Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

AP Photo / Evan Vucci

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump used a speech in Windham last night to criticize his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton.

Speaking to a crowd of several hundred supporters in a gymnasium at Windham High School, Trump went on the offensive, using a line of attack usually employed by Hillary Clinton against him.

“So ‘unstable Hillary’ she lacks the judgement, temperament and moral character to lead this country. She is a dangerous liar – her greatest achievement is that.”

Kate Harper for NHPR

A new WBUR poll of New Hampshire voters shows that Democrat Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead over her Republican rival Donald Trump in this year’s general election. The poll also has good news for Democrat Maggie Hassan’s bid to unseat Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte. Steve Koczela joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to dissect the results of the poll. Koczela is president of MassINC Polling Group, which conducted the WBUR survey.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Each year since 2010, the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity has asked New Hampshire candidates to sign onto a “pledge” vowing to cut taxes and spending, as well as to oppose the Affordable Care Act.

And usually, the Republicans running for governor are quick to sign on. That's not the case this year.

Jason Moon for NHPR

New Hampshire’s largest public employee labor union is throwing its weight behind Democrat Colin Van Ostern in his bid for governor. It’s the latest in a spate of union endorsements in the race.

Jason Moon for NHPR

As Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president in Philadelphia last night, supporters in New Hampshire took in the moment at watch parties across the state.

Inside the offices of the Portsmouth Democratic Committee, about 30 people sat in folding chairs to watch the Democratic National Convention unfold.

As they waited for Hillary Clinton’s speech, the group heard from former Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter and spoke via speakerphone to New Hampshire delegates on the convention floor.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Even as she sat in the lobby of her hotel Thursday morning, hours before the convention was scheduled to gavel in, just a simple question was enough to move Judi Lanza to tears.

What would it be like for her, in the stands tonight, to watch Hillary Clinton accept the Democratic Party’s nomination?

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Ask around long enough on the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, and you’ll find plenty of critiques about New Hampshire’s place in the presidential nominating contest.

At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Wednesday night, a retired Navy rear admiral with New Hampshire ties described Donald Trump as too erratic to lead the nation’s military.

John Hutson, who served as dean of the UNH School of Law for a decade, criticized the Republican nominee for endorsing torture and for proposals he says would require U.S. troops to commit war crimes.

“This very morning, he personally invited Russia to hack us,” Hutson said. “That’s not law and order; that’s criminal intent.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senator Martha Fuller Clark was the only one of New Hampshire's eight superdelegates to support Sen. Bernie Sanders.

That's despite Sanders' 22-point victory in in the state in February. 

She cast her vote during Tuesday night's roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

But now that Hillary Clinton is officially the Democratic nominee and Sanders has endorsed her, Fuller Clark says it's time for all Democrats to rally behind the former Secretary of State.

Back in February, Bernie Sanders beat Hillary Clinton by 22 points in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary.

But in the end, when the roll call took place on the floor of the Democratic National Convention Tuesday night, the Granite State was a tie: Its 32 delegates to the convention ended up splitting evenly between Sanders and Clinton.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen  says it's time for Bernie Sanders supporters to unite behind presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton.

"We can't afford to have people sitting on the sidelines complaining," Shaheen said, speaking to NHPR's Morning Edition from Philadelphia.

"I am reminded of the 2000 race between Al Gore and George W. Bush when people who were not happy with Al Gore in New Hampshire voted for Ralph Nader and swung the state’s four electoral votes to George W. Bush and that was the election," Shaheen said.

Senator Bernie Sanders closed out the first night of the Democratic National Convention with a prime-time speech where he urged his supporters to carry on the campaign’s legacy while also uniting around Hillary Clinton.

As expected, the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Maggie Hassan is on pace to become the most expensive political campaign in New Hampshire history. With more than three months to go before Election Day, the contest is already awash in cash: Total spending stands at $34 million.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

N.H. Democratic National Committeewoman Kathy Sullivan says she's "outraged" by leaked emails that seem to show Democratic National Committee officials favored Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders during the primary.

"I think somebody was asleep at the switch because when you have a neutrality rule in place, you’re supposed to follow the neutrality rule closely," Sullivan told NHPR's Morning Edition. "I was very disappointed to see that it was not followed at the DNC."

NHPR's Casey McDermott is reporting this week from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.  

Check this page frequently for updates, stories, photos, and to listen to live streaming coverage from the convention presented by NPR.

Click here for the live stream, which will broadcast coverage each day from 8 PM to 11 PM EST.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

To say that Pam Livengood made an impression on Hillary Clinton’s campaign might be an understatement.

