Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Beverly via Flickr CC

What are the limits on presidential campaign funding? Can I really spend whatever I want to help my candidate get elected?

Courtesy Emma Stein

In December 1999, six weeks before the 2000 New Hampshire primary, John Rauh watched as Republican Sen. John McCain and Democrat Bill Bradley met in Claremont to denounce the role of money in politics.

Republican Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is campaigning this week in New Hampshire. By some measures, the former Hewlett Packard CEO is doing very well compared to her primary opponents. But when it comes to pounding the pavement, she faces one basic challenge: introducing herself to voters.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Democrat Martin O’Malley returned to the campaign trail in New Hampshire this week. His main challenge, at this point in the primary race, is introducing himself to as many Granite State voters as he can.

If you’ve been wondering how the state budget battle might play out through the dog days of summer, the past week provided some insight. None of it, however, seems very promising for a smooth resolution.

Brady Carlson/NHPR

Medicine came up often when GOP presidential candidate and former neurosurgeon Ben Carson campaigned at the Corner View Restaurant in Concord Wednesday.

“I’ve never lost my awe of the brain,“ Carson confided to a pre-med student who approached him inside the diner with a portrait to sign.

But Carson wasn’t alone in talking about -- and expressing wonder at -- the human body.

Candy Carson, the candidate’s wife, swapped birth stories with a group of women in the restaurant.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Former Gov. of Maryland Martin O’Malley laid out his plan to reduce college debt at Saint Anselm’s College Wednesday morning in Manchester.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

 

Democrat Martin O'Malley is calling the high cost of college a "crisis" as he lays out a goal of debt-free tuition for all students at public colleges and universities within five years if elected president.

The former governor of Maryland will outline his proposal Wednesday morning in New Hampshire. Focusing on college costs could help O'Malley among younger voters in New Hampshire, where the average student loan debt burden is the nation's highest.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Donald Trump is providing an example for his fellow GOP presidential candidates -- an example of how not to talk on the campaign trail.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Like many of this years GOP presidential candidates, Dr. Ben Carson spoke at New Hampshire’s traditional Politics and Eggs series, which has been a must stop for White House hopefuls for almost two decades.

But unlike most of the fourteen candidates, the former neurosurgeon has zero political experience. That lack of political baggage is actually an advantage, he told his audience. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, expected to face a tough re-election battle next year, has received a $500,000 donation from a Republican entrepreneur who wants his party to confront climate change.

AP/Allegra Boverman

As Harry Reid, the Senate’s Democratic leader, prepares to retire from Congress, he’s turning his attention to the handful of races next year that could sway control of the Senate. And, according to a recent story in Politico, Reid has taken a particular interest in New Hampshire – specifically the question of whether Gov. Maggie Hassan will jump into the Senate race herself.  

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley says he'd prefer there were no super PACs, but stopped short of calling on one supporting him to stop airing negative attack ads against Democratic rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

"I would hope that we would keep this debate a debate about the issues and I would prefer, not that I'm able to tell a super PAC what to do, I would prefer that we didn't have any super PACs, frankly," he said.

Allegra Boverman

U.S. Rep. Frank Guinta has scheduled his first town hall meeting since the Federal Election Commission concluded that he accepted $355,000 in illegal campaign donations from his parents.

NH1 News reports that Guinta will hold the meeting Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at the Gilman Library in Alton.

In a settlement made public in May, the FEC fined the 1st District Republican $15,000 and ordered him to repay his parents. Guinta insists the money belonged to him because for years he contributed to and managed a "family pot" of money.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

 

U.S. Rep. Annie Kuster is calling for a long-term transportation funding bill to pass Congress.

With the Route 4 bridge construction project in West Lebanon as a backdrop, Kuster on Monday said essential roadwork in New Hampshire and around the country could be threatened if Congress fails to pass a funding bill by the end of the month.

Kuster, a Democrat, said without funding, road and bridge projects could come to a halt during the busy summer building season, putting construction crews out of work.

