot at the American dream.

Vice President Biden spoke at Albany Engineered Composites, a company that has been expanding on the Seacoast.  That trend fit well with one of Biden’s roles, that of cheer leader for the productivity of American workers.

As the New Hampshire legislature begins whittling down a bevy of economy-related bills, we thought it would be helpful to offer you a brief, on-going roundup of what we believe are some key economic issues the General Court will be looking at, and why. We've also included resources if you'd like to research and track these issues on your own, or get in touch with the governor or your legislator.

Biden Presses for Manufacturing Jobs

Jan 26, 2012

Vice President Joe Biden visited a Rochester manufacturing plant to tout the administration’s economic policies.  Biden was upbeat, saying America is in the best position to continue to be the dominant economic power in the 21st century.

Speaking at Albany Engineered Composites, the vice president said the country should change tax law to reward companies that bring jobs home from overseas operations.

The big story of the day is, of course, President Obama's State of the Union address last night. Since the speech wrapped, analysis from politicos, pundits, and wonks has been pretty much non-stop.

Tonight, President Obama is set to deliver the final state of the union address of his first term. Morning Edition's Renee Montagne spoke to White House Senior Adviser David Plouffe for a preview of the president's speech.

After Newt Gingrich's bravura performance in the final South Carolina debate and his drubbing of Mitt Romney on primary day, the former speaker's challenge in Monday night's debate in Tampa, Fla., was to maintain if not increase his momentum eight days before the Florida Republican presidential primary.

Meanwhile, Romney's challenge was to give his supporters who were shell-shocked by the Palmetto State results reasons to believe he had it in him to turn it around, to stand to do what needed to be done to beat Gingrich in Florida.

In releasing details of his tax burden for the past two years, Mitt Romney offered a small window into a vast wealth. The tax records show that the former Massachusetts governor made $42.6 million over the past two years and because most of it came from capital gains, he paid $6.2 million in taxes.

That means that in 2010, his tax rate was 13.9 percent, and in 2011, it's expected to be 15.4 percent, lower than many Americans who pay taxes on wages.

Photo by David Thyberg, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Sweden is trying something new these days. Each week, the Swedish government’s twitter account, “At Sweden,” is being handed over to a Swedish citizen. And for seven days, that person can say anything they want to the account’s 25,000 plus followers. The government calls it “the world’s most democratic twitter account.” J.

In the race for the Republican presidential nomination, the tally stands at 1-1-1. Over the weekend, former House speaker Newt Gingrich re-established himself as a presidential contender with a resounding victory in South Carolina's primary.

He beat second-place finisher former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney by more than 12 points. That means Romney, Gingrich and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum have each won a nominating contest. Now all eyes are on Florida.

Romney Will Release Tax Records On Tuesday

Jan 23, 2012

Aiming to reset the narrative after Saturday's bruising loss in South Carolina, Mitt Romney said he would release his 2010 tax returns on Tuesday. The former Massachusetts governor made the commitment last night in an interview with Fox News.

By embracing Newt Gingrich in its primary, the South Carolina GOP has risked its remarkable record of success at picking the party's eventual nominee for president.

It's been quite a run. Beginning with its primary in 1980, when it chose Ronald Reagan, South Carolina has voted first among Southern states. And the Palmetto State's choice has gone on to dominate the other Southern states and lock up the nomination in short order. That happened eight times in a row, counting incumbent renominations.

Newt Gingrich's win in South Carolina was big enough to ensure that the Republican primary season will remain competitive for weeks to come.

But even in the immediate aftermath of the former House speaker's 12 percentage point victory over Mitt Romney, analysts were asking whether Gingrich's newfound momentum would be enough to sustain a serious challenge.

Herman Cain suspended his bid for the GOP presidential nominee back in December, but that's not stopping him from picking up votes in South Carolina's primary.

Could his mini surge of one percent of the vote be thanks to a late-breaking endorsement by Comedy Central comedian Stephen Colbert?

Most of the candidates in the GOP primary race have given their primary night speeches following South Carolina's primary Saturday.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich won the state's primary.

PBS NewsHour will be posting video of all of the candidates' speeches here.

For the record:

As our live blog has reported, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich won today's Republican presidential primary in South Carolina.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appears to have finished second.

In third: former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

That puts Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) in fourth.

So the race continues, with Florida's Jan. 31 primary as the next major contest.

Newt Gingrich has beaten Mitt Romney in South Carolina. The question now becomes whether he can pull off that trick enough times in enough states to deny Romney the Republican presidential nomination.

It was a big win for Gingrich, the former House speaker, who took 40 percent of the vote, compared to 28 percent for Romney, a former Massachusetts governor.

graphic: npr

NHPR brings you live NPR coverage Saturday night from the South Carolina Primary.

Rick Santorum is officially the winner of the Jan. 3 Iowa Republican presidential caucus. The state Republican Party reversed itself from a previous assertion that it would not declare one, given problems at eight precincts, as The Des Moines Register reported.

In a news release late Friday, the party said it called the race "in order to clarify conflicting reports and to affirm the results released Jan. 18 by the Republican Party of Iowa."

Carolina Blues: N.C. GOP Looks South With Envy

Jan 21, 2012

South Carolina voters have a pivotal role Saturday in narrowing the field of Republican presidential candidates.

But after that, South Carolina will get very little political attention. It's solidly Republican and simply not worth the time or money of Democratic presidential hopefuls.

North Carolina, on the other hand, could go either way, and the Obama campaign is already digging in. The Charlotte region straddles both states and leads a sort of "double life" in politics.

Too Far North

The New Hampshire House has passed its redistricting plan. Below are three maps to help  you see what's proposed and how it's different from today's voting districts.

  • The first map shows the proposed House districts, including the "floaterials" which appear as green overlays on the map
  • The second is the proposed districts without the floterials, colored by the number of representatives which would be elected from each district.
  • The third is the previous districts, color coded in the same way.

New Districts with Floterials New Districts without FloterialsPrevious Districts

 

(This post was retopped with the latest news at 9:35 a.m ET.)

The first-in-the-nation Iowa Republican presidential caucuses produced no clear winner, the Iowa Republican Party has confirmed.

While its recanvassing of the nearly 1,774 precincts where ballots were cast on Jan. 3 has put former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum 34 votes ahead of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney — a reversal of what we thought were their finishes — the party says it can't definitively say who won because it can't find the results from eight of the precincts.

(This post was retopped with the latest news at 11:18 a.m. ET.)

Saying that "there is no viable path forward for me," Texas Gov. Rick Perry just confirmed that he is leaving the 2012 race for the Republican presidential nomination.

Then, he went on to endorse the bid of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich — just two days before South Carolina Republicans go to the polls in a primary that could either cement former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's lead in the race for the GOP nomination or give new life to someone else's; perhaps Gingrich's.

 The Stop Online Piracy Act now in front of Congress – and its Senate counterpart bill, the Protect IP Act, or PIPA, are both stirring up vigorous debates in political, media and  IT circles.

In South Carolina, the race to be the conservative alternative to Mitt Romney is hitting a fever pitch. The state is seen by many as the last stop before inevitability in the GOP primary.

In campaign stops Tuesday, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich laid out what sounded like an ultimatum.

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