Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

Sarah Joy via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/cNCrSo

The Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court, the Paris Agreement. The Trump administration is sure to bring lots of changes, among them: White House decor. On today’s show we’ll take a historic tour of how first families have put their stamp on the executive mansion, including President Teddy Roosevelt, who created the west wing.

Also today, we'll speak with NASA's planetary defense officer about teaming up with FEMA, the Air Force and other government agencies for a simulation of what could happen if an asteroid crashed into a densely populated region -- and how they'd respond.

FLICKR/CC J. Stephen Conn

Democrats are doing some soul searching after this election season – not only because of their loss in the Presidential race but because they lost several governorships, including in New Hampshire, capping several years of state-level losses nationwide.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Governor-Elect Chris Sununu will officially cut ties with Waterville Valley Ski Resort on Dec. 31 – just a few days before he’s set to officially step into his role as governor.

Allegra Boverman

Governor-elect Chris Sununu sat down with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley Thursday for his first interview with NHPR since last week's election.

Listen to the full interview here, or read some excerpts from the interview below that will be added throughout the morning.

One of the first decisions you made since the election has to do with your transition team.

brooklyntheborough via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5RyRoi

It's here - the day of reckoning for the most bitter, acrimonious, controversial election in recent memory. But not, it might be a relief to know, in American history. Today, some historical perspective on contentious elections with Brady Carlson: and spoiler alert - our democracy survived.

Then we'll check in with transhumanist presidential candidate Zoltan Istvan who is just one of the nineteen hundred people who decided to run for president this year. We'll talk to him about what it was like to be on the campaign trail for over a year and what he learned.

Michael Brindley

The presidential campaign is usually an opportunity every four years for students to study democracy in real time. But, by all accounts, this campaign has been anything but normal.

The adult themes and harsh rhetoric have been especially challenging for educators, who’ve had to figure out how to address these subjects in the classroom.

NHPR Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with educators across New Hampshire to see what’s different about teaching the presidential campaign this year.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In the race for the U.S. Senate seat, Republican incumbent Senator Kelly Ayotte and her Democratic challenger, Governor Maggie Hassan, weigh in on a host of issues around business and the economy, as well as topics of importance to New Hampshire voters. The Exchange's Laura Knoy, NHPR Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, and NHBR Editor Jeff Feingold  pose questions at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at St. Anselm College.

Steven Depolo: Flickr

Before the final presidential face-off on Wednesday, we evaluate the structure and history of debating, from format to questions to the moderator's role.  Also, we look at how debates this election cycle measure up to debates past, and the big question: whether these events actually influence voters.


Andrew Turner via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/pU5n2J

There’s a new wrinkle in the universal law: "What goes up, must come down." As attempts to regulate drones grow, a new arms race is afoot to develop technology that can land or destroy non-compliant or wayward drones.

And whether it's attending a rally with a parent, or absorbed through TV commercials and yard signs, kids get exposed to the unseemly side of American politics. So, how and when, should parents encourage, shape, or inform civic engagement? A teacher and a blogger weigh in on how to navigate the murky waters of this election cycle.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

You didn’t have to look much farther than the title of the campaign’s primary night party – billed as a “general election kickoff” – to know that Colin Van Ostern’s campaign was feeling pretty good about its chances heading into Tuesday.

And by the time the results started coming in, that description ended up being on point after all.

Ryan McGuire / http://gratisography.com/

Emily Post said: "Never talk about politics or religion.” But with candidates so divisive, and voters so impassioned, it's tough to follow that particular bit of advice. On today’s show, a polite guide to political conversation. First tip? Know what you're trying to accomplish.

Later in the show, we'll look at why Chicago is still paying for its failed bid to host the 2016 Olympics, and talk to the author of a new book who traced the tracks of extreme skier Doug Coombs, from earning his chops on New Hampshire's slopes to his tragic death on a mountain in France.