Gov. Maggie Hassan has signed off on a bill that expands the use of medical marijuana to those with epilepsy, lupus and Parkinson’s disease. Currently about a dozen other illnesses are included under the law.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump's recent comments about undocumented Mexican immigrants have cost him business deals ranging from the Miss USA Pageant to a clothing line at Macy's. Trump's stance is also drawing increasing criticism from his rivals for the GOP presidential nomination.

AP

As promised, Gov. Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed anyone who can legally own a gun to carry it concealed without a license.

Currently, people need to get a permit from local officials to carry a concealed firearm beneath a coat or in a handbag. Hassan said although she supports the second amendment, she believes eliminating this step would “compromise the public safety of our citizens.”

Ryan Lessard/NHPR

Amid the fanfare and rumbling antique cars of the Amherst Fourth of July parade, candidates for president greeted residents and posed for pictures. Four candidates in total walked the parade route.

Republicans South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham and former Texas Governor Rick Perry jogged energetically from handshake to handshake, often joking with residents. Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush kept a steadier pace behind them.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

After officially entering the GOP presidential race in his home state of New Jersey on Tuesday, Gov. Chris Christie kicked off his campaign with a five-day trip to New Hampshire.

At a town hall event in Sandown Tuesday night, Christie told voters, "I want to be the next president of the United States and I plan to win the next election." And he's relying, in large part, on his personality to help him do that.

Former U.S. Sen. Jim Webb has become the fifth Democrat to announce he is seeking the party's nomination for president.

"[Our] country needs a fresh approach to solving the problems that confront us and too often unnecessarily divide us," Webb said in a statement. "We need to shake the hold of these shadow elites on our political process."

Webb, 69, joins former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee in the 2016 contest.

Independence Day means fireworks, BBQs, flags – and, in New Hampshire, presidential politics.

The three-day weekend has lured at least eight candidates for president to the Granite State. The candidates, Republican and Democratic, will appear up and down the state, Friday through Sunday. So, if you've always wanted to discuss foreign policy with the future leader of the Free World while holding a sparkler, now might be your chance.

www.merrimack4th.com

You may be planning a lazy holiday weekend this Fourth of July. But for many presidential candidates, the Fourth is just another opportunity to work for votes, though with one big difference: On Independence Day, the campaign trail is likely to follow a parade route.

Ken Rudin for NHPR

July 1, 1995 – In the race for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole holds a 39-point lead over Sen. Phil Gramm in an average of national polls.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Republican U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte kicked off her re-election bid Tuesday night in Manchester.

She spoke with NHPR's Morning Edition about seeking a second term, and weighed in on last week's two historic decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Historically, this is a bit early to make an announcement. We’re still 17 months out from the election. Is this is a move as some have suggested to get a jump on your likely Democratic opponent Gov. Maggie Hassan, who’s embroiled in her own state budget battle?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As of Wednesday, New Hampshire is now living under a six-month temporary state spending plan based on the last budget’s funding levels.

That means some agencies that were guaranteed increased funding in the 2016-2017 budget plan will be in flux until a new plan is crafted. That includes additional money for substance abuse treatment, a 10-bed crisis unit at New Hampshire Hospital and increased funds for winter road maintenance.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie didn’t waste much time hitting the campaign trail after declaring his candidacy for the GOP presidential nomination Tuesday morning. Just hours after the announcement at his former high school in his home state, Christie met with voters in New Hampshire.

kellyfornh.com

Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte kicks off her bid for reelection Tuesday night in Manchester.

Ayotte is seeking her second term in the U.S. Senate, but the election isn’t until November of next year.

Kelly Ayotte in Portsmouth
Cheryl Senter / NHPR

 

Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte is officially kicking off her re-election campaign this week.

Ayotte told supporters in an email Sunday that she will start campaigning for a second term on Tuesday, with a rally in Manchester. She says she is running again because she wants to continue fighting for New Hampshire.

Pages