Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

Yesterday, President Barack Obama took his second oath of office for his second term and outlined his vision for the next four years.  Obama borrowed heavily from the Constitution in his speech and gave a hefty nod to Dr. Martin Luther King on his observed birthday.  Now the work begins.  We'll play excerpts of his speech and try to read between the lines as to what Obama hopes his second term may accomplish.


The legislature starts hearing bills this week. On the agenda are Medicaid expansion, straight ticket voting, 911-related immunity; off the table is an education funding amendment

A look at the inaugural address of Governor Maggie Hassan. The N.H. House opens with a fight over guns, and lawmakers begin thinking about the next state budget.

The leaders appointed by the newly elected state Legislature Wednesday are familiar faces.

We sit with New Hampshire Governor John Lynch, as he prepares to leave the state’s “corner office”.  We’ll look back with him, at his achievements, his challenges, and what advice he’d impart to Governor-elect Maggie Hassan.  Our broadcast is in partnership with New Hampshire Public Television. 


  • Governor John Lynch - New Hampshire's 80th Governor

Early on, predictions were that this twenty-ten U.S. Supreme Court decision would lead outside groups to play an outsized role in our elections, by allowing unlimited political spending.  But now, some question how big an impact Citizens United really had.  We’ll look at this debate in New Hampshire. 


ctj71081 via Flickr Creative Commons

In the aftermath of the election, talk of secession is stirring in every State in the Union. The first petition came out of Louisiana the day after the election. A few months earlier, the secessionist sentiments of the Old South were stirring right here in the Great North.

Now that the elections are over, It’s now the number one topic on Capitol Hill. If the parties can’t agree on debt reduction, we’ll see tax increases and spending cuts that many predict could slide us into recession. In New Hampshire, thousands of jobs are said to be on the line. We’ll talk about efforts to avoid this, why some say going over the cliff may not be as damaging as feared and what each scenario could mean for the Granite State.


I am I.A.M. via Flicker Creative Commons

Canada, as the old Robin Williams joke goes…"is like a really huge loft apartment above a really great party.” Americans tend to think of Canada as a punch line…or the mystical country where healthcare is free and Justin Bieber came from.

The New Hampshire GOP’s heyday appears to be over for now, with Democrats gaining seats in the state Senate, winning a majority in the House, and taking the corner office. This follows a rancorous period of governing and campaigning …attack ads, finger pointing and name calling. So, how do we move on from here?  Today we'll talk with party members and see if we can all 'get along'.


betsythedevine via Flickr Creative Commons

Unprecedented spending by Super PACs has voters feeling deluged by 2012 campaign ads.

478: Red State Blue State

Nov 3, 2012
Design by Isaac H. on Customink.com

Politics have divided our country to the extent that the two sides not only disagree on the solutions to the country’s problems, they represent two different realities. This week we hear from people who are intimately familiar with this rift. They’ve lost friends. They’ve become estranged from family. They've watched civility cede to skirmishes. Our political civil war and its consequences: a special pre-election episode.


We answer any final questions you have before you go to vote.  From debates, to political ads to stories and shows on NHPR, you’ve been given a lot of information, but maybe there’s a topic you haven’t heard much about or that one question that may sway you to one side or another. Today a panel of experts joins us to give you any final information you need before Election day.


We sit down with Second District Congressional candidate Ann McLane Kuster.  The Hopkinton Democrat is trying for a second time to unseat Republican Charlie Bass.  The two part ways on just about every major issue, from health care to federal debt and Kuster has tried to chip away at the moderate image Bass projects while he has calls her a partisan liberal.  Today we talk with Ann McLane Kuster on the issues and why she says she's the best next person for the job.


Issue of the Week: The Economy

Nov 1, 2012
Flickr - Images of Money

Our issue of the week series concludes with economic policy.  No matter who wins office both nationally and in New Hampshire, they’ll face enormous budget challenges from the so-called “fiscal cliff” in Washington to tax and spending decisions in the Granite State.  And these actions will affect the broader economy.  We’ll look at the candidates’ positions.  


The Birkes via Flickr Creative Commons

The freakishly robust weather phenomenon now known as Superstorm Sandy has left millions without power and billions of dollars in damage in its wake…and is still moving westward across the country. We wondered whether a tragedy of this scale, a week before a presidential election that is still too close to call, could affect the outcome.  So, we turn to political scientist Dean Spiliotes for some perspective.