Politics in Hip Hop, Sleepover Podcast, & Twinkies

Jul 22, 2016
Jenn Durfey via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8VUiJf

Since it's early days, hip hop have critiqued oppressions both political and economic - while flashing their own wealth and bravado. Donald Trump became a symbol of the latter, but recent mentions of him in hip hop have become much less positive during his campaign for president in the 2016 election. 

Plus, a few years ago, one of America's most beloved snack cakes was in danger of disappearing forever - until investors swooped in and saved the day. What started out as a rescue mission quickly evolved into a business strategy, and resulted in substantial changes to the brand. How are we preserving the mythical, magical Twinkie.

freddiefraggles via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bqvjLy

Since it's early days, hip hop have critiqued oppressions both political and economic - while flashing their own wealth and bravado. Donald Trump became a symbol of the latter, but recent mentions of him in hip hop have become much less positive during his campaign for president in the 2016 election. 

And, we’ll talk with a computer scientist who will forever be remembered not for his AI research, but as inventor of the emoticon. Plus, a writer attends her first autopsy, and says Hollywood gets it all wrong.

The smartphone game Pokémon Go has quickly become one of the most-used apps in the country. Now a political advocacy group in New Hampshire is hoping to coopt some of that enthusiasm.

 Fourth of July events can draw huge crowds - and in an election year, those crowds can draw candidates. If you're looking to learn a little bit more about New Hampshire political hopefuls before you see them in parades or catch their ads on TV, NHPR's newsroom has something that might help.

We talk with Colin Woodard, author of "American Character."  In his new book, Woodard examines the history to the key American question:  how best to reconcile individual liberty with the common good.  Woodard contends this struggle can be linked to nearly every major disagreement in U.S. history right up to and including the present political divisiveness.  Woodard also suggests how to balance these competing ideals and break political deadlock. 


Holly via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9njS1o

With a divisive candidate at the top of the ticket, some republicans up for re-election in 2016 are looking to pivot their campaigns towards local issues. But can these low-level contenders avoid being tarred by the brush of presidential politics?

On today’s show, how Democrats and outside groups plan to play the trump card against local GOP candidates.

Also today, crowd sourced ratings of movies, TV and music allow everybody to chime in, but from movie critics boycotting the new Ghostbusters movie, to dismissing Taylor Swift songs as shallow, the whiff of sexism is all over online reviews...or is it?

Listen to the full show:


N.H. Elections 2016: The Race for U.S Congress

Jun 21, 2016
Kevin Flynn for NHPR

We check in on  the races for seats in both the U.S. Senate and House, taking  stock of who the candidates are in each race, and which incumbents may be facing strong challenges. We also look at what issues might define the upcoming months of campaigning here in New Hampshire, including the opioid crisis and gun control.

GUESTS

  • James Pindell – political reporter For The Boston Globe
  • Dante Scala - associate professor of political science at UNH, and a fellow at UNH's Carsey School of Public Policy. 

N.H. Elections 2016: The Race for U.S Congress

Jun 21, 2016
Kevin Flynn for NHPR

We check in on  the races for seats in both the U.S. Senate and House, taking  stock of who the candidates are in each race, and which incumbents may be facing strong challenges. We also look at what issues might define the upcoming months of campaigning here in New Hampshire, including the opioid crisis and gun control.


Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

A bill to spend nearly $2 million on body scanners for state prisons and county jails is heading to Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan's desk. Senators approved the legislation Thursday on a party line vote.

Republicans, like Andy Sanborn of Bedford, told colleagues that making anyone who sets foot in a jail or prison prison pass though scanners is a way to deal with an obvious problem.

NHPR Staff

Governor Maggie Hassan says last week's shooting of two Manchester police officers by a suspect who with mental health problems illustrates the need for New Hampshire to do a better job of keeping guns away from people who shouldn't have them.

