Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

A Republican Re-boot

Mar 28, 2013

The Grand Old Party recently released a sweeping report on strategies for the next big election.  It’s been described as a hard hitting manifesto for the GOP, addressing problems ranging from a failure to attract younger voters and minorities, to a major re-vamp of the way the party chooses its President nominee.  We’ll find out what Granite State Republicans and state political analysts think.

Guests:

Thirty years ago, Corrections Corporation of America opened its first private prison. As demand for border patrol increased over the decades, so has its earnings. Last year, CCA brought in $1.7 billion dollars in revenue – a quarter of which came from government agencies enforcing immigration policy and incarcerating non-citizens in the US. Lee fang is Reporting Fellow with the Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute. He probed the connection between prison profits and stiffer immigration policies and came up with some unsettling answers.

Thirty years ago, Corrections Corporation of America opened its first private prison. As demand for border patrol increased over the decades, so has its earnings. Last year, CCA brought in $1.7 billion dollars in revenue – a quarter of which came from government agencies enforcing immigration policy and incarcerating non-citizens in the US. Lee fang is Reporting Fellow with the Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute.

The casino proposal faces its first major vote this week, is expected to pass in the Senate; the gas tax comes before the House Ways & Means Committee; medical marijuana legislation may have new life with Governor Hassan in the corner office; the House works on a revised budget.

The New Hampshire House votes this week on whether to raise the gas tax for the first time since 1991; considerations over this proposed tax and expanded gambling will affect implementation of the governor's budget.

jendubin via Flickr Creative Commons

Though political parties have long been responsible for drawn-out decision making in Congress, Michael Lind, writer and Salon columnist, believes that geography has also served as a formidable catalyst for inter-American dispute. Michael joins us to talk about his recent article for Salon, “The White South’s Last Defeat,” where he suggests that the root of the problem isn’t traced to the left or right, but rather, points north and south.

It’s the first State of the Union of President Obama's second term, and a major opportunity for him to set the agenda for the next four years…from jobs to reviving the economy.  But the President will have to bring Congress along with that agenda and that might not be easy. We’ll listen back to parts of the speech, talk about where there may be agreements and what the major roadblocks might be?

Guests

Dante Scala - Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of New Hampshire. He tweets @graniteprof.

In most cases, New Hampshire’s representatives in Congress have kept the state’s more open approach to gun ownership and gun rights during debates in Washington. There are exceptions, though, and they may tell us something about the state's role in today’s high profile national debate over gun violence.

Taking a look at how Governor Maggie Hassan handled her first weather-related test in the recent storm and what may be coming up in her budget proposal, being introduced on Thursday; Representative Annie Kuster's tax delinquency troubles.

The Local Government Center looks to replace its executive director; a look at bills that are coming down the pipe, including a bill to allow businesses to receive tax credits for donating private and home school scholarship funds, and a repeal of the Voter ID law.

The New Hampshire Republican Party voted this past Saturday and chose former Congressional candidate Jennifer Horn to be their latest chairperson; and a repeal of the "Stand Your Ground" law comes up before committee in the House of Representatives.

New Hampshire Republicans are set to choose their new leaders; Governor Hassan prepares her budget proposal, amidst debate over increased gambling; David Campbell's projection to raise infrastructure funds through an increase to the gas tax and vehicle registration fees; and the House looks at N.H.'s "Stand Your Ground" law.

Yesterday, President Barack Obama took his second oath of office for his second term and outlined his vision for the next four years.  Obama borrowed heavily from the Constitution in his speech and gave a hefty nod to Dr. Martin Luther King on his observed birthday.  Now the work begins.  We'll play excerpts of his speech and try to read between the lines as to what Obama hopes his second term may accomplish.

Guests:

The legislature starts hearing bills this week. On the agenda are Medicaid expansion, straight ticket voting, 911-related immunity; off the table is an education funding amendment

A look at the inaugural address of Governor Maggie Hassan. The N.H. House opens with a fight over guns, and lawmakers begin thinking about the next state budget.

The leaders appointed by the newly elected state Legislature Wednesday are familiar faces.

