Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Recent claims about Bernie Sanders' economic proposals are hurting the Democratic Party, say four former White House economists.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A little over a week ago, Linda Philibert was just another regular at Blake’s Restaurant on Manchester’s West Side.

But there was little that was regular about her recent stop there last Monday morning.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A bill that would crack down on sales of firearms to people banned from having guns is working its way through the State House.  

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The New Hampshire House Finance Committee on Wednesday will take up a bill seeking to continue the state’s expanded Medicaid program for another two years.

RICCARDO S. SAVI, GETTY IMAGES

Gov. Maggie Hassan ordered New Hampshire flags to half staff to honor Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who died this weekend at age 79.

“Justice Scalia served our country with honor and our entire nation mourns his sudden loss,” Hassan wrote in a statement. “Tom and I send our deepest condolences to Maureen, his entire family, and his many friends, loved ones and colleagues.”

Kate Harper for NHPR

The New Hampshire Republican Party wants the state's Democratic superdelegates to support Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders in his bid for the party's presidential nomination.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Although the full House will not be meeting this week, lawmakers still have their hands full working through dozens of bills in committee.

Jim Cole/AP

In the months leading up to Tuesday’s primary, nearly every presidential candidate mentioned New Hampshire’s opioid and heroin epidemic while on the stump in the Granite State.

But now that the New Hampshire primary has come and gone - will this issue be forgotten on the campaign trail as candidates' shift focus to other states?

How did the drug issue became a talking point on the 2016 trail?

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly on Saturday. We spoke to NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about his life, legacy and what's next.

1. Let's talk about Scalia's legal perspective. He was known as a proponent of originalism. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Originalism, as defined by Justice Scalia and others, is that what is in the Constitution literally is what the founding fathers meant.

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional responsibilities to nominate a successor in — due time," Obama said. "There will be plenty of time for me to do so, and for the Senate to fulfill its responsibility to give that person a fair hearing and a timely vote."

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.

So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, perhaps the leading voice of uncompromising conservatism on the nation's highest court, was found dead Saturday, Chief Justice John Roberts has confirmed. Scalia, who had been staying at a luxury ranch in West Texas, was 79 years old.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

One of the more closely-watched Senate contests of 2016 won’t be bound by a so-called people’s pledge after all.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, the Republican incumbent, and Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan have failed to reach an agreement to limit the influence of outside political groups in the race.

Manchester Polls
Susan Posner / NHPR

An undercover video claiming to show out-of-state residents attempting to vote in the presidential primary is being reviewed by the Attorney General and is likely to renew a years-long debate over voter ID rules in New Hampshire

PAUL YOUNG/LINDSEY GRAHAM CAMPAIGN

The candidates have flown out, the national cameras have shifted focus, and soon the yard signs will begin to disappear.

But for the local media, who'll stay put as the campaigns continue onward – it all feels so sudden.

NHPR Staff

Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte is calling on Democratic challenger, Governor Maggie Hassan, to sign a pledge that aims to limit third party spending in the race for US Senate.

The so-called People’s Pledge proposes the candidates agree to pay fines in the form of charitable donations when third party ads are aired in their favor.

That same pledge was used in the 2012 Massachusetts Senate race.


Flickr

A federal bill that provides money for addiction treatment and drug prevention has passed its first hurdle. Senators Kelly Ayotte and Jeanne Shaheen co-sponsored the legislation. 

The bill calls for additional dollars for a number of areas including treatment for people battling addiction while in prison, drug prevention efforts in schools, and expanding access to the overdose reversal drug Narcan.

On Thursday, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee passed the measure by a unanimous vote. But how much of the bill’s $70 million would go to New Hampshire is unknown.

AP

New Hampshire is one step closer to complying with a federal identification law known as Real ID. That’s after the House Thursday overwhelmingly passed a bill making it optional for people to get Real ID licenses. 

Rik Stevens for NHPR

  DURHAM, N.H. — The huge Carly Fiorina signs along New Hampshire's Route 4 weren't enough to keep her campaign alive past Tuesday's presidential primary, but they could end up helping people with disabilities live their lives more independently.

The polls had it right when it came to New Hampshire’s presidential primary results—for the most part, anyway. With just a few exceptions, the polls predicted that Donald Trump would win on the Republican side, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders would beat former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a wide margin.

But, historically the polls in New Hampshire haven’t been this accurate. So, what accounts for this increased accuracy? For an answer to that question, we turn to Steve Koczela, President of the MassINC Polling Group. 

One-hundred percent of votes are now in in New Hampshire and a couple of things are now official:

1. Record for total turnout: Combining all voters — Democrats and Republicans — it was a record for a New Hampshire primary. In all, 538,094 people cast ballots. That beats the 2008 record of 527,349.

2. The Republican record was shattered: The final tally for GOP ballots cast was 284,120 votes. That beats out the 2012 Republican primary tally of 248,475.

Casey McDermott

The morning after Election Day, I stopped by Ben Carson’s campaign headquarters in Manchester to see if anything was going on.

There wasn’t. The lights were out and the doors were locked. Carson was also long gone. At a neighboring hair salon, stylist Kettia Fenestor said the Carson camp made for good neighbors. But she’s happy to put it all in the rearview.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Despite Tuesday's primary wrapping up late Tuesday night, the New Hampshire House returned to business the very next morning.

Lawmakers had a slate of bills on the docket Wednesday from continuing Medicaid expansion for another two years, to funding full-day kindergarten.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was effusive as he praised the state that gave him his first win - and made it a big one.

Ohio Governor John Kasich took the coveted second prize among Republicans in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary.

But how did the rest of the GOP field fare?

Primary Blog: In New Hampshire, Outsiders Are In As Trump, Sanders Win Big

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Full day coverage from NHPR reporters and contributors in the field. Photos, victory speeches, voter voices, and much more.

Sean Hurley

There were two big winners last night in the New Hampshire primary- and a handful of  losers.  NPHR's Sean Hurley spent some time at the Primary parties of two of the latter, Carly Fiorina and former Virginia Governor, Jim Gilmore.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

When Hillary Clinton spoke to the crowd at Southern New Hampshire University last night, she quickly addressed the bad news for her campaign.

“I want to begin by congratulating Senator Sanders on his victory tonight and I want to thank each and every one of you. And I want to say, I still love New Hampshire and I always will.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

John Kasich’s second-place finish in Tuesday’s Republican primary was perhaps the biggest surprise in a night that seemed full of foregone conclusions.  

While the Ohio governor took just 16 percent of the vote, his campaign is “the story coming out of New Hampshire," said his state chair John E. Sununu. “Nobody thought he could finish in the top tier let alone break through and beat Jeb Bush and Chris Christie and Marco Rubio and beat Ted Cruz."

Kate Brindley for NHPR

Marco Rubio took the stage at the Manchester Radisson just as Donald Trump finished his victory speech. The crowd that came to see Rubio  was much smaller than those he’d been drawing at town halls the past few days—journalists far outnumbered the disappointed faces tonight, and Rubio addressed exactly why.

"I want you to understand something. Our disappointment tonight is not on you. It’s on me. It’s on me I did not do well on Saturday night so listen. that will never happen again."

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