"I think this issue needs to be looked at by a broad coalition of stakeholders and that is certainly one of the questions that they should address. I think we should work together to take steps forward to improve public safety and public heath of New Hampshire," Hassan said.

This presidential campaign season has provided plenty of fodder for satire. Two men from Keene—Blake Amacker and Stephen Polzwartek—have decided to satirize it with a board game. It’s called "Trunks ‘n Asses," and fans of Cards Against Humanity may find a lot to like in this game. They’re raising money to mass-produce the game on Kickstarter. They spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about the game.

New Hampshire's highest court has clarified the state's right-to-know law. 

The ruling came in a case involving Donna Green, Sandown's representative on the Timberlane Regional School Board.

Last year, Green sought budget documents from SAU 55.

Green  was told she could inspect them at the district's offices and pay to copy them, but was denied them when she asked for them in a digital format.

ゴンザレス 森井 via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5vBzBZ

Facial recognition software is now everywhere - in airports, stores, on our gadgets and on social media. The goal is improving security and improving public safety, but along with our growing dependency on biometrics comes a problem: not all faces are treated equally. Today, the inherent bias of facial recognition software.

Plus, are we at the end of the app bubble? We'll hear why, less than ten years after the app store launched, small and medium sized developers are getting squeezed out. 

PBS NewsHour via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/d3bnvu

While Trump leads in delegates, the Republican Party has yet to coalesce around him as nominee...and many are predicting a contested convention...which is what exactly? Today, we'll talk to a political scientist about the nuts and bolts of how a contested convention might go down. 

Also today, a philosopher on why, despite historically unprecedented access to information and knowledge, we'll never be able to Google our way to the truth.

Plus, are we at the end of the app bubble? We'll hear why, less than ten years after the app store launched, small and medium sized developers are getting squeezed out. 

UncoveringWestport via Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/4JX1zF

Bullying, R-rated topics and shouting matches during presidential debates have left some Americans wondering whatever happened to civility in politics?  But in the British Parliament, being rude is a long-standing tradition. Today, a history of Parliament's bad manners.

Also, while we usher in spring with a last minute nor'easter, we’re looking back at the most devastating storm in New England history: the hurricane of 1938. 

Plus, a tech reviewer looks at a hot new item in the world of consumer drones.

Political Turmoil in the 2016 Presidential Race

Mar 14, 2016
Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

The 2016 Presidential Race just finished one of the most tumultuous weeks of campaigning in recent memory. As Donald Trump continues to roll toward the Republican nomination, clashes at his campaign events continue, with some of the most heated occurring this weekend in Chicago. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, a tightening race in Illinois is giving the Sanders campaign hope for another come-from-behind victory over Hillary Clinton. 

GUESTS: 

Chilli Head via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5NjCc2

As Super Tuesday results came in last night, Google searches for how to move to Canada spiked 350%. Whether Obama in '08, or Trump in 2016, a surprising number of people threaten "if so and so gets elected, I'm outta here". But where would they go?  Today, when Americans commit  self-imposed political exile.

And there's no farther place to travel than outer space - we'll talk to the designer behind one of NASA's viral ad campaigns, a beautiful set of travel posters that put a fifties spin on space tourism. 

3.01.16: The Art of Moderating & the Confidence Game

Mar 1, 2016
Peter Roberts via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7MUrSR

Last week's debate among republican presidential candidates was so raucous that at one point, the closed captions couldn't keep up and simply read "unintelligible yelling". Today, a seasoned debate moderator sheds light on the tough task of keeping onstage arguments civil, and what makes for a great debate.

Then, are human beings wired to be swindled? Later in the show we'll explore the psychology of con artists and why it's so easy to fall for them.

Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

It's been quiet in the Granite State now that the candidates have moved on, but elsewhere the race has only grown more heated. This weekend we're seeing this play out in South Carolina and Nevada, where minority and military voters play a bigger role.  We'll discuss the weekend's results and what they might mean for future contests.

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