We sit with New Hampshire Governor John Lynch, as he prepares to leave the state’s “corner office”.  We’ll look back with him, at his achievements, his challenges, and what advice he’d impart to Governor-elect Maggie Hassan.  Our broadcast is in partnership with New Hampshire Public Television. 

Guest

  • Governor John Lynch - New Hampshire's 80th Governor

Early on, predictions were that this twenty-ten U.S. Supreme Court decision would lead outside groups to play an outsized role in our elections, by allowing unlimited political spending.  But now, some question how big an impact Citizens United really had.  We’ll look at this debate in New Hampshire. 

Guests

ctj71081 via Flickr Creative Commons

In the aftermath of the election, talk of secession is stirring in every State in the Union. The first petition came out of Louisiana the day after the election. A few months earlier, the secessionist sentiments of the Old South were stirring right here in the Great North.

Now that the elections are over, It’s now the number one topic on Capitol Hill. If the parties can’t agree on debt reduction, we’ll see tax increases and spending cuts that many predict could slide us into recession. In New Hampshire, thousands of jobs are said to be on the line. We’ll talk about efforts to avoid this, why some say going over the cliff may not be as damaging as feared and what each scenario could mean for the Granite State.

Guests

I am I.A.M. via Flicker Creative Commons

Canada, as the old Robin Williams joke goes…"is like a really huge loft apartment above a really great party.” Americans tend to think of Canada as a punch line…or the mystical country where healthcare is free and Justin Bieber came from.

The New Hampshire GOP’s heyday appears to be over for now, with Democrats gaining seats in the state Senate, winning a majority in the House, and taking the corner office. This follows a rancorous period of governing and campaigning …attack ads, finger pointing and name calling. So, how do we move on from here?  Today we'll talk with party members and see if we can all 'get along'.

Guests

betsythedevine via Flickr Creative Commons

Unprecedented spending by Super PACs has voters feeling deluged by 2012 campaign ads.

478: Red State Blue State

Nov 3, 2012
Design by Isaac H. on Customink.com

Politics have divided our country to the extent that the two sides not only disagree on the solutions to the country’s problems, they represent two different realities. This week we hear from people who are intimately familiar with this rift. They’ve lost friends. They’ve become estranged from family. They've watched civility cede to skirmishes. Our political civil war and its consequences: a special pre-election episode.

Prologue

We answer any final questions you have before you go to vote.  From debates, to political ads to stories and shows on NHPR, you’ve been given a lot of information, but maybe there’s a topic you haven’t heard much about or that one question that may sway you to one side or another. Today a panel of experts joins us to give you any final information you need before Election day.

Guests

We sit down with Second District Congressional candidate Ann McLane Kuster.  The Hopkinton Democrat is trying for a second time to unseat Republican Charlie Bass.  The two part ways on just about every major issue, from health care to federal debt and Kuster has tried to chip away at the moderate image Bass projects while he has calls her a partisan liberal.  Today we talk with Ann McLane Kuster on the issues and why she says she's the best next person for the job.

Guest

Issue of the Week: The Economy

Nov 1, 2012
Flickr - Images of Money

Our issue of the week series concludes with economic policy.  No matter who wins office both nationally and in New Hampshire, they’ll face enormous budget challenges from the so-called “fiscal cliff” in Washington to tax and spending decisions in the Granite State.  And these actions will affect the broader economy.  We’ll look at the candidates’ positions.  

Guests

The Birkes via Flickr Creative Commons

The freakishly robust weather phenomenon now known as Superstorm Sandy has left millions without power and billions of dollars in damage in its wake…and is still moving westward across the country. We wondered whether a tragedy of this scale, a week before a presidential election that is still too close to call, could affect the outcome.  So, we turn to political scientist Dean Spiliotes for some perspective.

League of Women Voters of California via Flickr Creative Commons

Next week, voters will take to the polls to elect the next president of the United States.  Watching the process will be a number of observers from all sides of the political process.

After last night President Obama and Governor Romney have squared off three times along with one event starring the VP candidates.  Lots of issues have been covered from the economy to foreign policy and many times the tone was contentious.  We’ll look at who won these debates…who may have received a 'bump' from them and how we’ll continue to hear the themes that were raised up until election day. 

Guests

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