League of Women Voters of California via Flickr Creative Commons

Next week, voters will take to the polls to elect the next president of the United States.  Watching the process will be a number of observers from all sides of the political process.

After last night President Obama and Governor Romney have squared off three times along with one event starring the VP candidates.  Lots of issues have been covered from the economy to foreign policy and many times the tone was contentious.  We’ll look at who won these debates…who may have received a 'bump' from them and how we’ll continue to hear the themes that were raised up until election day. 


Matthew Burpee via Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this year, Melinda Gates of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced an initiative to invest billions of dollars into increasing contraceptive access for women.  Anybody with a mailbox or cable subscription knows it’s a somewhat risky move: whether we’re talking about contraceptives, abortion rights, or funding for Planned Parenthood, women’s issues have been front and center throughout the long election season.  We wanted to know more about the collision of philanthropy and politics, and take a general look at the state of philant

Adam Glanzman via Flickr Creative Commons

Mitt Romney is pouncing on a post-debate bounce that has him polling  neck-in-neck with the President. This may be the brand re-boot that eluded the Romney campaign after the RNC in Tampa.  Pat Griffin has kept a close watch on Romney’s rising and falling campaign since the primary. Pat is a veteran ad-man and GOP consultant and  strategist.

For a long time, 'middle class' meant 'comfortable'.  It was a place to strive for and once there, it meant a stable job, a nice home and secure retirement.  But a recent study by the Pew Research Center describes a 'Lost Decade' of the Middle Class, finding this groups to be fewer, poor and gloomier due to the economic crisis.

University of Denver via Flickr Creative Commons

The ads are constant, the sums are staggering.  In the presidential race, spending has crossed the half-billion dollar mark.  State races meanwhile have seen an influx of big money from outside groups. The ads have ranged from tough to downright zany, even with zombies making an appearance. We look at the latest commercials and whether they’re effective.


John Carroll: assistant professor of mass communication at Boston University with a background in advertising and media. His blog is Campaign Outsider.

jayneandd via Flickr/Creative Commons - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jayneandd/4450623309/in/photostream/

This past weekend in New Hampshire was full of two things that NHPR's Keith Shields follows very closely: politics and marathons.

Shields is executive producer of The Exchange and a 27 time marathoner. He joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to – pardon the pun – run through the intersection of marathon culture and political culture, up to and including this election.

sameold2010 via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: The Bad Science of the Left/Tweeting Political Poems

Think the right has cornered the market on denying science? No way, says Alex Berezow. He has a Ph.D. in microbiology and is co-author of the book Science Left Behind: Feel Good Falacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left. 


ccox888 via Flickr Creative Commons

New forensic evidence may confirm what many suspected behind-the-scenes: that the US and Israel conspired earlier this year to target Iran with the espionage malware “Flame”. Dan Goodin is Security Editor at Ars Technica and he's closely followed the unfolding story.     

Part 1: Big Fundraiser Flame-Out, Circa 1884

Walt McDougall, New York World, Oct. 30, 1884.

Mitt Romney’s campaign is trying to contain blow back from a secretly recorded video at a $50,000-a-plate fundraiser. With less than fifty days until the election, Romney’s leaked comments, in which he dismisses 47% of the country as “dependent on government,” is dominating political coverage at a time when Romney is already down in the polls. It may be little relief to Romney staffers to know that there is an historical precedent to this media debacle.

Beer Politics

Sep 17, 2012
cizauskas via Flickr Crative Commons

Here at home, both campaigns are working hard to brand their candidate as more relatable, more quintessentially American.  It’s a mission that involves lots of visits to diners, burger joints, and county fairs.  But when it comes to looking folksy, the President has one advantage that GOP nominee Mitt Romney just can’t swallow.  Producer Taylor Quimby reports.

Check out the White House Beer brewing process and the recipe for the beer here:

The U.S. Justice Department recently approved our law requiring photo identification…not for today’s primary, but beginning with November’s general election. Supporters say an ID is needed to combat voter fraud – but others say it will disenfranchise some voters. We look at what to expect, and how the requirements will change over time.


  • David Scanlon – New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State..His office oversees state elections.

We'll also hear from

Last week, the Justice Department approved New Hampshire's new law requiring voters to present a valid photo ID at the polls, or to sign an affidavit attesting to their identity in order to vote. Josh Rogers, NHPR’s Senior Political Reporter, is here with more on what New Hampshire voters can expect.