Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

The Politics of Polling Ahead of the Primary

Jul 28, 2015
IowaPolitics.com / Flickr CC

We look at how pollsters collect data and how that data affects the political process in this upcoming 2016 presidential primary.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire is backing a measure to streamline the effort to stop cyberattacks against government computer networks.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

 1st District Representative Frank Guinta is set to hold another town hall meeting today.

Guinta’s office says this afternoon’s event in Plaistow will be the Manchester Republican’s tenth such meeting since returning to Congress in January. It will also be his second town hall meeting since reaching a settlement with the Federal Election Commission, in which he agreed to repay his parents $355,000 the FEC concluded were illegal campaign donations.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The purpose of a town hall meeting is for members of the public to ask questions and get answers from elected officials or candidates. But town halls also serve as a political symbol; those who hold them can say they’re accessible to their constituents. That's what was on Frank Guinta’s mind as he outlined a new “We the People” constituent contact system at his town hall meeting Saturday in Alton. 

White House Photograph Courtesy Gerald R. Ford Library

Before Carter versus Ford, presidential debates weren’t considered a necessary part of the election process, but today, the debate stage is like the Roman Coliseum.

On today’s show, we’ll look at the history of zingers, gaffes, and memorable moments from behind the podium. Then, with a pool of candidates growing at a near exponential rate, debate planning has become a headache for the GOP. We’ll look at how party leaders and the media could take advantage of the enormous field.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire House and Senate negotiators return to work this week on the next two year state budget.

The committee of five representatives and four senators are looking to bridge differences between the budgets passed by each chamber. The Senate plan spends about $150 million dollars more than the version passed by the House, and includes business tax cuts that aren’t in the House plan.

House Finance Chair Neal Kurk, a Weare Republican, says he’s concerned the Senate plan rolls $34 million dollars in expected surplus from the current budget into the next one.

spin-glish.com/vocabulary

As new contenders join the 2016 presidential race, the flood of stump speeches and political spin can be overwhelming. On today’s show we’ll talk to a comedy writer who has mastered the art of translating deliberately deceptive double-speak: from politics, to real-estate, to food.

Plus, we’ll hear about a class action lawsuit against blue moon, charging that the self-described “artfully crafted” brew is not really a craft beer.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

If you’re hoping to follow the money in the 2016 presidential primary race, you’ve got a tough task. The fundraising tools available to candidates and their supporters are perhaps more complicated now than in any previous campaign. You've got your political actions committees (or PACs), your super PACs, your exploratory committees, your run-of-the-mill candidate committees, and countless other groups throwing their 2 (billion) cents into the 2016 presidential race.

Ash Carter / Flickr / Creative Commons

We check in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about some of the top stories in politics this month: After a caustic debate pitting Rand Paul against his fellow Senate Republicans, key provisions of the Patriot Act expire. On the primary front, Democrat Martin O’Malley and Republican Lindsey Graham declare their candidacies. And, as ISIS advances in Iraq Presidential hopefuls re-hash the Iraq war debate.

As presidential candidates visit the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire, they're hearing about heroin and meth. Drug overdoses now kill more Americans than traffic accidents. And, in many places, there's a growing acceptance that this isn't just a problem for other people.

New Hampshire is in the throes of a crisis. Last year more than 300 people in the small state died of drug overdoses. Mostly opiods like oxycontin and heroin.

www.shaheen.senate.gov

  A report on bipartisanship in Congress finds Senators from New Hampshire and Maine among the most likely to work with members of the other party. 

The only two Republican Senators from New England scored high on the Bipartisan Index put out by the Lugar Center and Georgetown University

Maine's Susan Collins was ranked most likely to reach across the aisle, with New Hampshire's Kelly Ayotte seventh.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Voters in Northwood, Nottingham, Deerfield and Candia go to the polls Tuesday for a special State House election. 

  The special election this Tuesday is between Republican Yvonne Dean-Bailey of Northwood and Democrat Maureen Mann of Deerfield.

Matthew Stinson via flickr Creative Commons| / flic.kr/p/eTSb9

With thousands of empty luxury apartments in china’s new cities, desperate measures are being taken to lure buyers. On today’s show we’ll explore the booming business of renting foreigners as props to give these ghostly city centers an air of international glamor.    

Also today, America’s population will certainly look different in 2050, but what will it sound like? A linguist suggests that to find out, you should listen to young women.

NHPR Staff

Lawmakers will debate fetal homicide laws, restrictions on synthetic drugs and more in this week's upcoming sessions.  

The Republican majority in the House is likely to amend a Senate version of fetal homicide legislation. The bill would allow for criminal charges to be brought in the death of fetuses beyond eight weeks of gestation. It says criminal charges cannot be brought against a woman or a doctor in cases of abortion. Advocates for the bill say it's necessary for women who lose their pregnancies as a result of criminal acts such as assault or car accidents.  

