Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Crystal Paradis

Actor and writer Lena Dunham and retired U.S. women’s soccer star Abby Wambach began two days of campaigning for Hillary Clinton on Friday. They join Bill and Chelsea Clinton, Al Franken, and other celebrities crisscrossing the state these days on Clinton’s behalf.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Brady Carlson hosts this run-down on the latest in Primary politics, including behind-the-scenes stories from reporters, tales and trends from the trail, and "only in New Hampshire" moments the rest of the country is missing out on.

On our first podcast of the primary, we look at the week's avalanche of political ads. Then, two seasoned primary watchers weigh in on the celebrities (and non-celebrities) candidates call upon in the primary's waning weeks. Finally, a public radio host who's interviewed hundreds of primary candidates shares her strategy to get them to open up.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Depending how you look at it, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s campaign is going either very well, or quite poorly. His campaign has more endorsements in New Hampshire than any other candidate; yet his polling remains quite low. And on the campaign trail, Rand Paul’s mind often seems to be somewhere else.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio is pledging to undo each of President Obama’s executive orders, including his most recent actions aimed at curbing gun violence.

Speaking at a town hall meeting in Nashua Thursday, the Florida Senator said the president’s focus should instead be on enforcing existing gun laws.

"As opposed to try to add new ones that are only going to inconvenience law-abiding people because they're the only ones who are going to follow the law," Rubio said. 

Stuart Isett/Fortune Most Powerful Women via Flickr

 

Chelsea Clinton will hit the campaign trail for her mother next week, marking her debut appearance in the 2016 presidential race.

Clinton, 35, will headline three events in New Hampshire on Tuesday, according to an announcement from the Democratic frontrunner's campaign.

As the only child of Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, Chelsea Clinton remains a political celebrity. Her announcement last month that she is expecting a second child attracted international media attention.

Jason Moon / NHPR

Three Republicans hoping for a big showing in the New Hampshire primary -- Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Marco Rubio -- were busy locally this week. The three are also angling for many of the same voters as Primary Day approaches. NHPR caught up with them in Derry, Bedford and Meredith.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House wrapped up its second day of the new legislative session Thursday after voting on dozens of bills and even hosting a few GOP presidential candidates.

Former Governor of Virginia Jim Gilmore was the first candidate to join the House as part of a month-long series leading up to the presidential primary on February 9.

This isn't the first time Carly Fiorina's had to deliver an "elevator pitch" — though, as far as she can recall, this was the first time she's had to give that pitch in an actual elevator.

Carly Fiorina
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a conversation with NHPR’s The Exchange, Republican presidential candidate and former technology executive Carly Fiorina called for a more aggressive response when other countries wage cyberattacks on the United States.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

With just a little more than a month to go before the New Hampshire primary, Republican Donald Trump continues to dominate the polls.

Now, as other GOP candidates aim their attacks at one another, it seems everyone else is now fighting for second.

James Pindell covers the New Hampshire Primary for the Boston Globe.

He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about his reporting on the issue.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It was a long first day for the New Hampshire House, as lawmakers debated dozens of bills to begin the 2016 session.

The House passed a proposal, 206 to 146, to allow people to carry a concealed firearm without a license. A similar measure passed the House and Senate but was vetoed by Governor Hassan last year.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The new legislative session began in Concord Wednesday morning on a slightly unusual note.

Before voting started, House Speaker Shawn Jasper pleaded with his fellow lawmakers to respect each other - both in and out of the State House.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're now just one month away from Primary Day in New Hampshire, when the politicking stops (or at least moves elsewhere) and the voting starts.

Maybe you're only now paying attention to the race. Maybe you still haven't decided how to cast your ballot, or want to brush up on a particular issue. In any case, help is here. 

Emily Corwin for NHPR

On Thursday morning, The Exchange will sit down for its latest in a series of conversations with presidential candidates — this time with Carly Fiorina, the former Hewlett Packard CEO seeking the Republican nomination. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Legislature is opening its election-year session with plenty of political maneuvering expected to steer policy discussions.

State lawmakers get back to work this week. The New Hampshire House meets today; the State Senate tomorrow. Joining me now to talk about some of the matters lawmakers will debate this year is NHPR’s senior political reporter, Josh Rogers.

OK Josh, lots of issues coming up quick this year.

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Donald Trump rallied supporters in Claremont Tuesday night. The GOP front-runner ended things with a rapid fire answers to shouted questions from the audience, and some off the cuff shouting of his own.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire’s heroin and opioid epidemic has become a front-and-center issue on the campaign trail – prompting presidential candidates from both parties to answer question after question about what they’d do to fight addiction on a national level.

Getty Images

 

Presidential hopefuls and New Hampshire's top elected officials are coming together to talk about drug addiction and how to fight it.

Heroin and opioid abuse has become a top issue for local and national politicians in New Hampshire, where officials estimate roughly 400 people died from overdoses in 2015.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In Nashua Monday, Bill Clinton drew more than 700 people to his first campaign appearance for his wife this primary season. And while the former president remains popular among New Hampshire Democrats, many in the crowd at Nashua Community College said his wife's candidacy rests on her own record.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In the lobby of the Radisson hotel in downtown Manchester, high school and college students find themselves thrust into a microcosm of the New Hampshire primary. Several presidential campaigns from both parties are here, along with a slew of political professionals, advocacy groups, and other card-carrying political junkies. Stickers, buttons, and email lists are everywhere. There are even cardboard cut-outs of several presidential candidates spread throughout the room.

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

As a state task force on heroin and opioid misuse wraps up its official work, lawmakers involved say the real work is just beginning.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders generally passes up opportunities to take a dig at Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton. And he preaches the virtues of an issue-driven campaign. But Donald Trump clearly gets under his skin.

Sanders says time after time, the Republican front-runner "just comes up with things off the top of his head — that are lies."

And now the Vermont senator says Trump should stop talking about Bill Clinton's sexual history and start worrying about climate change, the minimum wage and tax breaks for rich people like Trump himself.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is dismissing a terrorist propaganda video that uses part of one his stump speeches.

"They use other people," he told CBS' Face the Nation in an interview aired today. "What am I going to do? I have to say what I have to say. And you know what I have to say, there's a problem."

It all started with a question about food labeling at the Iowa Agriculture Summit earlier this year and Jeb Bush's not-so-humble brag:

"When I go to Publix in Coral Gables after church to go prepare for Sunday Funday in my house ... I'll probably make a really good guacamole and I want to know where that avocado is from and I want to know where the onions are from and the cilantro and all the secret stuff I put in it."

Jason Moon for NHPR

Republican Presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich made another round of campaign stops in New Hampshire this week. He’s among the presidential candidates who have spent the most time in New Hampshire this primary season and it shows.

 

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Joseph McQuaid, publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader, might’ve kicked the proverbial hornet’s nest when he penned a front-page editorial calling Republican frontrunner Donald Trump “a crude blowhard with no clear political philosophy.”

But the newspaperman was simply continuing his outlet’s long-running tradition of cutting presidential candidates down to size. 

You’d be hard-pressed to find a political animal as mystifying, misunderstood and over-analyzed as the so-called “independent” voter of New Hampshire.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

When Donald Trump took the stage in Nashua Monday night, he was greeted by hundreds of people sporting red “Make America Great Again” hats, waving Trump signs and this song, "We're Not Gonna Take It," by Twisted Sister.

During his hour and a half stump speech, the GOP presidential candidate addressed his standard points: building a wall along the southern border, defeating ISIS and bashing the media -- this time the local media.

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