Brian Wilkins via Flickr CC /

Last month China ended its controversial one-child policy – but is the change as radical as it’s been made out to be by officials and news outlets? Today, a reporter on China's new "two-child policy"... and why the country really needs to focus on sex-ed. Plus, Millennials are sometimes derided as a generation slacktivists, and don't have the spending power of their elders – but non-profits are betting on them for the future. From socially conscious spending, to gimmicky donation challenges, we explore how Millennials are changing the face of charitable giving.

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons


A transgender woman has dropped a federal lawsuit against the Rockingham County claiming she suffered injuries after being classified as a man while an inmate.

Aja Kennedy, formerly known as Edward Brunetta, withdrew the suit from federal court in New Hampshire. She had claimed she was harassed and sexually assaulted while incarcerated at the Rockingham County jail in Brentwood.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Rockingham County attorneys said Wednesday the case was dropped without a settlement and that they had a "very good defense."


A former inmate at the Rockingham County prison is suing the county for allegedly not providing safe conditions inside their jail cells.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Alan Brien Sr. filed the suit Aug. 11, which states a fall from his cell's bunk last year caused "serious permanent injuries."

The suit states that Brien's bed was the top bunk, which had no ladder "or other safe mechanism to enable him to climb up from or down from the bunk."

Thomas Hawk via flickr Creative Commons /

There’s plenty of evidence that drug use during pregnancy can harm the fetus, but should using illicit substances while pregnant be a criminal offense? On today’s show, an unfiltered look at what happens when expectant mothers are jailed for drug use.

Then, from Mexican cartels to Isis, the rise in kidnappings globally adds up to a 1.6 billion dollar “hostage industry”. Later in the show a journalist attends “Hostage Camp”, where wealthy travelers learn how to survive a kidnapping.  

Sue via flickr Creative Commons /

We’ve all heard the saying “seeing is believing”, but does it ring true in a photoshopped-world? On today’s show we’ll try to find the answer to this question: why are we so easily duped by viral images:

Then, take the Talented Mr. Ripley, add several more aliases, and a dash of gruesome, and you get Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter. Writer Walter Kirn talks about being swindled by a man masquerading as a scion of the Rockefeller family, who was really a cunning imposter and a murderer.

Plus, a look back at one of the greatest hoaxes in American history, the Giant Indian of Cardiff.

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons


In hopes of halting drug smuggling, the New Hampshire Department of Corrections is putting new restrictions on what kind of mail can be sent to inmates.

David Goehring via flickr Creative Commons /

After Walter Scott was fatally shot by a South Carolina police officer last month, his family speculated he fled the police because he feared going back to jail for unpaid child support. On today’s show: a closer look at child support policies and why some argue it keeps poor men trapped in a cycle of debt, unemployment and prison. 

Then, the modern answer to hieroglyphics, emoji can convey tone and emotion in a single image. Later we’ll delve into emoji use around the world, and what it reveals about cultural and national identities. 

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons


State prison officials are prohibiting inmates from receiving greeting cards, decorative postcards or stationery with drawings and stickers under a new policy meant to clamp down on the influx of drugs.

The Concord Monitor reports the policy goes into effect May 1.

Plain stationery and postcards with content written in pencil or ink will be allowed. Tourist postcards or those with designs or pictures of any kind will not. Envelopes are removed before written content is given to inmates.

Jack Rodolico

Anyone can take a first aid class to learn how to perform CPR or splint a broken bone. But how should you respond to someone not in a physical health crisis, but a mental health crisis?

Mental health professionals in New Hampshire are promoting a course in mental health first aid. The goal is to train the general public to recognize the signs of mental illness - and encourage them to intervene.

For 20 years, Charlie fought bruising battles with mental illness. When he was at his lowest point, here’s how he describes his life.

In Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001 A Space Odyssey, fear of future technologies takes center stage in the form of Hal 9000, the sentient, yet sinister, computer in charge of spacecraft Discovery One.

On today’s show, an instructor at the MIT Media Lab envisions a brighter future, in which the interaction between humans and technology will be useful, and even playful.

Plus, we’ll take a closer look at prison gangs, their ability to maintain order behind bars and how they influence life on the outside.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and other New Hampshire officials will hold a groundbreaking ceremony at the construction site of the long-awaited women's prison.

Related: Read Emily Corwin's story on how women's prison will be designed based on data 

Construction is beginning two decades after the state was first ordered to provide female inmates the same services as their male counterparts.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

An art exhibit featuring murals created by children and their imprisoned parents is on display in Concord this month.

With rising numbers of Granite Staters incarcerated, and ever-present budget constraints, some argue that it’s time to reform our approach to crime and punishment. But balancing innovation with public safety remains a concern. We’ll look at that latest thinking about some of the ideas out there- from alternative sentencing to rehabilitation.


“Books Behind Bars” is program which pairs undergraduates from the University of Virginia with inmates at the Beaumont Juvenile Correctional Center to read classic Russian literature. Prison staff notice a marked change in behavior among inmates who take the class, and researchers have documented similar improvements in decision-making, social skill, and civic engagement among prisoners and undergrads who participate in the class.

Cheryl Senter / NHPR

Four female inmates are suing the Department of Corrections for what they say is a disparity of opportunity compared to the male prisoners in the state.

Four women in Goffstown and Concord prisons have filed a suit alleging that the Department of Corrections is out of compliance with the 1987 federal court order that required the state to provide female prisoners with services male inmates already receive.

These services include vocational education, mental health treatment and housing programs.

Recent dispatches from the trial of Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik have stirred politicians and online groups to urge Norway’s justice system to re-examine its maximum sentence of twenty-one years, given the severity of the charges.

(Photo by Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons)

Part 1:

Pay Less...Hate More?

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

We talk with NHPR's Dan Gorenstein about a new summer camp program being launched for kids of state prison inmates.

Dan's original story.