Primary 2016

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was back in New Hampshire Friday. The GOP front-runner congratulated himself for skipping the GOP debate in Iowa and went after Republican rival Ted Cruz. 

Trump told a capacity crowd at a hotel ballroom that "in theory" he would have rather done the debate because he's leading, but believes his decision paid off.

"I took a chance and we did something, and I don't know the end result. I heard went we up but we did the right thing. We did the right thing because we did something great for veterans."

AP/John Minchillo

In the final week of the New Hampshire presidential primary, NHPR is taking a closer listen to how some of the candidates are pitching themselves to the state's voters – through their standard stump speech. We've taken a few key moments in a recent speech and marked up the sound in each clip - just click listen to see them roll out. 

Here's an annotated recording of a recent speech by Democrat Bernie Sanders, delivered January 14, 2016 at Dartmouth's Spaulding Auditorium. (You can hear the full speech using the player at the bottom of this story.)

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

John Kasich needs New Hampshire’s undeclared voters to surge to the Republican primary. Bernie Sanders would like to see those same voters pick the Democratic race.

Recent history shows either scenario is plausible.

But ongoing upheaval in the ranks of New Hampshire’s undeclared (or “independent”) voters makes it hard to know what (if any) direction they're moving over the long term. 

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign has a challenge ahead of it before Primary Day.

The Vermont senator gets some of his strongest support in New Hampshire from independents. But those same voters could, at the last minute, decide to cast a ballot in the Republican primary.

In this year's Republican presidential primary, much has been made about a division between insiders and outsiders. But in New Hampshire, perhaps the most intense battle is happening within that insider group. And as the primary campaign enters its final stage, the fight for the mainstream Republican vote is only growing more intense.

Sean Hurley

Kaitlin Clark, 11 years old and from North Woodstock, has been busy this winter. She's racing on the Lin-Wood School's ski team. She's in the debate club. And now she's got a new gig, as a Kid Reporter with the Scholastic News Press Corp. 

Bernie Sanders may be running an unconventional campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. But to close the sale with New Hampshire voters, he has put his money on a rather conventional means: television advertising.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

With the New Hampshire primary just two weeks, away every presidential campaign is turning towards a basic goal: make sure supporters turn out to vote. For GOP frontrunner Donald Trump the challenge is persuading the crowds who pack his rallies to actually show up on primary day.

It's a rare presidential candidate who tries to use tax policy to win voters' hearts.

But fiscal policy -- and tax reform in particular -- is an issue with the potential to have a real effect on voters’ finances, in their personal budgets or their businesses’ earnings. 

University of New Hampshire

Relatively new voters could play a significant role in this year's New Hampshire presidential primary.

That’s according to a new paper from the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey School of Public Policy, which looks at an influx of new residents and a rising tide of young voters, many of whom weren’t old enough to participate in past presidential primaries.

NHPR

It’s become a common theme: voters are anxious – about national security, income inequality, and a government they see as unable to confront the country’s problems. Campaigns have tapped into these sentiments, often striking an angry tone. We’ll explore the extent of this discontent – and whether it's exceptional to this campaign season.

GUESTS:

NHPR Staff

Every four years in New Hampshire, the presidential primary season is heralded by the flowering of lawn signs. And while yard signs are hardly the most innovative campaign technique available today, a new scientific study suggests these old-fashioned political tools can still have an impact.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump used a rally in Farmington to urge backers to turn out on primary day and show the world his campaign is a movement. 

Farmington is not a town that sees many would-be presidents.

Trump drew a crowd of more than 1000 to the town’s high school gymnasium.

Trump’s main message was straightforward: Get out and vote.

" Don’t worry about polls, because there is only one poll that counts, Feb 9th for you people and Feb 1st for Iowa."

Newspapers in the two early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire have been issuing candidate endorsements in an accelerating flurry in recent days. But do those endorsements even matter anymore?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.  

The weekend brought Hillary Clinton some endorsements from the Concord Monitor and Boston Globe. The Monitor had also endorsed Clinton in 2008; the Globe chose then-Senator Barack Obama. You’d have to see this as good news – perhaps needed good news -- for Clinton.

