Jim Cole / AP Photo POOL

 A recent headline in my local paper, the Portsmouth Herald, reads "McDonough Questioned About Sex, Lies, and Duct Tape."  The story is a tragedy – a young woman died. The details are upsetting.  Yet -  I just read the article top to bottom.  Why? I want to know.  

Walking on Market Street in downtown Portsmouth, I come upon Marlene Allen. “Well, because it’s so lurid!” She says. “that’s like a novel, that’s like Hannibal Lector!”

Fifty Shades of NHPR

Jun 18, 2012
(Photo by Rebecca Lavoie)

While we were prepping for today's segment on audio books, we couldn’t help but wonder about whether we could pass as audio book producers…perhaps even elevating a book of dubious quality by getting just the right people to read it. So, we took dramatic  stab at an excerpt from the hottest book around, Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L.

The news business has changed a lot in recent years, and that's especially true of political news. But when you ask about a book that captures what it's like to report on a presidential campaign, one decades-old classic still rules: The Boys on the Bus by Timothy Crouse.

The rough-and-tumble account of the reporters who covered President Richard Nixon's re-election against George McGovern back in 1972 is part of a Morning Edition series on political history.

Photo by igorschwarzmann, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Traditional news organizations pride themselves for upholding clear divisions between their business and editorial operations. The partition is often reflected in the floor plans and culture of print and broadcast facilities, and preserved with a piety rarely seen in the skeptical journalist crowd. That attitude may be precisely why the news industry is in trouble, writes Dorian Benkoil.