Poverty

NH News
8:31 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Census Data: Fewer People Living In Poverty In N.H.

The U.S. Census Bureau is releasing new data that shows about 17,000 fewer people were living in poverty in New Hampshire in 2013 compared to the year before.

The 1.3 percent decline from about 128,500 people in poverty in 2012 to roughly 111,500 last year is the second sharpest drop in the nation, trailing only Wyoming's 1.7 percent decrease.

In New Hampshire, 8.7 percent of the population lives in poverty, compared with 15.8 percent nationally. The national rate in 2012 was 15.9 percent.

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Newscast
8:06 am
Tue July 22, 2014

N.H. Drops From First To Fourth In Kids Count Ranking

New Hampshire has slid to fourth place on a national ranking of places to raise children.

After decades in first place, the Granite State slid to fourth in the Kids Count Index, compiled by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, with Massachusetts, Vermont, and Iowa now holding the top spots.

The drop was attributed to an increase in child poverty, up from 9 percent to 16 percent between 2005 and 2012.

Increases in homes with single parents and where the parents lack secure employment also factored into the decline.

NH News
2:11 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

With No Federal Funding, Nashua After School Program Forced To Close

A group of students work on their homework at the after school program at Pennichuck Middle School. The program is shutting down after the state rejected the district's application to renew its federal funding.
Credit NHPR / Michael Brindley

The end of the school year in Nashua marks the end of the line for an after school program that organizers say was vital for the city’s middle school students.

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Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

The War On Poverty Starts With The Economy

Credit Hanibaael via Flickr Creative Commons

Fifty years ago this month President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed a nearly $950-million anti-poverty bill into law, creating Head Start, Medicare, Medicaid, and the Economic Opportunity Act. President Johnson envisioned a wealthy country where no child would go unfed or unschooled.  Five decades on, the official poverty rate has dropped, but childhood poverty is on the rise, as is income inequality. With no victory to declare, is it time for another war on poverty? Our guest is Angela Glover Blackwell. She responded to that question in New York Times’ “Room for Debate” series. She is founder and CEO of Policy Link, a national research and action institute which works to improve access and opportunity for people of color and residents of low-income community. 

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Word of Mouth
11:41 am
Wed January 15, 2014

The Los Angeles Poverty Department: The "Other" L.A.P.D. performs At Dartmouth This Weekend

Credit courtesy of lapovertydept.org

Los Angeles’ skid row has the nation’s largest concentration of homeless people. For nearly 30 years, this nexus of impoverished shelters and cardboard boxes has also been home to the Los Angeles Poverty Department, an arts and performing arts group comprised of people who live and work on skid row. The other LAPD makes theater about experiences common to people living in poverty – like addiction, incarceration, and the psychology of victimization – for stages all over the world. Their play “Hospital” follows the dysfunction of the American health care system, and is being performed at the Hopkins Center for the Arts on January 17th and 18thJohn Malpede is Founding Artistic Director, and Kevin Michael Key is a performer and Community Coordinator for the group.

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Word of Mouth
11:27 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Rethink 2014: The Psychology of Scarcity

Credit Sara Plourde

Scarcity is a kind of great equalizer. Whether it be less sleep, security, time, food, money or whatever a person needs, scarcity hijacks the mind, diminishes intelligence, and lowers resistance to temptation. Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton set out to find evidence for what happens to our minds when we have too little – and how scarcity shapes our choices and behaviors.  He's coauthor of the new book is Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Voting And The Cycle Of Poverty

Credit Wendy Longo photography / Flickr Creative Commons

Behind the numbers are the experiences of America's poor, which, more often than not, go unheard. This divide is the problem that N.H. writer and activist Dan Weeks addressed in the project he undertook last year, to travel around some of the poorest areas of the country by bus and see poverty close up, as well as the ways that it intertwines with a lack of political voice. Today we'll talk with him about the series of articles he wrote for The Atlantic on his trip and what he saw.