Rebecca Lavoie / NHPR

If you live in New Hampshire's North Country, or along the Vermont border, you’ve probably had a chance to meet the candidates. But that was then. Now, two or so weeks from Primary Day, the action is all down south.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sits down with Exchange host Laura Knoy and Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season, including health care, campaign finance, and foreign policy. 

You can watch the forum right here:

Kasich Talks Higher Ed Costs At Goffstown Event

Jan 25, 2016
Brady Carlson / NHPR

Republican John Kasich continues a stretch of more than a week of campaigning in New Hampshire.

At a town hall event Sunday in Goffstown, Kasich took questions on Social Security, climate change and education. He said to keep college costs down, students should be able to obtain more academic credits through high school and community college programs; that, he said, would enable many students to cut costs by three-quarters.  

Sara Plourde for NHPR

This week, Brady runs down this week's smack talk from the trail, seeks some help for his addiction to polls, and finds out why candidates flipped pancakes in Manchester. Plus, why is one of Donald Trump's Town Captains voting for Rand Paul?

Listen to the podcast here, or subscribe on iTunes:

In Bow, Bush Calls For Higher Ed Overhaul

Jan 24, 2016
Brady Carlson / NHPR

It's a busy weekend in New Hampshire for Republican presidential candidates. Among those on the trail this weekend: Jeb Bush. 

If you had to name a state where Donald Trump's political rise has caused the greatest disruption, New Hampshire would be a good pick. Trump has led every poll taken there since June — while tearing up the traditional Republican playbook for winning in New Hampshire.

Trump has avoided the retail politicking that most other campaigns view as a must-do in favor of large rallies. He has never even spent two days back to back in the state campaigning.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

During a four-day visit to New Hampshire, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz pitched a consistent message.

Cruz finished off his trip the same way he started, selling himself as the presidential candidate the establishment fears most.

"Because Cruz actually will stand, with the American people against the career politicians in both parties. "

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


Natasha Haverty

 With less than three weeks to go before the state’s presidential primary, a new poll from UNH shows Bernie Sanders leading with nearly twice as much support as rival Hillary Clinton. Today, former President Bill Clinton showed up to make his case for why that should change. 

Hillary Clinton dismissed a report that emails she sent on her private email server contained a high level of classified material.

Speaking to NPR's Ari Shapiro in San Antonio on Wednesday, the Democratic presidential candidate continued to maintain that she "never sent or received any material marked classified" while at the State Department "and that hasn't changed in all of these months."

The presidential primary has now reached the final two-week stretch before Iowans meet to caucus on Feb. 1, but Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is spending some of those precious final days making a swing through New Hampshire.

Unlike Iowa, where Cruz is neck and neck with Donald Trump, New Hampshire is a state where Trump dominates, leading the rest of the pack by nearly 20 points in recent polls.

But Cruz said he believes the campaign is entering a "different phase," where voters will take a closer look at candidates' records — particularly Trump's.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

 

Ted Cruz is accusing his Republican rival Donald Trump of exhibiting inconsistent conservativism, suggesting he is not prepared to be president.

Cruz accused the billionaire investor of becoming "rattled" and "dismayed" by the Texas senator's gains.

The war of words between Cruz and Trump intensified in recent days, with Trump continuing to question Cruz's eligibility to be on the ballot given his Canadian birth and for not disclosing loans hereceived from Citibank and Goldman Sachs for his 2012 senate race.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was characteristically adamant at a recent town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire.

"All I do is tell the truth. I tell the truth."

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joined Morning Edition to talk about Sunday night's Democratic debate and Republican Ted Cruz's big push here in New Hampshire.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul has pledged to do everything he can from keeping current front-runner Donald Trump from becoming the GOP nominee.

"I think he’s a bad messenger. I think he sends a bad message," the Kentucky Senator said during a campaign stop in Londonderry Saturday. "I think his message is not on limiting power; it’s on give me power. I think that’s a real problem and I’m going to do everything I can to make sure he’s not the nominee."

But Paul also says he'll back Trump if he's the eventual nominee.

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