Remembrances

11.11.14: Veteran's Day

Nov 11, 2014
jpellgen via flickr Creative Commons

Ron Capps served in five wars in ten years, and was left with severe PTSD. On today’s show, he talks with us about founding the Veterans Writing Project to harness the power of prose for coping with the hidden wounds of war. Plus, we’ll find out how one mother of three dealt with her husband’s prolonged absence during military deployments: by asking guests to fill his empty seat once a week.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Public Service of New Hampshire says that its former CEO, Gary Long, died Friday afternoon after a sudden illness.

Long started at PSNH in 1976, and began his tenure as CEO in 2000. He led the state’s largest utility at a time when the state restructured the electric utility industry. He stepped down as CEO last year to take a role leading the Northern Pass project through the regulatory process. He was also serving as chair of the board of directors for the Granite United Way.

Susanna Bolle / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week New Hampshire’s contra dance community said goodbye to one of its most celebrated musicians and writers.

Bob McQuillen died Tuesday following a stroke. He was 90 years old.

McQuillen - sometimes called “Mac” or “Mr. Mack” – Among those contribitions: writing thousands of tunes. And as he noted on NHPR in 2002, many of them were written for – and named for - individuals:

One of Manchester, New Hampshire’s most celebrated business owners has died. May Gruber owned Pandora sweaters for decades; it was one of the area’s biggest operations.

Several years ago May Gruber was the subject of a documentary, called “Sweater Queen.” All Things Considered host Brady Carlson talked with the film’s producer, Nancy Beach, in 2012. She started by telling the story of how Gruber and her family first came to New Hampshire.

Courtesy Gloria Zogopoulos

Singer Patti Page died on New Year’s Day in California. She was 85.

Author Ray Bradbury has died, his daughter tells The Associated Press. The wire service says Bradbury passed away Tuesday night.

Dick Clark, affectionately known as the "world's oldest teenager," has died. He was 82, and had suffered a heart attack while in a Santa Monica hospital for an outpatient procedure.

Richard Wagstaff Clark became a national icon with American Bandstand in the 1950s, hosting the show for more than 30 years. Clark also hosted the annual New Year's Eve special for ABC for decades. He weathered scandals, hosted game shows and renewed his Bandstand fame with a new generation by producing the nostalgic TV drama American Dreams.

Saxophonist Andrew Love of the Memphis Horns has died. Love, who had Alzheimer's disease, died on April 12 at his home in Memphis. He was 70 years old.

Robert Sherman — one half of the songwriting team behind Disney movies and major hit musicals — has died. He was 86. The Oscar-winning Sherman Brothers, Robert and Richard, wrote some of the most enduring Disney songs of all time. Their output was astounding: Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, The Aristocats.

John Lasseter, of Pixar and Disney, once said, "You cannot forget a Sherman brothers song for your life."

Kitty Eisele is supervising senior editor at NPR's Morning Edition. In this essay she remembers Monkees band member Davy Jones, who died Wednesday at age 66.

This is embarrassing to write, but years ago when my first crush erupted, I asked my dad to write a love note on my behalf to Davy Jones.