Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

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Republican Jack Flanagan says he’s running again for New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District seat.

Flanagan served three terms in the New Hampshire House beginning in 2010, eventually rising to Majority Leader. In 2016, he sought higher office, but the 59 year old from Brookline finished 12 points behind Jim Lawrence in the GOP primary.

He’s jumping back in the mix, now, though, ready to take on incumbent Democrat Annie Kuster.

Political Speechwriting, Wishbones, & Every Body Yoga

May 19, 2017
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On today's show:

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On today's show:

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On today's show:

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On today's show:

Jason Moon for NHPR

Tuesday saw a collision of two great New Hampshire traditions: nor’easters and town meeting day. They might not seem like the best pairing, but as NHPR’s Jason Moon reports the two found a way to coexist.

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On today's show:

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On today's show: 

Episode 6: The National Security Council

Feb 10, 2017

What's the purpose of the National Security Council? When was it created? Who serves on it? And why is Steve Bannon's appointment to its principals committee such a big deal? Former NSC member Stephen Sestanovich helps answer those questions.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Officials with the state University System are registering their disappointment with Governor Chris Sununu’s proposal not to increase state funding for New Hampshire’s public universities.

The University System of New Hampshire requested an increase of about 12 million dollars over the next two fiscal years. They said the increase would allow them to keep tuition flat for in-state students.

Episode 5: Calling Your Congressperson

Feb 9, 2017
Logan Shannon

We're often urged to call our elected representatives to voice opinions on the issues, but what happens after that call is made?  Where does the message go? And do those calls ever sway decisions?  In this episode of Civics 101, we go into a congressional representative's office to find out.

Episode 4: How to Amend the Constitution

Feb 2, 2017
Logan Shannon / New Hampshire Public Radio

It’s been 25 years since the last constitutional amendment was ratified. How hard is it to change our most sacred document? We discover that there are not one, but two ways to amend the constitution – and one of them has never been used. Walter Olson, senior fellow of the Cato Institute explains that the founders didn’t exactly spell the process out clearly.

Logan Shannon

You've probably heard the term "comment period", but do you know what it means? What exactly happens when a government agency opens a proposed rule to public comment?  And do these comments ever sway decision making? Today, a look into the notice and comment rule making procedure. 

1.30.17: Civics 101 & End of Life Care for Kids

Jan 30, 2017
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The Constitution grants the press freedom to hold elected officials feet to the fire. How does the White House Press Corps do it?  Today, Civics 101 gets a lesson from a master, NPR's Senior White House Correspondent Scott Horsley.

Also today, hospice care is increasingly a choice for end-of-life care. What does it mean for lives that have just begun? We'll hear about an option that's so far been unthinkable - hospice care for terminally ill kids.

Eugene Kaspersky via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rBHFRr

When confronting transphobia, what's the best way to encourage understanding? How about a face-to-face discussion? Today, a study follows a group of door-to-door canvassers, and quantifies what we probably know instinctively - conversation is an effective tool for empathy and persuasion.

Plus, just because you saw The West Wing 10 years ago, does not mean you understand how government works. And that's ok. Today we introduce Civics 101 to untangle the fundamentals you learned in school and probably forgot - like what exactly does a Chief of Staff do?

1.05.17: Presidential Kids, Half Wild, & 10MWW

Jan 5, 2017
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The framers of American democracy rejected monarchy and its tradition of passing power through bloodline ...that has not stopped presidents past from relying on their kids. Today, Brady Carlson on first children who've made presidential politics a family business. 

Also today, hold-outs, hippies, haves and have-nots live side-by-side in a collection of stories set in Vermont...not the picture postcard version.

Plus, the 10-Minute Writer's Workshop talks with a longtime copy writer for the LL Bean catalog.  

Sarah Joy via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/cNCrSo

The Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court, the Paris Agreement. The Trump administration is sure to bring lots of changes, among them: White House decor. On today’s show we’ll take a historic tour of how first families have put their stamp on the executive mansion, including President Teddy Roosevelt, who created the west wing.

Also today, we'll speak with NASA's planetary defense officer about teaming up with FEMA, the Air Force and other government agencies for a simulation of what could happen if an asteroid crashed into a densely populated region -- and how they'd respond.

FLICKR/CC J. Stephen Conn

Democrats are doing some soul searching after this election season – not only because of their loss in the Presidential race but because they lost several governorships, including in New Hampshire, capping several years of state-level losses nationwide.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Governor-Elect Chris Sununu will officially cut ties with Waterville Valley Ski Resort on Dec. 31 – just a few days before he’s set to officially step into his role as governor.