Sara Plourde / NHPR

NHPR

Donald Trump is headed back through New Hampshire today as he explores a possible 2016 run for president.

The real estate mogul and reality TV star is holding his first town hall meeting at New England College in Henniker. He’ll also make stops in Salem, Hudson and Concord.

Trump has considered running for the White House several times before. This time he’s taken more concrete steps to launch a campaign. He announced plans to form an exploratory committee and hired staff in early voting states, including New Hampshire.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Disasters in developing nations bring out the better angels of the world’s governments and citizens, but where that aid goes has a lot to do with media coverage. On today’s show, we discover why the world’s worst disasters don’t always get the most aid. Also today, a political scientist argues that fringe candidates have a shot at the presidency – if they can get the support of their party. And, if you think Chris Christie is the first presidential candidate whose weight could make or break him, think again.

Gage Skidmore via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/e2VkE8

When President Lincoln was assassinated 150 years ago, many in the south publicly celebrated his death, but they weren’t the only ones cheering. On today’s show we’ll explore the myth of a country united in mourning.

Also today, a political scientist argues that fringe candidates are just as likely to win the presidency – if they can get the support of their party. And, if you think Chris Christie is the first candidate for whom weight is a presidential issue, think again.

Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts was remembered Monday by the president, vice president, and senators from both parties as a powerful force for liberal causes who could also reach across the aisle. 

Among the senators - past and present - who paid tribute to Ted Kennedy at the dedication of the new institute in his name was Trent Lott.

“Yes, a Republican from Mississippi,” he told the crowd gathered at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate.

LBJ Presidential Libary

From removing the "W" on all White House keyboards at the start of the Bush administration to launching a fake Indian attack on American soldiers, the commander-in-chief has been both the subject and the perpetrator of some serious pranks. In honor of April Fools' day, we map out the best presidential pranks that you may have not heard of .

Listen to Virginia's interview with Brady Carlson about White House pranks below. 

1. Lyndon B. Johnson's Sinking Convertible

Wikimedia Commons

We’ve seen this dance before: presidential hopefuls stumping in New Hampshire. On today’s show, we’ll talk to the official candidate from the Transhumanist Party who says we need a new political party and new tactics for the issues of our time.

Then, Jackie Robinson’s major league debut was an obvious, watershed moment in America’s troubled racial history. But we’ll look at a lesser known moment for American civil rights: breaking NASA’s color barrier and the story of the first African Americans in the space program.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Brother magneto via Flickr CC

Senators have passed a bill requiring public schools to continue teaching cursive and multiplication tables. The bill is aimed at making sure schools maintain those skills as schools adopt new standards and incorporate more technology in the classroom.

The Senate passed the bill on a voice vote Thursday and it will now be sent to the Senate Finance Committee.

UIC / Flickr Creative Commons

We will check in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about some of the top stories in politics this month: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stirs the political pot with his address to Congress this week, a last minute deal kicks the funding can down the road for the Department of Homeland Security, and President Obama makes good on his veto threat for the Keystone Pipeline.

GUEST:

Democratic Party Dynamics Heading Into 2016

Feb 25, 2015
DonkeyHotey / Flickr/CC

Although attention has been focused on the GOP field of presidential hopefuls, there are also interesting developments among Democrats, including unflagging efforts among progressives to convince the seemingly unmoved Senator Elizabeth Warren to run.  We’ll look at these dynamics in the context of policy debates within the party.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Florida US Senator Marco Rubio is in New Hampshire today. It’s part of a two day visit that’s largely seen as an early campaign trip of sorts by a political figure hoping to win the Republican Party’s presidential nomination in 2016.

Rubio has made a number of moves ahead of an expected presidential bid – he’s hired staff in New Hampshire, and he’s also used his political action committee to donate money to state and local officials and candidates, in this state and others that hold early primaries and caucuses.

Nine of the 13 North Country representatives voted to kill a bill that would be taken tax dollars away from Planned Parenthood.

As NHPR reported House Bill 677 would have stopped sending tax dollars to the organization. It’s already illegal in the state to use public funds for abortions, but some lawmakers still believe that’s how the money is being spent.

Reporter Dan Balz and columnist E.J. Dionne are in the state for an award ceremony at UNH Law.  We’ll get their thoughts on how political coverage has changed, especially of events such as the New Hampshire primary, but also what they hope won’t change in terms of ethics and standards.

GUEST:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The owner of the state’s largest chain of pain clinics would be forced to forfeit his financial interest in the practice if legislation pending in the House becomes law.

House Bill 517 would require physicians who lose their licenses to practice to cut their ownership ties to any health-care facilities.

The lead sponsor, Republican Rep. Don Leeman of Rochester, said the bill is aimed at one of the state’s most visible medical practices: Dr. O’Connell’s Pain Care Centers, Inc.

Carol Robidoux for NHPR

With less than a year to go before the 2016 New Hampshire primary, the Granite State is starting to see more and more visits from potential hopefuls – so far mostly on the Republican side.

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