Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Sean Hurley

While most New Hampshire’s cities and towns will use machines to count votes this Primary Day, many towns still do things the old-fashioned way: hand-counted ballots.  But fewer towns stick to that method every year. This year, five new towns have opted to go the automated tabulator route. NHPR's Sean Hurley lives in one of those towns: Thornton.  He visited Town Hall to see how officials there are faring with the newfangled device.


Chris Jensen for NHPR

At Dixville Notch the traditional midnight primary voting took less than a minute for the ballots to be cast by the four Republicans, four independents and one Democrat.

Moderator Tom Tillotson announced the results.

“On the Republican side we have for Donald J. Trump two. For John R. Kasich we have three. On the Democratic side we have four votes cast for Bernie Sanders. None for Hillary.”

The vote took place at the shuttered Balsams Resort. Most of the voters in previous years moved away after the resort closed late in 2011.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

Explore our interactive maps or click the links below to navigate through the results tables.

Click here to see our live blog with news and updates from the polls.

Table of State Level Results - Democratic Primary
Table of State Level Results - Republican Primary

Florida Senator Marco Rubio spoke to voters in Nashua just a few miles from where started his campaign in the state ten months ago. The main idea he offered to folks in this gymnasium: He’s the one candidate who can bring the Republican Party together. 


Allegra Boverman, NHPR

  On the eve of the New Hampshire primary, speaking to an estimated 300 people inside a packed American Legion Hall in Manchester, Ted Cruz’s last pitch to voters boiled down to this: The other guys in the race might say they’re running as true conservatives, but he’s the only one with the track record to prove it.

“Nobody on that debate stage stands up and says, ‘Hi, I’m an establishment moderate squish, I stand for nothing,’” Cruz said, prompting laughs from the audience. “They run” pretending to be us.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

For months after announcing his White House bid, Bernie Sanders didn’t run a single campaign commercial on television. But he was everywhere online: emails, social media posts and paid ads on desktop computers and mobile devices.

Sanders has spent $10 million building a presence on the Internet, more than anyone else running for president this year. While the Vermont senator has hardly turned his back on TV, he’s betting that the voters most likely to embrace his vision for the country are online, not in front of a 50” flat-screen.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush campaigned in Nashua on Monday, and criticized the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United ruling. 

Bush spoke at an invitation-only Rotary lunch at the Nashua Country Club, where he was asked about what he would do to counter the influence of money in politics.

In a break from other Republicans in the race, Bush expressed disappointment with the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United v. FEC ruling and said he would support changing it.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Would-be Presidents are making their final pitches to New Hampshire voters in advance of tomorrow's presidential primary. GOP candidates are crisscrossing the state in the final push.

Governor Chris Christie told voters in Hampstead to recall the final presidential debate as they decide who to vote for.

"And when the lights get really bright, and you are getting tested. You either shine or you melt. When you are sitting in the oval office we do not want a president who will melt."

For New Hampshire, Tuesday’s vote is not only a chance to weigh in on the presidential candidates. It’s an opportunity to mark 100 years since the start of the first in the nation presidential primary.

Brady Carlson, from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio, reports.

AP

 If you attended Hillary Clinton’s campaign stops over the weekend, it wasn’t hard to find Clinton supporters who don’t expect Clinton to win Tuesday.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

Neither Morgan Brady nor Danielle Martin has made it to one of the dozens of political events hosted at their school, Saint Anselm College, in the last year.

“We’re nursing students,” Martin explained, somewhat apologetically. “So we spend a lot of time in the labs. We don’t see much sunlight.”

Still, that doesn’t mean they haven’t felt the primary’s near omnipresence on their campus.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Wondering where to vote on Tuesday? What time time polls open?  Whether or not you need to bring ID?

If you want to know whether Hillary Clinton will stay close to Bernie Sanders Tuesday, or are looking for an early hint of how the Republican race will end up, here's a tip: Keep an eye on Rochester.

Sean Hurley

About 1500 people turned out to see Donald Trump at Plymouth State University this weekend during one of his final campaign stops before the Primary.  NHPR's Sean Hurley was there and sends us this.

Donald Trump didn't venture far from familiar talking points. China, Vets, Common Core, bomb the oil - the wall...the fact that he's the only candidate funding his own campaign. "I have no friends as far as I'm concerned," Trump told the mostly standing crowd. "You know who's my friends?  You're my friends..."