GUESTS:

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All Things Considered
5:05 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Child And Family Advocate Reflects On Decades Of Progress And Challenges

For more than 27 years, Mike Ostrowski has served as president of Child and Family Services of New Hampshire, an organization that serves some 15,000 children and families in New Hampshire each year.

He’s stepping down from that role as the year comes to a close, but before he does he joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson in the studio to share some of what he’s learned on the job.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Keene Community Kitchen Teaches Nutrition And Creative Cooking

Some years ago, Maria Dichtelmiller found herself unable to buy food and living in a shelter. She went to The Community Kitchen in Keene, a local food pantry.

While standing in line at the pantry, Maria noticed a chayote (a type of squash) had been sorted in with boxes of fruits. After pointing this out and explaining what a chayote was to the staff, they hired her as a volunteer. She now works at the Kitchen’s grain station and educates others on the value of food they might be unfamiliar with.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
10:02 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Urban Farming: A Bright Spot In The Collapse Of A Once Great City

Photo courtesy By Gerbriel Kamener and Sown Together

Detroit’s declaration of bankruptcy this summer opened up the floodgates for stories of its decline. Documentary films, photo essays, and articles reveal a once-proud American city, home to world’s highest-paid workers and a strong middle class, as a shell of its former self. Some residents are finding hope among the abandoned neighborhoods, crumbling municipal buildings, and rusting car factories that made the motor city hum.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Keene Community Kitchen Teaches Nutrition And Creative Cooking

Some years ago, Maria Dichtelmiller found herself unable to buy food and living in a shelter. She went to The Community Kitchen in Keene, a local food pantry.

While standing in line at the pantry, Maria noticed a chayote (a type of squash) had been sorted in with boxes of fruits. After pointing this out and explaining what a chayote was to the staff, they hired her as a volunteer. She now works at the Kitchen’s grain station and educates others on the value of food they might be unfamiliar with.

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Addressing Global Food Scarcity

According to Oxfam, the world’s poor spend three-quarters of their income on food. A survey by Save the Children found that 24 percent of families in India, 27 percent in Nigeria and 14 percent in Peru now have foodless days. Pictured: A young girl in India cries for food.
Credit Hemera Collection

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

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Word of Mouth
11:05 am
Tue March 5, 2013

The College Admissions Double Standard

Credit angelamaphone via flickr Creative Commons

In his first term, President Obama boosted Pell grants and reformed federal financial aid in hopes of increasing college access for low-income students.  Despite these efforts, there is another problem preventing the less privileged from getting an education – a disconnect between poor families, and the arcane bureaucracy surrounding the admissions process.

Sarah Carr is author of the new book Hope Against Hope: Three Schools, One City, and the Struggle to Educate America’s Children.”  An excerpt from that book featured in The Atlantic tells the story of one New Orleans high school’s efforts to bridge the admissions process gap.

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NH News
12:35 pm
Fri November 30, 2012

'Roadmap' Offers Solutions To Rise Of Child Poverty In N.H.

Increasing access to existing food resources, strengthening New Hampshire's food systems, and ensuring the economic security of children and families.

These were among the recommendations found in "Roadmap to End Childhood Hunger," a report issued this week by New Hampshire Hunger Solutions and the Children's Alliance of New Hampshire.

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Child Poverty
10:57 am
Thu September 20, 2012

N.H. Has Lowest Child Poverty Rate In U.S., But Growing Numbers Of Low-Income Kids

While child poverty in NH has remained steady, the broader, low-income bracket has grown since the recession hit.
Ulrica Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire has the lowest child poverty rate in the country.  That’s according to new numbers released by the Census Bureau. 

In the United States, the poverty line works out to less than $23,000 a year for a family of four—that means two parents and two children.  And fewer than one out of eight New Hampshire kids are living below that line.  That’s good news.  But Carsey Institute researcher Jessica Bean says the same family of four with even twice that income—close to $46,000—is still struggling.

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