Primary 2016

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire’s heroin and opioid epidemic has become a front-and-center issue on the campaign trail – prompting presidential candidates from both parties to answer question after question about what they’d do to fight addiction on a national level.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In Nashua Monday, Bill Clinton drew more than 700 people to his first campaign appearance for his wife this primary season. And while the former president remains popular among New Hampshire Democrats, many in the crowd at Nashua Community College said his wife's candidacy rests on her own record.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In the lobby of the Radisson hotel in downtown Manchester, high school and college students find themselves thrust into a microcosm of the New Hampshire primary. Several presidential campaigns from both parties are here, along with a slew of political professionals, advocacy groups, and other card-carrying political junkies. Stickers, buttons, and email lists are everywhere. There are even cardboard cut-outs of several presidential candidates spread throughout the room.

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders generally passes up opportunities to take a dig at Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton. And he preaches the virtues of an issue-driven campaign. But Donald Trump clearly gets under his skin.

Sanders says time after time, the Republican front-runner "just comes up with things off the top of his head — that are lies."

And now the Vermont senator says Trump should stop talking about Bill Clinton's sexual history and start worrying about climate change, the minimum wage and tax breaks for rich people like Trump himself.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire’s primary is just five weeks away, and state election officials are anticipating record turnout. There’s something else on their minds too—this will be the first presidential primary with the state’s new voter ID law in place. 

The law, which passed three and a half years ago, was part of a wave of stricter voter laws pushed by Republicans across the country. How it plays out on Primary Day is still an open question.

 


Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is dismissing a terrorist propaganda video that uses part of one his stump speeches.

"They use other people," he told CBS' Face the Nation in an interview aired today. "What am I going to do? I have to say what I have to say. And you know what I have to say, there's a problem."

Billy Hathorn via Creative Commons

  Two objects that have made a big difference in New Hampshire’s presidential primary: newsprint and ink – especially in the hands of the man who published the New Hampshire Union Leader for decades, William Loeb.

Credit Allegra Boverman / NHPR

At a recent campaign event with nearly 1,000 people in Portsmouth, Hillary Clinton called on four children to ask questions – one third of the questions she took that hour. Why?

Perhaps Clinton is after softball questions, as Time proposes.  Perhaps the campaign sees interactions with children as a way to convey the candidate as warm and relatable. Or maybe Hillary Clinton just has a soft-spot for kiddos. 

Many Republicans may have sided with Donald Trump's controversial proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., but his rival Jeb Bush predicts that the GOP faithful will eventually oppose the plan and see it his way.

"Trump clearly banning all Muslims would actually be so counterproductive in our efforts to destroy ISIS that it's foolhardy," the former Florida governor told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview Wednesday in Boston. "I mean, it's beyond ridiculous; it's quite dangerous."

It all started with a question about food labeling at the Iowa Agriculture Summit earlier this year and Jeb Bush's not-so-humble brag:

"When I go to Publix in Coral Gables after church to go prepare for Sunday Funday in my house ... I'll probably make a really good guacamole and I want to know where that avocado is from and I want to know where the onions are from and the cilantro and all the secret stuff I put in it."

Jason Moon for NHPR

Republican Presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich made another round of campaign stops in New Hampshire this week. He’s among the presidential candidates who have spent the most time in New Hampshire this primary season and it shows.

 

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Joseph McQuaid, publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader, might’ve kicked the proverbial hornet’s nest when he penned a front-page editorial calling Republican frontrunner Donald Trump “a crude blowhard with no clear political philosophy.”

But the newspaperman was simply continuing his outlet’s long-running tradition of cutting presidential candidates down to size. 

While Hillary Clinton enjoys wide support in the Democratic presidential race across much of the country, in New Hampshire, Sen. Bernie Sanders still poses a threat. In Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton spoke to a crowd that included voters weighing both candidates.

