Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

If any single mode of campaigning could be said to typify the New Hampshire Primary it would probably be the town hall meeting, where would-be presidents throw open the floor to questions from all comers. Some New Hampshire Primary winners - think John McCain - have put town halls at the very center of their strategies. But that’s not been the case with top candidates this year.

Via C-Span

Businessman Mark Connolly is running for governor. Connolly announced his candidacy Thursday in Manchester - entering a Democratic field that includes Executive Councilor Colin Van Ostern.

Gov. Maggie Hassan is not seeking re-election, as she pursues a U.S. Senate run.

Connolly is a former head of the state's Bureau of Securities Regulation, former deputy secretary of state and previously was a state representative. He runs an investment advising company in New Castle.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Carly Fiorina became the fourth major presidential candidate to file for the 2016 New Hampshire primary when she stopped by the Secretary of State’s office early Thursday afternoon. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders is officially a registered Democrat in the New Hampshire Presidential Primary. Despite some questions about the independent senator's party affiliation, Sanders passed a key hurdle Thursday to get on the New Hampshire ballot.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

When Marco Rubio came into the Secretary of State’s office to file for the New Hampshire primary ballot Thursday – it wasn’t with quite the crowd that his fellow Republican candidate Donald Trump attracted a day earlier. But the Florida senator did bring his own entourage of supporters. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When Marco Rubio sat down for a  discussion  with young professionals at St. Anselm College the issues were mostly light:

Does Rubio hit the gym to wind down after debates? No.

What kind of food might he serve at a party? Tex-Mex.

And how does the Florida Senator feel about Star Wars?

Jason Moon for NHPR

Bush began his day at Founders Academy charter school in Manchester, where he outlined his vision of what makes a great leader to a room full of students.

“My guess is, one of the great attributes of successful presidents is that they’re humble. They have humility. They recognize that it’s not all about them, it’s about having a servant’s heart and trying to fix things.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Wednesday was the first day for presidential candidates to file for the New Hampshire presidential primary. Seven candidates are now officially on the ballot -- including GOP businessman Donald Trump. 

Jeb Bush's presidential campaign is attempting a reset of sorts. Lackluster debate performances, low poll numbers, a mounting number of gaffes on the trail, and accusations — from Donald Trump specifically — that he's low-energy have left him in a rut.

City of Concord

    

It was a good day for incumbents,as voters headed to the polls Tuesday for municipal elections in most New Hampshire cities.

Concord Mayor Jim Bouley was elected to a fifth term.

Bouley defeated former radio talk show host Paul Brogan in Tuesday’s election.

In Keene, mayor Kendall Lane won a third term, beating city councilor Kris Roberts.

Berlin mayor Paul Grenier won a fourth term.

And Dover mayor Karen Weston was also re-elected, winning a second term in office.

seacoastonline.com

The city of Portsmouth has a new mayor.

Jack Blalock claimed victory Tuesday as the top vote-getter among the candidates running for city council.

He replaces Robert Lister, who did not run for re-election.

Blalock formerly served as assistant mayor of Portsmouth and chairman of the city’s Board of Adjustment.

Assistant Mayor Jim Splaine will return to that position, after receiving the second-most votes in yesterday’s election.

Ted Siefer for NHPR

In Manchester, incumbent Mayor Ted Gatsas won election to a fourth term in office. But he beat Alderman Joyce Craig by less than one percent of the vote in an election that saw the largest turnout in years.

www.facebook.com/jim.donchess

Nashua voters chose Jim Donchess as their new mayor Tuesday, with Donchess defeating Chris Williams by just more than 1900 votes.

Donchess will replace incumbent Mayor Donnalee Lozeau who after eight years, did not run for reelection.

A rallying cheer rumbled through the Martha’s Exchange restaurant in downtown Nashua Tuesday evening as Jim Donchess walked in to greet his supporters.

But Donchess was quick to turn to city business.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

For most presidential candidates, getting on the New Hampshire ballot is a fairly straightforward affair: Show up at the State House, bring $1,000 to cover the filing fee, and sign a form affirming  you’re registered with your chosen political party.

For Bernie Sanders, that last part has proven slightly more complicated.

Jack Rodolico

The federal government is investigating the City of Concord for not providing accessible voting machines for people with certain disabilities during local elections. The city may have violated federal law.

