Race

Credit Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

New Hampshire schools and communities have been doing some serious soul searching after reports of racist incidents in which children were harassed verbally and physically, resulting in neck injuries for one boy after an alleged attempted lynching.

Right now, many are in response mode.

What are the best strategies in school settings for addressing racial tension or preventing it from happening in the first place? 

The Oyster River School District will be requiring diversity training for all staff in the wake of an alleged racist bullying incident earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says the trainings will be led by a member of the state health department who specializes in racial minority affairs. Morse says the training will be required for every district employee, including himself.

Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts staged two shows last weekend of “Antigone in Ferguson.” The play draws connections between the ancient Greek tragedy and the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown.

Conversation after the show touched on recent events just south of Hanover, in Claremont. The family of a young boy there alleges a group of local teenagers attempted to hang the child by a rope in a racially motivated attack. They say he nearly died.

Courtesy

The family of an eight year-old Claremont, N.H. boy is calling into question the police department’s initial handling of an incident they say was a racially motivated lynching attack.

The state attorney general's office is now assisting Claremont investigators with their work.

https://www.gofundme.com/helpquincyheal

As of Thursday morning, nearly $25,000 had been raised for the young boy injured recently in an alleged race-based attack in Claremont. 

Hundreds have contributed to an online fundraising campaign for the eight-year-old biracial boy and his family. That's in just the couple of days that the Go-Fund-Me site has been active.

Oyster River School District

The Oyster River School District is grappling with a racially charged incident that took place on a school bus earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says he was taken aback by the revelation that an elementary school student from a biracial family had been bullied with racist language by another student on the bus.

He says the episode was out of character for the district which includes the towns of Durham, Madbury, and Lee.

Claremont City Manager Ryan McNutt and Police Chief Mark Chase will attend a community event Tuesday night aimed at responding to the alleged race-based attack of a young biracial boy in town, McNutt said.

A social and racial justice group is calling on the Claremont Police Department to be more forthcoming with information about injuries suffered by an 8-year-old biracial boy last month.

Geoff Forester | Concord Monitor

At Epsom Central School, a mural map of the United States features a small confederate flag planted on the southeastern states.

Tuesday night, the Epsom School Board voted 3-2 to defeat a motion to remove or alter the mural to remove that flag. It's a debate that had echoes of the unrest surrounding Confederate monuments in other parts of the country.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Civil rights groups are filing a formal right-to-know request with the Manchester school district.

Speaking from the steps of city hall, Manchester NAACP president Eric Jackson said the school district hasn’t been transparent enough about its efforts to address racial inequities.

Adam Moss via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/nC7L4L

The white supremacist movement went public last week in Charlottesville--an ugly wake-up to a growing racist movement. On today’s show, we'll get a racial reality check from a teacher at one of the state's most exclusive private schools.    

Plus, calls to confront America’s racial legacy extend from coast-to-coast and above the Mason-Dixon line. We'll hear about the challenges of being a student of color at the University of New Hampshire--both past and present.

Facebook - All Eyes on UNH

As students get ready to return for another year at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, for some, there’s still unfinished business from last year.

After a series of racist campus incidents, students of color called upon the administration to make UNH a safer, more inclusive space, and presented a list of demands.

Jason Moon for NHPR

At the center of the weekend's turmoil in Charlottesville is a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. 

While New Hampshire isn't seeing much debate over old confederate monuments, at a post office in Durham, a 1950's-era mural is raising questions about race and another uncomfortable chapter from our nation's history.

5.23.17: Spring Picks

May 23, 2017
Photo: Khánh Hmoong via flickr Creative Common / https://flic.kr/p/biERcB

It's spring picks week on Word of Mouth. The crew has scoured the airwaves and handpicked stories and interviews that will entertain, delight, and maybe even challenge you. Up first, a reporter takes an unflinching look at an uncomfortable topic: what is whiteness?  

Then, a candid and compelling conversation with an ex-con who wants to have his swastika tattoo covered up.

Finally we head to The Magic Castle—a private club for magicians in Los Angeles—to find out what distinguishes a delightful trick from a dirty con.

5.22.17: Spring Picks

May 22, 2017
Photo: Khánh Hmoong via flickr Creative Common / https://flic.kr/p/bT2fmP

It’s spring picks week here on Word of Mouth. The crew—plus a special guest—have tilled the audio soil, and handpicked a beautiful bouquet of stories that will entertain, delight, and sometimes challenge you.

We kick off with a story that poses a complicated question: why is northern New England so overwhelmingly white? Then, astronomer Phil Plait ponders this conundrum: why are humans so quick to give aliens the credit for the mysteries of the cosmos?

Then we’ll find the unexpected joy in hearing someone read a local newspaper's police blotter. Links to all of today's picks can be found below.

Missy Caulk via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7jbGE3

On today's show:

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Michael Treadwell sat at the back of a courtroom.  In a windbreaker and khaki pants, he leaned over his work boots, elbows on his knees. At first, I thought he was chewing gum – a bold choice in a courtroom.  When we began to talk, I discovered it wasn't gum Michael was chewing.  It was his own gums. Michael doesn't have any teeth.