The Keene resident first met Clinton last year, on the candidate’s first campaign visit to New Hampshire. At the time, she spoke up about how her family’s been affected by the state’s substance abuse crisis – she took over guardianship of her grandson a few years ago because of issues stemming from her daughter's drug addiction.

DARREN MCCOLLESTER / GETTY IMAGES

As the only New Hampshire superdelegate to support Sen. Bernie Sanders, state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark is nonetheless ready to unite around the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, heading into the general election.

Bringing the rest of the delegation on board, she says, might be more difficult.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican Presidential nomination in Cleveland late Thursday night. But hours before Trump’s victory speech, NHPR’s Paige Sutherland met up with voters in Londonderry – who were both for and against the GOP nominee.

Donald Trump laid out his vision to Republicans and the nation Thursday night as he accepted his party’s nomination.

For New Hampshire delegates loyal to Trump, Thursday was a chance to celebrate their candidate, their own improbable rise, and thumb their nose at elements of their party who doubted Trump. For many delegates who didn’t back Trump, it was a time to reassess.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican nominee Donald Trump will address his party’s convention in Cleveland tonight. New Hampshire delegates loyal to Donald Trump are looking forward to the speech. But plenty of other delegates will be looking away, or looking on from afar.

To hear Donald Trump delegate Steve Stepanek tell it, the Republican National Convention has done its job, and the matter is settled.

“We know we need Donald Trump as our next leader, and I think everybody understands this is what we need, this is where we go.”

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Republican National Convention may be dominating the headlines. But following Senator Kelly Ayotte Wednesday morning, you wouldn’t know it.

Instead of spending the week in Cleveland, Ayotte was here in Portsmouth, touring a company that makes devices to treat cancer tumors with electrical fields.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In their first primary debate Wednesday morning, Republican Congressional candidate Rich Ashooh and incumbent Frank Guinta sparred over Guinta’s campaign finance violations.

During the debate on WGIR, Ashooh said voters should be concerned about the $355,000 in illegal contributions Guinta’s parents made to his campaign committee in 2010.

Kelli True / NHPR

Before the New Hampshire Primary, state Republican Party Chairwoman Jennifer Horn was outspoken in her criticism of Donald Trump, calling his comments about women "disrespectful" and his remark about Sen. John McCain not being a war hero "disgraceful."

She also called his proposed ban on foreign Muslims "un-American."

Now, Horn says she has no reservations about Trump, who Tuesday night became the Republican presidential nominee once the delegates cast their votes.

New Hampshire Congresswoman Ann Kuster was in Concord Tuesday to talk about sexual assault and how colleges and universities can prevent such incidents in the future. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

As Americans for Prosperity's footprint grows in the New Hampshire, a lot of information about its finances remains shielded from the public. Here's a breakdown of the group's origins here, where it fits (or doesn't fit) into state election laws, and what reporting requirements it does have to follow.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A mid-summer Saturday afternoon should, by normal standards, be a sleepy time in New Hampshire politics. The presidential primary is months in the rearview mirror. The state elections are just revving up, and the Legislature has left town for the year.

So why were John and Laura Spottiswood loading up the family van to go canvassing in Goffstown?

NHPR Staff

U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte may be skipping the GOP convention this week, but there there is still plenty of politicking being done on her behalf. When Iowa Senator Joni Ernst addressed a breakfast hosted by the NH GOP, she spent roughly half her speech discussing Kelly Ayotte.

Via twitter.com/jepersing

New Hampshire’s Republican delegation is in Cleveland for day two of the party’s national convention.

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting from Cleveland this week. He spoke with Morning Edition's Rick Ganley about what they delegation is up to, and how they feel about what's transpired so far.

A Keene woman will speak at the opening day of the Democratic National Convention next week.

Pam Livengood is one of the “everyday Americans” set to speak in Philadelphia, according to a schedule released by the Democratic National Committee.

Livengood opened up at Hillary Clinton’s first campaign stop in New Hampshire last year about how she and her husband are taking care of their grandson because his mother is battling drug addiction.

New Hampshire Republican delegate Gordon Humphrey had some sharp words Monday to describe the way his party is managing its convention.

The former U.S. Senator was among a group of so-called Never Trump delegates trying to force a roll call vote on the proposed convention rules, leading to a chaotic scene on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

The effort by Humphrey and others was ultimately shut down after the roll call was rejected following a series of voice votes.

Speaking to MSNBC afterward, Humphrey criticized the process.

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