Guy Woodland used his cane to find his way into a voting booth in Concord Tuesday morning. Woodland is blind.

"I have a non-valid driver’s license," he told a poll worker, "which you’re probably happy to know."

Here’s how Woodland would like to vote: on his own, with no help.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The presidential candidates who start parading through Secretary of State Bill Gardner’s office this week might do well to pay special attention to the desk that’ll be on display nearby — its original owner is to thank (or blame) for why they’re spending so much time in New Hampshire these days.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Retired state workers under age 65 will have to pay 5 percent more in monthly premiums beginning in January, under changes approved by lawmakers Tuesday morning.

Andrew Walsh, NHPR

By now, those on the front lines at the Secretary of State’s office have come to expect two distinct types when it comes to presidential candidates.

There are the ones who treat the ballot filing period like a campaign event. They bring along throngs of supporters and make sure to call ahead to check that they won’t have to share the spotlight with any competitors.

And then there are the ones who just show up.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Maggie Hassan is asking lawmakers to return to Concord nearly two months early to begin working on legislation aimed to help those battling drug addiction. 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Republican candidate Rand Paul spoke at UNH on Monday to a room of just over 100 students and community members. The Kentucky Senator called Jeb Bush a hypocrite; Carly Fiorina he called naïve on foreign policy. And his party in general? It did not get a lot of love.

Geoff Forester / NHPR

Voters in Manchester will cast their ballots Tuesday in the hard-fought race for mayor between three-term incumbent Ted Gatsas and Alderwoman Joyce Craig. The campaign has touched on several big issues, including crime in the city and the heroin epidemic. 

But perhaps the issue that has loomed largest is education, with the two candidates offering very different views of the challenges facing the state’s largest school district.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

Reading this story on your iPhone or iPad? Download NHPR's new State of Democracy app and stay connected to the stories that matter from the 2016 campaign trail. Click here to get the app.

While the New Hampshire Primary has been humming along at top speed for months, it’s easy to overlook the fact that two basic details have yet to be wrapped up: the actual date of the Primary election, and the official candidate names to appear on the ballot. At least one of those should start looking a bit firmer this week.

joycecraig.org

Manchester mayoral candidate Joyce Craig says she would push to hire additional police officers as part of her plan to battle the city’s heroin epidemic.

Speaking with NHPR’s Morning Edition, Craig says the department needs another 22 police officers to be fully staffed.

"They've been working very, very hard to arrest the people that are dealing drugs, so that's been going well. But we do need to build that force up to the place where they need to be."

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Sanders arrived at the William B. Cashin Senior Center in Manchester around noon Friday, having just flown in from Washington and a 3 a.m. Senate vote on the latest budget deal.

Donald Trump has run his presidential campaign by his own rules, and he's blown past traditional candidates, playing by the old rules, in the process.

It's becoming a monthly tradition — on the last day of the month, the State Department unloads thousands of Hillary Clinton's emails.

While Clinton maintains she never used her personal server to send or receive classified information, between 600 and 700 emails have been classified retroactively since the monthly releases began in May, according to Politico. The latest batch this month includes over 7,000 pages of new documents.

Jason Meserve, NHPR

An NHPR interview with Congressman Frank Guinta.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Residents in Portsmouth will choose a new mayor and nine city councilors on Tuesday. Voters will likely notice some new names on their ballots. What they might not know – is who has been guiding those candidates, behind the scenes.

FILE

Congressman Frank Guinta and Congresswoman Ann Kuster are crossing the aisle in an effort to tackle New Hampshire’s opioid epidemic.

In a roundtable event in Concord on Friday the two lawmakers talked about their new bill aimed to bring more federal dollars for substance abuse treatment to New Hampshire.

Jeb Bush went straight to New Hampshire after Wednesday night's Republican debate. That's where the former Florida governor needs a strong showing if he is to remain a contender for his party's nomination and where he's now working to reignite a campaign seen as sputtering.

The large sign that hung above Jeb Bush's head during his New Hampshire campaign stops read "Jeb Can Fix it." It was intended to refer to Washington, but to GOP voters like Larry Eller, who turned out to see Bush at a Geno's Chowder Shop in Portsmouth, the first thing Bush needs to fix is how he's campaigned.

Pages