Retirement / Flickr / Creative Commons

For years Americans have been warned that longer life spans, increasing healthcare costs, and decreasing support from employer pensions will have serious consequences for the future of retirement. We’ll speak with the author of a new book that offers solutions in both public policy and personal finance.

Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

The state Supreme Court has ruled against a retired police officer who argued he had the right to work part-time for several towns while collecting a pension.

After retiring as a Plaistow police officer in November of 2011, Scott Anderson continued to work in a part-time capacity for Plaistow, Atkinson and Hampstead.

cogdogblog via Flickr CC

  Last week, the Federal Reserve released a startling statistic: one in five people nearing retirement age have no money saved for it. On today’s show we pose the question: have we reached the end of retirement? Plus, forget the fashion of New York City, London’s music scene, and the bright lights of Tokyo. Why South Korea may become the coolest place on the planet. 

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Alan Levine via flickr Creative Commons

Last week, the Federal Reserve released a startling statistic: one in five people nearing retirement age have no money saved for it. On today’s show we pose the question: have we reached the end of retirement? Also, with almost 8 million Americans over 65 still working – a rising number of older Americans are hitting the road to chase low-wage jobs across the country.  We’ll also talk to a reporter who looked for the retail connection to a holiday that is growing in popularity here in the US: Ramadan.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

A new report finds New Hampshire is the 13th best state for retirement.

Heart Industry / Flickr Creative Commons

We continue our series with a look at older workers. Some found themselves suddenly out of a job due to recession. Now, half a decade later, we’re seeing how they’ve adjusted - and the many paths they’ve taken, by choice or necessity.


  • Kelly Clark – state director of AARP-New Hampshire
  • Dennis Delay – economist for the NH Center for Public Policy Studies; also New Hampshire forecast manager for the New England Economic Partnership


M.C. Chavez via flickr Creative Commons

Do you cut coupons or drive around looking for the gas station with the lowest price? If so, you might think of yourself as a skinflint…but you’ve probably got nothing on Jeff Yeager, who proudly claims the title “The Ultimate Cheapskate.” Jeff doesn’t just stretch a dollar; he gets his cash to do calisthenics.  He is the author of several books rife with miserly tips, including the The Cheapskate Next Door, Don’t Throw That Away and How To Retire The Cheapskate Way. Jeff is also featured in the AARP web video series, “The Cheap Life.”

Tax Credits via Flickr Creative Commons

What's hiding in your IRA? If you’re part a mutual fund that includes weapons manufacturer Smith and Wesson, you’ve seen a handsome return on your investment over the last several months. But what if you’re a proponent of stricter gun control, or a straight out pacifist? Whether by blissful ignorance or stubborn prioritizing, an uneasy dissonance between morals and money is growing in America’s investment portfolios.

Aging In Place

May 8, 2013
Sheryl Rich-Kern, NHPR

According to a recent AARP survey, more than 95 percent of New Hampshire seniors want to remain in their own homes as they age - but that’s not always practical or affordable.

To address these concerns, two non-profits in the state are developing a novel approach to home-based eldercare that’s becoming popular around the country.

A retirement crisis is looming. As people live longer, one study finds that half of all households are at risk of coming up short on retirement money. And while many working households may feel they simply don't have enough to spare for retirement, experts say some of the biggest barriers to saving up are psychological.

When Pat Matthews turned 65, her declining health led her in search of a place that could offer increasing levels of care as she grew older.

And Matthews had one other requirement: She wanted to bring Carol Bosworth, her partner of nearly 20 years. At the very first place they visited, that was a problem.

"They didn't say we couldn't come. But they said that we would be best off if we were sisters," Matthews says. "We crossed them off our list, because that's not the way we want to live."

At 75, many people imagine they'll be retired and spending their time playing cards or on a golf course. But according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of working seniors is actually on the rise. In fact, it's more than doubled since 1990.

Ella Washington decided to go back to work at 83. Today, she's a receptionist in training at a senior living home outside Washington, D.C. She's hoping it will be a stepping stone to a real job, which she's been looking for since 2005.