In Conversation With Colson Whitehead & Ben Winters

Nov 4, 2016
Courtesy Sara Plourde, NHPR

Colson Whitehead and Ben Winters joined Virginia in front of a live audience for the "In the Spotlight" series at the Capital Center for the Arts in Concord, New Hampshire, presented in partnership with Gibson's Bookstore. Today, we're listening to that conversation with two writers who made the imaginative leap from what we already know happened, to what could have happened.

As a rookie officer in Nashua, N.H., Sergeant Lakeisha Phelps owned a little blue sports car. “One of the troopers would stop me like every other night,” she says, laughing. Phelps worked midnight shifts, and arrived in Nashua around 11 at night.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Radisson ballroom was not yet full, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump would not arrive for almost an hour. Already, the crowd chanted, “lock her up.” Peter Vincello from Raymond was on his way in, with his 15 year-old son.

“He kinda talked me into it. I was actually supporting Cruz in the primary.” But now, Vincello said, “He says all the right things, second amendment, getting the economy back, law and order.”

Emily Corwin

New analysis of state and county-wide data shows black and Hispanic people are arrested and incarcerated at higher rates in New Hampshire than whites are, and at more disproportionate rates than blacks and Hispanics nationwide.

Twitter.com/ChiefWillard

Manchester Police Chief Nick Willard's uninhibited style has landed him in the spotlight recently. He’s been outspoken about the state's opioid crisis and has weighed in on political campaign disputes.

Most recently, he’s taken heat for comments about policing and race. But those who work with Willard say his actions often speak better than his words. 

beisbolsinaloa / Flickr/CC

A new book by UNH historian Jason Sokol describes what he calls the region’s 'conflicted soul’ when it comes to race. Sokol explores the discrepancies between the North’s image as haven from the segregated south, and the harsh realities that African Americans faced in black neighborhoods from Boston to Brooklyn.

This program originally broadcast on February 12, 2015.

GUEST:

11.01.15: Incognito, Jedis, & Daylight Savings

Oct 30, 2015
Leo Reynolds via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6pobVe

Michael Fosberg grew up in a middle-class white family – and didn’t discover until his early 30s that his biological father was black. Today, a conversation about race, identity and personal discovery with actor Michael Fosberg. Plus, whether you’re looking forward to brighter mornings or dreading the dark afternoons, daylight saving time is happening on Sunday. We’ll debunk the myths of daylight saving time., starting with its origins.

Farrukh via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/armk7P

Michael Fosberg grew up in a middle-class white family – and didn’t discover until his early 30s that his biological father was black. Today, a conversation about race, identity and personal discovery with actor Michael Fosberg.   Also today, autumn habits gone wrong. We’ll talk to a writer argues that apple- picking is a big fat scam. And, after more than twenty years of carved pumpkins and big crowds, Keene, New Hampshire will be quiet this weekend. We’ll ask residents how they feel about the loss of a long holiday ritual. 

Aaron Webb via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/zfVaH

Police shootings and deaths of African-Americans in police custody have prompted calls for a national conversation about race. So, what do well-meaning white people have to add? We speak with the author of a new memoir urges white people to examine their privileged place in a stacked deck. Plus, the five words many parents dread: “where do babies come from?” A new book answers that question at a time where surrogacy, same sex couples, and fertility labs are challenging old norms and the standby response, “when a daddy really loves a mommy…” Today, we’re tackling the tough conversations. 

Chris Goldberg via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/cjtwcN

Police shootings of unarmed black men and the deaths of African-Americans in police custody have prompted calls for a national conversation about racial inequality. So, what do well-meaning, privileged white people have to add? Today, the author of a new memoir urges white people to examine their privileged place in a stacked deck. Then, author and New Hampshire magazine editor Rick Broussard turns film director for Granite Orpheus, an experimental film project that sets the ancient myth of Orpheus against the torn-up streets of Concord.   

Night Owl City via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/c3bZSd

As one of only six black pre-med students at Duke, Damon Tweedy was mistaken for a janitor…just one of many humiliations from the predominantly white field. Today, we’ll talk to Dr. Tweedy about the dearth of black doctors and what that means for people of color. Then, the trail of writers that have migrated from New York to New England to launch their careers have left a well-worn path. We’ll talk to two authors about the appeal of leaving the big apple for the natural beauty and quirky ways of New England.

Justin Valas / Flickr CC

With controversy over police tactics in African-American communities and the slaying of black churchgoers in South Carolina, we check in with the new president of the Manchester branch of the country’s oldest civil rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

  Leaders from a wide range of faiths stood before a group of roughly seventy people to mourn the murder of nine worshippers in Charleston and to call for peace, unity and change. 

Reverend Jared Rardin of South Congregational said now is the time for people to come together to discuss racism and tolerance.

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