Racism

The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

How We Talk About Race In N.H.

Wolfeboro, where a police commissioner was recently pressured to resign after making racist comments
Credit Sean Hurley / NHPR

After racist remarks by Los Angeles Clippers Owner Donald Sterling and Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, outrage dominated the national headlines, and both men were widely reprimanded.  But some say merely criticizing and dismissing such comments isn’t enough – and that we need a candid conversation about race relations.

GUESTS:

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NH News
4:02 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Tourism Boycott Threats Follow Racist Comments By Wolfeboro Commissioner

The iconic sign welcoming visitors to Wolfeboro, NH.
Credit Goldeneye via Flickr CC

New Hampshire officials are getting hit with calls, emails and tweets reacting to racist comments made by a town police commissioner.

Jim Bouley, mayor of the capital city of Concord, said the reaction from as far away as California included threats to cancel vacations in New Hampshire. The calls started Thursday after news reports detailed comments by Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, who admitted using the N-word to describe President Barack Obama.

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Word of Mouth
12:56 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Revisiting The Central Park Five

Credit IFC Films

Central Park was New York City’s place of refuge and openness until April 19, 1989 when a woman was brutally assaulted and left for dead. Author Sarah Burns turned her research about the event into a documentary film detailing the racially charged convictions of five black and Latino youth. They were exonerated over a decade later when another man confessed to committing the crime.

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Law
12:25 pm
Mon March 26, 2012

DOJ Follows Its 'Conscience' In Civil Rights Battles

Attorney General Eric Holder arrives at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Feb. 2. Holder says, "The Civil Rights Division ... is the conscience of the Justice Department."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

When community leaders wanted justice for the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, they went knocking on the door of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. And that's been happening a lot lately.

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U.S.
4:00 am
Wed March 21, 2012

Social Media Put Fla. Case In National Spotlight

Civil rights leaders and residents of Sanford, Fla., attend a meeting Tuesday to discuss the death of Trayvon Martin, who was shot by a neighborhood watch captain. The Justice Department and the FBI opened an investigation into the shooting, and the local state attorney announced that he had asked a grand jury to investigate.
Gerardo Mora Getty Images

The shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Florida has sparked heated reactions across the country, but there was a lag before mainstream media picked up on the story. Not so online, where a more immediate outcry grew into a petition drive this week to encourage a federal investigation.

Now the Justice Department is looking into Trayvon Martin's death at the hands of a neighborhood watch volunteer, and black media and social media were key in demanding closer scrutiny.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
10:18 am
Thu March 15, 2012

A pond by any other name...

In his 2010 Comedy Central stand-up special, comedian Louis C.K. pondered a sometimes-epithet and the fine line between desciptor, and slur. Joking aside, C.K.’s take hits very close to home for the townspeople of Mont Vernon, New Hampshire, who, for the past several months, have been engaged in a fierce debate about whether or not a small local pond’s name on federal maps,  “Jew Pond” is offensive, and whether the pond should get a new mo

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