You’d be hard-pressed to find a political animal as mystifying, misunderstood and over-analyzed as the so-called “independent” voter of New Hampshire.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

When Donald Trump took the stage in Nashua Monday night, he was greeted by hundreds of people sporting red “Make America Great Again” hats, waving Trump signs and this song, "We're Not Gonna Take It," by Twisted Sister.

During his hour and a half stump speech, the GOP presidential candidate addressed his standard points: building a wall along the southern border, defeating ISIS and bashing the media -- this time the local media.

Sen. Bernie Sanders' quest to win the Democratic presidential nomination has come a long way since the Vermont senator formally entered the race in late May.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump returns to the Granite State on Monday.

The billionaire businessman is scheduled to hold a rally in Nashua at 7 p.m.

Polls show Trump continues to lead the GOP field, both nationally and in  New Hampshire. 

A CBS News poll of Republican New Hampshire voters earlier this month showed 32 percent supporting Trump.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

During a town hall meeting Tuesday night in Bethlehem Republican Presidential candidate Marco Rubio covered plenty of policy turf -- including the New England Patriots.

"Tom Brady should retire, because the Miami Dolphins deserve a chance to win the AFC,” Rubio declared.

Laughter mixed with the tiniest rumble of boos...

“When I’m president, Tom Brady is going to be secretary of the Air Force," Rubio continued. "He knows a lot about throwing stuff and flying…and the Miami Dolphins will have a chance to win the division."

Chris Jensen for NHPR

At a town hall meeting in Bethlehem, N.H. on Tuesday, Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio said the United States must be willing to use military force to stand up for allies such as the Philippines against China’s encroachment on fishing rights and attempts to expand its territorial waters. He compared China’s actions to the use of force by Russia in neighboring Ukraine last year.

“It is not unlike what Vladimir Putin has done in Crimea. He invaded a neighboring country, he took over an area of that country and today everyone has just accepted it.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

All political campaigns boil down to one question: How do you get more people to vote for your candidate than for any other?

The outcome of this year's New Hampshire Republican presidential primary could hinge on how well campaigns manage this so-called ground game.


Chris Jensen for NHPR

The presidential primary trail is taking a rare detour through New Hampshire’s North Country this week.

On his latest swing through New Hampshire, Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O'Malley stopped by NHPR's offices in Concord for a conversation with The Exchange

We caught up with O'Malley — a former mayor of Baltimore and governor of Maryland — on his way up to the studios to ask for his (literal) elevator pitch pitch on why he should be president.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

With the New Hampshire primary less than two months away, GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson is trying to shore up his Granite State support.

During this week’s two-day visit, Carson hosted several town halls, headlined a forum on national security and wrapped the trip up with a holiday-themed celebration in Concord.

Allegra Boverman | Kate Harper

The fight late last week among Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee seems to have simmered down.

The DNC censured Sanders' campaign for improperly getting access to confidential voter data from Clinton's team. The restrictions have since been lifted, but the incident shone a light on a little known, but critical aspect of the 2016 presidential race: how candidates use data to identify, reach and influence potential supporters.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham ended his presidential campaign this morning. A well-known voice in Republican foreign policy debates, and a frequent visitor to New Hampshire, Graham failed to catch on with voters here. NHPR’s Senior Editor for Politics Dan Barrick spoke with All Things Considered Host Peter Biello, to look back on Graham’s short-lived White House bid.

At a Manchester, N.H., watch party following Saturday's Democratic primary debate, Hillary Clinton stood side by side with the man she called her "not so secret weapon" — her husband, former President Bill Clinton. Voters are about to see much more of him, she said.

Rebecca Lavoie for NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate and former Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley sits down with Exchange host Laura Knoy and Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. 

One of the statement's that got the most attention, and criticism, during Saturday's Democratic presidential debate was Hillary Clinton's assertion that "we now finally are where we need to be" in Syria.

Jeb Bush pounced, along with many others on the right, to call Clinton out on the assertion, given that ISIS still holds a lot of territory in Syria, and given the recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino.

But what's interesting furthermore are the two assertions Clinton made to back up her statement.

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