Presidential Debates

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night. The NPR Politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is following along and will be annotating and fact-checking in real time.

GIF created using footage from NBC

The Democratic presidential candidates could have one final chance to debate before New Hampshire voters head to the polls.

AP / Flickr/CC

New dynamics have entered the GOP race, with terrorism and national security topping voters' concerns. And the race itself is shaking up, with a slightly smaller group of contenders and the party's establishment openly worried about the staying power of Donald Trump. We'll recap the debate highlights and dig into the issues. 

GUESTS:   

Paul Chenoweth via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5rmJLs

When it comes to stump speeches, presidential contenders want their words to resonate with as many voters as possible – which may explain why Donald Trump speaks to the public at a 4th grade reading level. Today, the strategy of simplicity. Then, they say charity begins at home - but can altruism go too far? We take a look at the complicated motivations behind the actions of extreme "do-gooders", and the strangely hostile reactions they sometimes face from the world around them.

Jeff Myers via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5UcE7V

When it comes to stump speeches, presidential contenders want their words to resonate with as many voters as possible – which may explain why Donald Trump speaks to the public at a 4th grade reading level. Today, the strategy of simplicity. Then, from speech to song…later in the show we go behind the glimmering façades and dance numbers to examine how movie musicals reflect American culture.

LAWRENCE OP VIA FLICKR CC http://bit.ly/1P6a1XJ

They say charity begins at home - but can altruism go too far? Today on Word of Mouth, a look at the complicated motivations behind the actions of extreme "do-gooders", and the strangely hostile reactions they sometimes face from the world around them. Plus, a historical look at presidential debates: Brady Carlson talks about how and when they became influential parts of the process, and remembers some noteworthy zingers and gaffes from decades past. 

Listen to the full show


Primary 2016: Foreign Policy on the Campaign Trail

Oct 29, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at what the candidates are saying about America’s role in the world: how to deal with terrorism and handle the numerous conflicts in the Middle East, what to do about fraught relations with Russia, China and North Korea, and how best to respond to the refugee crisis in Europe and conduct trade in the global area.

GUESTS:

The third GOP debate was a heavyweight match but with quick footwork and well-orchestrated jabs that were responded to with masterful cross-counters. The surprise? Trump wasn't the only one punching. Bush went after Rubio for missing Senate votes. Kasich said Trump's platform was "fantasy." In a recurring theme, Cruz attacked the media and the CNBC moderator. Carson, who's been rising in the polls, stayed above the fray. The candidates also staked out real positions: Cruz vowed to eliminate the IRS.

GIF created using footage from CNN

The Democratic party’s five major presidential candidates gathered in Las Vegas for their first debate Tuesday night.

But for all intents and purposes — as summed up by POLITICO and a good chunk of the mainstream media — it may as well have been billed as “the Hillary and Bernie Show.”

Primary 2016: First Democratic Presidential Debate

Oct 14, 2015
cnn.com

Five presidential candidates faced off in Las Vegas in the first of six debates. With much of the focus on Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders these months, it was a chance for lagging candidates Martin O’Malley, Jim Webb, and Lincoln Chafee to get in the fight. We’ll recap the top moments and dig into the issues.

GUESTS:

  • Wayne Lesperance – professor and director of Masters of Public Policy at New England College
  • Josh Rogers – senior political reporter and Editor at New Hampshire Public Radio
     
Michael Jolly / Flickr

The fight continues to add more debates to the Democratic presidential primary calendar. There's even now an official coalition in New Hampshire focused on bringing another debate to the Granite State before the February primary.

Cheryl Senter/NHPR

While Republican candidates for president have so far logged two debates (and one forum) this election cycle, Democrats are arguing over the timing and number of their own primary debates.

White House Photograph Courtesy Gerald R. Ford Library

Before Carter versus Ford, presidential debates weren’t considered a necessary part of the election process, but today, the debate stage is like the Roman Coliseum.

On today’s show, we’ll look at the history of zingers, gaffes, and memorable moments from behind the podium. Then, with a pool of candidates growing at a near exponential rate, debate planning has become a headache for the GOP. We’ll look at how party leaders and the media could take advantage of the enormous field.

The Debate Over Presidential Debates

Jun 8, 2015
Teresa / Flickr / Creative Commons

New TV network criteria stir controversy, as the field of contenders for the twenty-sixteen presidential election grows. We’ll look at how organizers are managing this large group of candidates, and the impact it has on campaign strategies of both prominent and lesser known politicians.

After last night President Obama and Governor Romney have squared off three times along with one event starring the VP candidates.  Lots of issues have been covered from the economy to foreign policy and many times the tone was contentious.  We’ll look at who won these debates…who may have received a 'bump' from them and how we’ll continue to hear the themes that were raised up until election day. 

Guests

Fact-Checking the Debates

Oct 23, 2012

bindersfullofwomen.tumblr.com

More Specifically: We're talking debate memes, and how they are made.

DonkeyHotey via Flickr Creative Commons

Last night, millions watched, listened, or otherwise followed last night’s the first debate between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney. Romney appears the clear winner on Twitter, in snap polls, and even in President Obama’s campaign. Yesterday we spoke to Laura Rochette, co-advisor of the debate team at St. Paul’s School, the prep school where Massachusetts Senator John Kerry got his debating chops.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

About 50 students and faculty members gathered at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at St. Anselm’s Wednesday night to watch the debate.

Michael Jolly / Flickr

In Denver, president Obama and republican nominee Mitt Romney faced off in the first of three forums. The focus was domestic policy - from jobs to taxes to federal debt. We're playing back some debate highlights, covering the major themes....and are including your thoughts in our conversation.

GUESTS:

Wayne Lesperance – professor of political science at New England College and director of the Center for Civic Engagement

President Obama and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, engaged Thursday night in a sometimes spirited, but always cordial, debate that got very technical at times.

It was the "corporate executive" (Romney) vs. the "government professor" (Obama) and the GOP nominee appeared to be "full of confidence and full of sales pitch," NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving says, while Obama put pressure on the Republican to explain what he would do as president.

NHPR  will air special coverage for all the presidential debates and the vice presidential debate on October 3, 11, 16 and 22.  In addition, WNYC Radio's "Swing State Radio Network"  in New York is providing a special one-hour live call-in show that will air from 8 - 9 p.m. before each debate specifically for the swing states. 

Oct. 3: First presidential debate on domestic policy

Jonathan Lynch

Members of Occupy New Hampshire returned to Manchester Saturday to demonstrate outside of the Republican Presidential Debate at St. Anselm's College and spread their message of economic inequality.

Nearly five months after Occupy New Hampshire’s last tents were torn down in Veteran’s Park, the ninety-nine percenters returned to Manchester to demonstrate against what they perceive to be growing economic inequality across the nation.