Young voters in Iowa helped propel Sen. Bernie Sanders to a close second-place finish in the Democratic presidential race. He’ll be looking for similar results here in New Hampshire, but the trick for Sanders will be to translate youthful excitement into actual votes.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

  Republican senator Marco Rubio spent Sunday campaigning around the state—from a pancake breakfast in Londonderry to a Super Bowl watch party in Manchester. His stops came a day after Saturday’s GOP debate where other candidates challenged Rubio’s readiness for the job. 

Audio Pending...

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Back in April, Shooter’s Pub in Exeter played host to one of Chris Christie’s first town halls in New Hampshire.

That was months before the New Jersey governor officially announced his bid for president, when he was still just introducing himself to the people of the Granite State.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Marco Rubio got hit hard in Saturday's GOP debate, when Chris Christie accused the Florida senator of sticking to the same rehearsed lines over and over again. And for those few minutes, Rubio seemed unable to break script in the face of the attack.

To be fair, Rubio is certainly a candidate who's loyal to his stump speech. On his visits around New Hampshire, Rubio has essentially stuck to a trusty formula at town halls and rallies. So let's look at speech, and Rubio's classic talking points. Scroll through to read a brief breakdown, and listen to clips.

Before last night’s GOP debate got underway the lawn of St. Anselm college filled with Republican supporters. They had signs and chants—but also mixed in the crowd of 500 or so people were protesters pushing for a $15 federal minimum wage. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty went into the crowd and captured these voices. 

    

Saturday's GOP debate was the final one before Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. Here were five key moments:


1. That awkward start

One key thing has to happen before the debate starts: the candidates have to take the stage.

That proved more complicated than usual on Saturday night, as the ABC News Republican debate began with Ben Carson refusing to walk out to his podium, even after the moderators called his name.

Jason Moon for NHPR

On Friday night, New Hampshire Democrats gathered in Manchester for the annual 100 Club Dinner. The event provided a chance for Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton to make closing arguments ahead of next the Primary next Tuesday.

Friday night’s Mcintyre-Shaheen 100 Club Dinner was a who’s who of prominent Democrats, both local and national. Among the speakers were National Democratic Party Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Congresswoman Ann Kuster, Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Governor Maggie Hassan, and of course Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton.

Latino voters are expected to turn out in record numbers across the country this election year. For many, learning the basics of how to vote is the first step.


Victory in the New Hampshire Primary is usually counted in one way:  the candidate with the most vote wins.

But there’s another measure of primary success, something less tangible than vote totals: How long, and intensely, does a candidate woo New Hampshire voters?

The clear winners in that race this year are Republicans Chris Christie and John Kasich.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Jason Kirkwood, a machinist born and raised in Rochester, came to a Bernie Sanders campaign rally after work on Thursday.

While he’s has come across plenty of Clinton fans here in his hometown, “I think there’s a lot of Bernie supporters. I think it’s kind of divided,” he said, “I think there’s a lot of Hillary supporters but I personally don’t like her because I truly think she’s a pawn in the game to the corporate leaders.”

Sheryl Rich-Kern

In the hallway at Nashua High South, students walk by presidential candidates like Trump, Cruz, Sanders and Clinton — or at least their life-size cutouts on cardboard. The school is hosting a mock primary, and the chatter in the library is as intense as the real deal.

"Guys by alphabet, E through K, L through P, Q through Z. Get in the right alphabet. And get out your student IDs.

As students line up to get their ballots, sophomore Thalia Henningsen lingers behind. She’s like many of today’s eligible voters. Still undecided. Here's our exchange:

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Based on the large Donald Trump sign that decorates his lawn on South Road in Hopkinton, you might assume Eric Habben plans to vote for Donald Trump.

“Initially I was, but now I’m really torn as far as whether I will or not," Habben said.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night, all eyes were on the Democratic presidential contenders as they sparred in their final debate before the New Hampshire Primary. Voters who turned out to see them, at the University of New Hampshire, ranged from firmly decided to not yet sure.

The fifth debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders was their first appearance as a duet, and that helped to highlight some of their harmony – even as it heightened their crescendos of dissonance.

With Martin O'Malley having suspended his campaign earlier in the week, the two remaining rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination met in New Hampshire on Thursday night — on stage together for nearly two hours.

"I happen to respect the secretary very much; I hope it's mutual," said Sanders.

And Clinton reciprocated:

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

All this week, NHPR has been seeking out New Hampshire residents to talk politics, far from the presidential primary campaign trail. For our last installment, Paige Sutherland visited a Manchester gym to ask voters what's on their minds.

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