Pregnancy

Thomas Hawk via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/gYYzoZ

There’s plenty of evidence that drug use during pregnancy can harm the fetus, but should using illicit substances while pregnant be a criminal offense? On today’s show, an unfiltered look at what happens when expectant mothers are jailed for drug use.

Then, from Mexican cartels to Isis, the rise in kidnappings globally adds up to a 1.6 billion dollar “hostage industry”. Later in the show a journalist attends “Hostage Camp”, where wealthy travelers learn how to survive a kidnapping.  

Granger Meador via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/cfu46W

When you hear about prison work programs, you think license plates or chain gangs – not buffalo milk cheese. On today’s show, we’ll look into the artisanal foods and other under-the-radar, prisoner-made products that line the shelves of stores across the country.

Then, in 1939 Rhett Butler stunned audiences when he uttered the now famous line in Gone with the Wind: “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn.” We’ll talk about the history of onscreen cursing, and how four letter words have come out of the shadows and into the mainstream.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Families First Health & Support Center

The state of New Hampshire is receiving nearly $4.8 million in grant money to support home wellness visits for young children and pregnant women.  Federal Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell announced the grant Thursday as part of $386 million awarded nationwide to support home visitation programs.  Burwell says the grant gives New Hampshire the flexibility to tailor its home visit programs to address the needs of the communities they serve.  The national Home Visiting Program currently serves about one-third of the counties in the country with high rates of low birth weights

Nico Nelson via Flickr CC

What do you really know about placentas? If you’re like the majority of people, the "tree of life" is probably pretty mysterious. Despite being vital to both maternal and fetal health, the National Institute of Child Health and Development says that the placenta is the “least understood human organ.” That’s starting to change as more scientists study the invasive organ, a pattern Denise Grady wrote about for the New York Times, but outside the laboratories people are taking the placenta into their own hands. Literally. So we asked: what are some of the most popular and strange things people are doing with their placenta?

Today we talked to Logan Hill of Los Angeles Magazine about his article “Fire in the Belly,” in which he explores the strategies utilized by TV execs when faced with a pregnant actress. From Lucille Ball to Kerry Washington, it is a challenge as old as, well, television. Listen to the segment here.

We thought this was such a great topic that we decided to compile our own list of amusing TV/real life pregnancies.

Kaytee Riek via flickr Creative Commons

According to the calendar, it’s still spring for a few more days, but some music critics have already anointed the song of the summer. Today on Word of Mouth we’ll reveal the warm-weather anthem you’ll be hearing all summer long. Plus, for soccer-loving countries, the World Cup inspires passion, patriotism, and songs, bad ones. We’ll listen to a selection of the worst songs also inspired by the World Cup, from around the world.

Listen to the full show and click Read More for individual segments.


Sandor Weisz / Flickr/CC

Due to cultural shifts and medical concerns, more women around the country, and especially in the Granite State, are deciding against having their babies in the hospital.  The state’s medical community is taking note- some with major concern- and others trying to work out new arrangements to accommodate this trend.

*PRI's radio program The World is doing a series on pregnancy and childbirth around the world

GUESTS: 

Rafael Viana Araujo via Flickr Creative Commons

You may be familiar with the ordeal of introducing children to broccoli and spinach.  Two new studies suggest that finicky eaters might have picked up their discriminating habit in the womb. Forget genetics, personal responsibility, and discipline. Your taste for junk food and soda may have a lot to do with how your mother satisfied her cravings.

Kristin Wartman, is a food, politics and health journalist. She recently wrote about the new science of food choices for the New York Times.

Group Prenatal Care Takes Root In New Hampshire

May 29, 2013

Just off from a circle of cushioned chairs, behind a privacy screen, Jessica Densmore greets patients inside a Cheshire Medical Center conference room, in Keene.

“Let’s take a listen and see if we can hear this baby today,” she says, positioning a fetal heart monitor.

Today’s mothers, ten in total,  are all between 22 and 29 weeks pregnant. They come once a month, and then every two weeks as due dates approach, for their Centering Pregnancy appointment: basically a group check-up.

The Baby Wait

Dec 17, 2012
Mr. Physics via Flickr Creative Commons

Since 1970, the average age of first-time parents has increased markedly, from twenty-one years-old to twenty-five. Now, many parents wait even longer to conceive, and science makes it possible with advances in fertility treatments. A new era of freedom for women and men looking to have children later in life is now more a reality than a possibility, and the consequences are becoming more apparent.

Ambernectar 13 via Flickr Creative Commons

Hospitals, advocates, and even formula manufacturers acknowledge that when it comes to newborns, “breast is best.”  And yet free samples of formula are ubiquitous inside many hospital walls – offered by nurses, doctors, or thrown in goodie bags for new mothers heading home after giving birth.  Now, some hospitals are calling for an in-house ban on free formula samples.  They say the relative ease of bottle-feeding may sway new nursing mothers to give

The Moth

Oct 10, 2012
Polina Sergeeva / Flickr

Saturday, Nov. 3 – Moth Radio Hour 1209

Last in a four-part report

Surrogacy is an idea as old as the biblical story of Sarah and Abraham in the book of Genesis. Sarah was infertile, so Abraham fathered children with the couple's maid. Today, there are many more options for people who want to grow their families — and for the would-be surrogates who want to help.

Macy Widofsky, 40, is eager to be a surrogate.

"I have very easy pregnancies. All three times have been flawlessly healthy, and I wanted to repeat the process," she says, "and my husband and I won't be having more children of our own."

First in a four-part report

On a sunny weekday morning, Diane Hinson pauses at the door of a generic office park in Northern Virginia. It's a routine work appointment for her, but a potentially life-changing event for her clients.

"I'm here today for the transfer of embryos," she explains.

Scientists have found one more reason that pregnancy and obesity can be a bad combination.

A new study in the journal Pediatrics suggests that moms who are obese or have diabetes are more likely to have a child with autism or another developmental problem.

The finding is "worrisome in light of this rather striking epidemic of obesity" in the U.S., says Irva Hertz-Picciotto from the MIND Institute at the University of California, Davis, one of the study's authors.

Two eras clash on Monday at the U.S. Supreme Court, when a law written in 1939 is applied to in vitro fertilization. At issue is whether children conceived through in vitro fertilization after the death of a parent are eligible for Social Security survivors benefits.

At least 100 such cases are pending before the Social Security Administration.

Dr. Adam Wolfberg had two daughters and another on the way when his wife, Kelly, went into labor. But this joyous occasion had come much too soon — Kelly was three months away from her due date. After just 26 weeks in the womb, their baby daughter Larissa entered the world by emergency cesarean section and was whisked into the neonatal intensive care unit of a Boston hospital. It was the same hospital where Wolfberg was doing his residency in obstetrics and gynecology, and his medical background turned out to be a mixed blessing.

For decades, scientists have thought that one of the big differences between men and women is that men can make children all their lives because men never stop making sperm. But scientific dogma said women aren't so lucky when it comes to their eggs.