Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

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Earlier this year, Melinda Gates of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced an initiative to invest billions of dollars into increasing contraceptive access for women.  Anybody with a mailbox or cable subscription knows it’s a somewhat risky move: whether we’re talking about contraceptives, abortion rights, or funding for Planned Parenthood, women’s issues have been front and center throughout the long election season.  We wanted to know more about the collision of philanthropy and politics, and take a general look at the state of philant

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Mitt Romney is pouncing on a post-debate bounce that has him polling  neck-in-neck with the President. This may be the brand re-boot that eluded the Romney campaign after the RNC in Tampa.  Pat Griffin has kept a close watch on Romney’s rising and falling campaign since the primary. Pat is a veteran ad-man and GOP consultant and  strategist.

For a long time, 'middle class' meant 'comfortable'.  It was a place to strive for and once there, it meant a stable job, a nice home and secure retirement.  But a recent study by the Pew Research Center describes a 'Lost Decade' of the Middle Class, finding this groups to be fewer, poor and gloomier due to the economic crisis.

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The ads are constant, the sums are staggering.  In the presidential race, spending has crossed the half-billion dollar mark.  State races meanwhile have seen an influx of big money from outside groups. The ads have ranged from tough to downright zany, even with zombies making an appearance. We look at the latest commercials and whether they’re effective.

Guests: 

John Carroll: assistant professor of mass communication at Boston University with a background in advertising and media. His blog is Campaign Outsider.

jayneandd via Flickr/Creative Commons - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jayneandd/4450623309/in/photostream/

This past weekend in New Hampshire was full of two things that NHPR's Keith Shields follows very closely: politics and marathons.

Shields is executive producer of The Exchange and a 27 time marathoner. He joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to – pardon the pun – run through the intersection of marathon culture and political culture, up to and including this election.

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Part 1: The Bad Science of the Left/Tweeting Political Poems

Think the right has cornered the market on denying science? No way, says Alex Berezow. He has a Ph.D. in microbiology and is co-author of the book Science Left Behind: Feel Good Falacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left. 

and

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New forensic evidence may confirm what many suspected behind-the-scenes: that the US and Israel conspired earlier this year to target Iran with the espionage malware “Flame”. Dan Goodin is Security Editor at Ars Technica and he's closely followed the unfolding story.     

Part 1: Big Fundraiser Flame-Out, Circa 1884

Walt McDougall, New York World, Oct. 30, 1884.

Mitt Romney’s campaign is trying to contain blow back from a secretly recorded video at a $50,000-a-plate fundraiser. With less than fifty days until the election, Romney’s leaked comments, in which he dismisses 47% of the country as “dependent on government,” is dominating political coverage at a time when Romney is already down in the polls. It may be little relief to Romney staffers to know that there is an historical precedent to this media debacle.

Beer Politics

Sep 17, 2012
cizauskas via Flickr Crative Commons

Here at home, both campaigns are working hard to brand their candidate as more relatable, more quintessentially American.  It’s a mission that involves lots of visits to diners, burger joints, and county fairs.  But when it comes to looking folksy, the President has one advantage that GOP nominee Mitt Romney just can’t swallow.  Producer Taylor Quimby reports.

Check out the White House Beer brewing process and the recipe for the beer here:

The U.S. Justice Department recently approved our law requiring photo identification…not for today’s primary, but beginning with November’s general election. Supporters say an ID is needed to combat voter fraud – but others say it will disenfranchise some voters. We look at what to expect, and how the requirements will change over time.

Guests

  • David Scanlon – New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State..His office oversees state elections.

We'll also hear from

Last week, the Justice Department approved New Hampshire's new law requiring voters to present a valid photo ID at the polls, or to sign an affidavit attesting to their identity in order to vote. Josh Rogers, NHPR’s Senior Political Reporter, is here with more on what New Hampshire voters can expect. 

and

sameold2010 via Flickr Creative Commons

Think the right has cornered the market on denying science? No way, says Alex Berezow. He has a Ph.D. in microbiology and is co-author of the book Science Left Behind: Feel Good Falacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left.

Courtesy Megan Saffell

The Republicans came to Tampa; then the Democrats came to Charlotte.

Now, with the conventions behind them, both parties have come to New Hampshire.

President Obama held his first post-convention campaign event in Portsmouth, before flying to Iowa. Mitt Romney, meanwhile, started the day in the Buckeye State and holds a rally at Holman Stadium in Nashua Friday evening.

NHPR’s Josh Rogers was on hand for the president's event; he joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about what he saw and heard.

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StateImpact's Amanda Loder discusses the economic proposals of main Democratic gubernatorial contenders Jackie Cilley and Maggie Hassan with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley.