Allegra Boverman

Governor-elect Chris Sununu sat down with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley Thursday for his first interview with NHPR since last week's election.

Listen to the full interview here, or read some excerpts from the interview below that will be added throughout the morning.

One of the first decisions you made since the election has to do with your transition team.

brooklyntheborough via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5RyRoi

It's here - the day of reckoning for the most bitter, acrimonious, controversial election in recent memory. But not, it might be a relief to know, in American history. Today, some historical perspective on contentious elections with Brady Carlson: and spoiler alert - our democracy survived.

Then we'll check in with transhumanist presidential candidate Zoltan Istvan who is just one of the nineteen hundred people who decided to run for president this year. We'll talk to him about what it was like to be on the campaign trail for over a year and what he learned.

Michael Brindley

The presidential campaign is usually an opportunity every four years for students to study democracy in real time. But, by all accounts, this campaign has been anything but normal.

The adult themes and harsh rhetoric have been especially challenging for educators, who’ve had to figure out how to address these subjects in the classroom.

NHPR Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with educators across New Hampshire to see what’s different about teaching the presidential campaign this year.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In the race for the U.S. Senate seat, Republican incumbent Senator Kelly Ayotte and her Democratic challenger, Governor Maggie Hassan, weigh in on a host of issues around business and the economy, as well as topics of importance to New Hampshire voters. The Exchange's Laura Knoy, NHPR Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, and NHBR Editor Jeff Feingold  pose questions at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at St. Anselm College.

Steven Depolo: Flickr

Before the final presidential face-off on Wednesday, we evaluate the structure and history of debating, from format to questions to the moderator's role.  Also, we look at how debates this election cycle measure up to debates past, and the big question: whether these events actually influence voters.


Andrew Turner via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/pU5n2J

There’s a new wrinkle in the universal law: "What goes up, must come down." As attempts to regulate drones grow, a new arms race is afoot to develop technology that can land or destroy non-compliant or wayward drones.

And whether it's attending a rally with a parent, or absorbed through TV commercials and yard signs, kids get exposed to the unseemly side of American politics. So, how and when, should parents encourage, shape, or inform civic engagement? A teacher and a blogger weigh in on how to navigate the murky waters of this election cycle.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

You didn’t have to look much farther than the title of the campaign’s primary night party – billed as a “general election kickoff” – to know that Colin Van Ostern’s campaign was feeling pretty good about its chances heading into Tuesday.

And by the time the results started coming in, that description ended up being on point after all.

Ryan McGuire / http://gratisography.com/

Emily Post said: "Never talk about politics or religion.” But with candidates so divisive, and voters so impassioned, it's tough to follow that particular bit of advice. On today’s show, a polite guide to political conversation. First tip? Know what you're trying to accomplish.

Later in the show, we'll look at why Chicago is still paying for its failed bid to host the 2016 Olympics, and talk to the author of a new book who traced the tracks of extreme skier Doug Coombs, from earning his chops on New Hampshire's slopes to his tragic death on a mountain in France.

Politics in Hip Hop, Sleepover Podcast, & Twinkies

Jul 22, 2016
Jenn Durfey via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8VUiJf

Since it's early days, hip hop have critiqued oppressions both political and economic - while flashing their own wealth and bravado. Donald Trump became a symbol of the latter, but recent mentions of him in hip hop have become much less positive during his campaign for president in the 2016 election. 

Plus, a few years ago, one of America's most beloved snack cakes was in danger of disappearing forever - until investors swooped in and saved the day. What started out as a rescue mission quickly evolved into a business strategy, and resulted in substantial changes to the brand. How are we preserving the mythical, magical Twinkie.

freddiefraggles via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bqvjLy

Since it's early days, hip hop have critiqued oppressions both political and economic - while flashing their own wealth and bravado. Donald Trump became a symbol of the latter, but recent mentions of him in hip hop have become much less positive during his campaign for president in the 2016 election. 

And, we’ll talk with a computer scientist who will forever be remembered not for his AI research, but as inventor of the emoticon. Plus, a writer attends her first autopsy, and says Hollywood gets it all wrong.

The smartphone game Pokémon Go has quickly become one of the most-used apps in the country. Now a political advocacy group in New Hampshire is hoping to coopt some of that enthusiasm.

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