JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

This far into the campaign season, polls are generating lots of headlines. And if you live in New Hampshire, polling firms have likely been calling you and hundreds of other Granite Staters. But how do those polling firms find you? How do they choose their questions, and what do they do with your information?  For more on this, we turn to David Brooks who’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor, writer at GraniteGeek.org, and he’s moderating a Science Café panel discussion about this very subject Wednesday, October 21st at 6 p.m.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire’s independent streak is wider than ever and still growing. And that could make predicting the outcome of the 2016 presidential primary tougher than usual.

In political terms, increasing numbers of New Hampshire voters are showing their independence by declining to register with either major party. There are more of these “undeclared” voters in New Hampshire today than in any previous election cycle, and they are playing a bigger role in the state's primary elections.

The Politics of Polling Ahead of the Primary

Jul 28, 2015
IowaPolitics.com / Flickr CC

We look at how pollsters collect data and how that data affects the political process in this upcoming 2016 presidential primary.

nshepherd via flickr Creative Commons

When an unrecognizable number shows up on your phone during election season, chances are pretty good that the caller is someone taking a poll. On today’s show, turning the tables on pollsters. We’ll find out how they view polling accuracy and ethics for Election 2012.

Also today, the aging bunnies –  a group of Playboy centerfold models now in their 60s and 70s, reject the idea that they victimized, and remember a more tasteful time for the men’s magazine.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

2014 Rockefeller Center State of the State Poll

Dartmouth college has released its annual “State of the State” poll which finds support for a number of issues that didn’t make it out of the legislature this year.

The poll found statistically significant support for casino gambling, stricter gun laws, marijuana decriminalization, and a constitutional amendment prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. All of these issues generated legislation in New Hampshire this year but no policies will change.

In his many years analyzing American opinions, Frank Newport, Editor-in-Chief at Gallup, has noticed a growing and sharper political divide in this country, even for a nation that was founded on partisanship.  We’ll talk about these trends, the demographic and cultural forces behind them, and why we still say we want compromise.