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Sidewalk chalking, long a staple of street artists and hop-scotch players, has resulted in the arrests of 50 people in 17 American cities. Josh Harkinson is a staff writer for Mother Joneshe’s been following the arrests and the emergence of a popular new form of protest.

"The Chalking 8"— drew anti-cop slogans on the wall of the police station in Manchester, New Hampshire:

True, False, Or Pants On Fire?

Aug 31, 2012

Campaign season is in full swing.  You know it by the TV ads and campaign signs … and by the return of PolitiFact’s Truth-O-Meter.  PolitiFact New Hampshire is a partnership of The Telegraph in Nashua and the national PolitiFact.com., a project of the Tampa Bay Times.  The goal is to help you find the truth in politics.  They research candidates’ statements and then rate their accuracy on the Truth-O-Meter.   

And every week on Morning Edition, we’ll check in with the Telegraph’s managing editor for content, Jonathan Van Fleet about the most recent rulings.

Photo by Mallory Benedict/PBS NewsHour / <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/newshour/7891799906/in/photostream/">flickr</a>

New Hampshire delegates at the Republican National Convention in Florida say Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan's plan to overhaul Medicare is an asset.

If there was ever any question whether Congressman Paul Ryan is beloved by the Republican base, doubts were put to rest last evening.

2012 RNC

The presence of the Granite State has already been felt in Tampa -  an address from U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte, a speech from Hudson business owner Jack Gilchrist,  and the endorsement of our First in the Nation primary status.  We’ll talk with New Hampshire Republicans attending the convention about their take on major speeches, Mitt Romney’s candidacy, and the GOP platform.

Guests:

Beverly Bruce, State Finance Chair of the Mitt Romney for President campaign in New Hampshire.

Tune-in to New Hampshire Public Radio and check back online tonight as we continue to broadcast live NPR coverage from the Republican National Convention in Tampa. Join us from 8 - 11 pm.

King by Rocky via Flickr Creative Commons

Whether heralded as awesome, a distraction, or temporary attention-grabber, social media may not be the be-all, end-all of communication today. People still share their opinions and desires to each other via our favorite method…word of mouth. That’s according to the Keller Fay Group, a research and consulting company founded by Ed Keller and Brad Fay.

Chris Matthews is best known for his opinionated and combative style on his MSNBC program, "Hardball with Chris Matthews."

What's lesser known is that he's a former print journalist, was a long-time aide to Tip O'Neill, and that he grew up in an Irish Catholic family...of Republicans. All this played no small part in sewing the seeds of his admiration for a man he'd later write two books about, John F. Kennedy.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

Speaking in the sweltering gymnasium of Windham High School, Mr. Obama told a crowd of 2300 that the policies of Mitt Romney and Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan would benefit the rich and hurt the middle class. Mr. Obama argued that under the budget supported by Ryan, Romney would pay less than 1 percent of his income in taxes. The President also said Romney’s plans would raise taxes on middle class families by $2000 a year.   

The 2012 Veepstakes

Aug 10, 2012

Its the other big 'sporting' event this summer. Many are playing the guessing game, as to who his second in command might be, and lots of names are being tossed about as possible contenders, including a certain Junior U.S. Senator from New Hampshire.  We’ll look at this process, what it means for the Romney campaign, and who your choice would be.

Guests:

In his many years analyzing American opinions, Frank Newport, Editor-in-Chief at Gallup, has noticed a growing and sharper political divide in this country, even for a nation that was founded on partisanship.  We’ll talk about these trends, the demographic and cultural forces behind them, and why we still say we want compromise.

Guest:

Since the time of our founding, we’ve had the debate over the separation of church and state.  And this election year, this theme is emerging again,  in terms of contraception coverage,  public prayer and policies regarding same-sex couples.  We’ll focus in on this often blurry line and how it’s being discussed today.

Guests

C. Young Photography, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 29. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Photo Credit Premshree Pillai, Via Flickr Creative Commons

America’s blackout boom—our national electric grid is badly in need of an upgrade, as power outages are seemingly becoming the norm, especially with the onset of extreme heat and increasingly inclement weather. This has many people wondering why the power industry seems to be lagging behind when it comes to innovations to keep the lights on, and how politics plays a part in stagnating investment into renewable energy and smarter grid infrastructure.

Courtesy photo

We launch our coverage of New Hampshire’s gubernatorial primaries with Democratic candidate Maggie Hassan. An Exeter business attorney, Hassan was elected to the state Senate in 2004 and served as Senate Majority Leader. We’ll talk with Hassan about her candidacy, including why she’s the only democrat in this race to take the pledge against broad-based taxes.

Democratic Representative Terie Norelli just completed perhaps her most difficult session ever…outnumbered three-to-one by Republicans, a massive defeat that called into question her party’s approach and agenda for the state.  We’ll look at the session from the Democrats’ perspective, after we spoke yesterday with House Speaker Bill O'Brien.

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