Presidents

The Enigma and Contradictions of Thomas Jefferson

Nov 7, 2016

For an Election Day broadcast, we go back to our country's founding with a recent book on Thomas Jefferson that challenges some of the cliches about our third president.  We talk with Annette Gordon-Reed, co-author of "Most Blessed of the Patriarchs," about Jefferson's life at Monticello, his sojourn in Paris, and his views on slavery and race. 


In his new book, Dead Presidents, NHPR's Brady Carlson unearths the offbeat and wacky ways we've memorialized our Commanders-in-Chief, from a laxative drink called Garfield tea to a game called Hooverball.

  This program was originally broadcast on 2/25/16.

Happy Father's Day

Jun 17, 2016
http://gph.is/1sHPC2C

5.30.16: Happy Memorial Day

May 30, 2016
Bill Dickinson via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/c6kur7

Each Memorial Day, the country comes together to remember the fallen – but history hasn’t always been so kind. When President Lincoln was assassinated, many publicly celebrated his death...and not just in the south. 

On today’s show, we’ll shatter the myth of a country united in mourning. Then, we'll look at why some important historical events go entirely unremembered – like the sinking of the Sultana, America’s deadliest maritime disaster. 

Listen to the full show:

Courtesy JimmyTingle.com

From Tina Fey’s "Sarah Palin" to Larry David’s "Bernie Sanders", politicians are red meat for comedians. But for some, impersonating a candidate isn’t enough. On today’s show, Boston comic Jimmy Tingle throws his hat in the ring - again!

Then, politicians have a long and storied past with music, from Bill Clinton playing saxophone on late night TV to Mike Huckabee playing bass in his band Capital Offense. But perhaps the most perplexing display of musical...uh...prowess: Bernie Sanders' folk album.

Also we’ve got another episode of the 10-Minute Writer’s Workshop with bestseller Marianne Williamson.

2.1.16: Dead Presidents & Killer Heels

Feb 1, 2016
Brady Carlson / bradycarlson.com

After Iowans caucus tonight, the candidates will be back in New Hampshire, making a case for why they deserve to be president. The job's got plenty of perks, but it also means giving over your life, and your death. On today’s show, from mountainside monuments to commemorative sandwiches, we'll explore how America remembers its dead presidents.

Also today, high heeled shoes: mocked, coveted, and symbolic to feminists and fashionistas. We'll learn about the history of high heel shoes and why they haven’t always been a symbol of feminine status.

Ventura County Democratic Party / Flickr/CC

From Adams to Kennedy to Bush and Clinton, our guest Stephen Hess says that politics as the “family business” is nothing new. In his book, he profiles eighteen of these political clans: how power passes on, how it can be lost, and why many Americans are so uncomfortable with this concept. 

GUESTS:

Gage Skidmore via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/e2VkE8

When President Lincoln was assassinated 150 years ago, many in the south publicly celebrated his death, but they weren’t the only ones cheering. On today’s show we’ll explore the myth of a country united in mourning.

Also today, a political scientist argues that fringe candidates are just as likely to win the presidency – if they can get the support of their party. And, if you think Chris Christie is the first candidate for whom weight is a presidential issue, think again.

2.16.14: Presidents' Day

Feb 16, 2015
WorldIslandInfo.com, Wystan, & U.S. Embassy New Delhi via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth celebrates Presidents’ Day with presidential portraits from Writers on a New England Stage. We’ll talk to three authors who took a deeper look into the complexities and motivations of American leaders throughout history.

 

randallbalmer.com

James Earl Carter Junior is better known to the world as Jimmy and to the nation as our 39th president.   Other images appear in our minds as well: a one-time peanut farmer, the man who struggled during his time in the White House and after his presidency, and a humanitarian and global peace maker.  But in a new book, Dartmouth professor Randall Balmer takes a new look at Carter., who he says ‘was capitulated to the nation’s highest office by an electorate weary of political corruption, and enamored, however briefly of Carter’s evangelical rectitude.”  But many who supported Carter’s religi

  

Have you hugged a President this week? Steve Wood has. As a card-carrying member of the Association of Lincoln Presenters, Wood assumes the garb, voice and character of the country’s 16th President to educate people about Lincoln’s life and legacy.

Image Credit: Bettmann/Corbis via TLC.com

Fifty-years ago, on November 22nd, President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was shot while traveling in his motorcade through Dallas. Kennedy was pronounced dead at 12:30 pm central time that day. By Monday, 45,000 letters of condolence had arrived at the White House. Two months later, nearly 800,000 had arrived -- addressed mostly to Jackie Kennedy and her family. Over the next two years, that number doubled. Handwritten, typed, and cabled, those letters captured the collective grief of the nation and the world and were then filed away for nearly forty six years.

Letters to Jackie, released in 2010, was a compilation of hundreds of those letters by history scholar, UNH professor, author and our guest Ellen Fitzpatrick.

Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy” is a new documentary based on her book and features a selection from those letters read by movie and theater actors. The special makes its television premiere on TLC this coming Sunday, November 17th.

 A conversation with historian and biographer A. Scott Berg about his new book, Wilson, recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth.

Writers on a New England Stage is a co-production of NHPR and The Music Hall.