rivers

Word of Mouth
2:42 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Let's Show Some Love For The Lakes (And Rivers)

Credit l . e . o via Flickr Creative Commons

We spoke with National Geographic Traveler Magazine editor-in-chief Keith Bellows about what makes a great beach town, and he gave us some idea locations all across the country. This inspired us to make a list of New Hampshire summer spots, with particular attention to one of the state’s specialties – lakes.  We’ve also squeezed a couple rivers in here as well.

Read more
Word of Mouth
10:49 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Breaching The Veazie Dam To Restore A Habitat

More than 300 excited spectators gathered to watch the breaching of Veazie Dam.
Credit Meagan Racey, USFWS via flickr

On July 22nd, bulldozers breached the Veazie dam in Eddington, Maine – an 830 foot strip of concrete that had separated the Atlantic Ocean and the Penobscot River for a century.  It was an effort undertaken by an unlikely coalition of conservationists, fishermen, power companies and others, who came together to help restore 1000 miles of endangered Atlantic salmon habitat. Brian Graber is director of the river restoration program at American rivers, one of the partners behind the project.

Read more
EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun June 16, 2013

The Colorado River: America's Most Endangered

Credit iStockPhoto

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Why was the Colorado River named the most endangered river of 2013?

                                                                                                   -- Missy Perkins, Jenkintown, PA

Read more
EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun January 6, 2013

Climate Change And Rivers

Credit iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Read more
Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri October 5, 2012

Thoreau Remembered

Henry David Thoreau's death 150 years ago has inspired memorial events in Concord - the Massachusetts Concord - but Thoreau passed through our Concord on a trip by boat and foot that led to his first book.

Read more
All Things Considered
5:21 pm
Fri June 29, 2012

How A River That Used to "Run Red" With Pollution Got Clean

The Nashua River today, as shown in the film "Marion Stoddart: The Work of 1000."
Courtesy The Work of 1000 Civic Engagement Program

June is National Rivers Month, which means it’s a good time to talk about a recent film chronicling the effort to clean up the Nashua River. It’s called “Marion Stoddart: The Work of 1000” and has been screened at a number of environmental film festivals.

Susan Edwards is the film’s producer, and she talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about, the film, Marion Stoddard and the Nashua River.

EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

How Do Dams Hurt Rivers?

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: How is it that dams actually hurt rivers?-- Missy Davenport, Boulder, CO

Dams are a symbol of human ingenuity and engineering prowess—controlling the flow of a wild rushing river is no small feat. But in this day and age of environmental awareness, more and more people are questioning whether generating a little hydroelectric power is worth destroying riparian ecosystems from their headwaters in the mountains to their mouths at the ocean and beyond.

Read more
Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri January 6, 2012

Solid Water

s.alt via Flickr

You learned a remarkable property of H2O back in High School chemistry. Remember?

Normally, the density of compounds decreases as temperatures increase and molecules spread out. When temperatures fall, density increases as molecules become more tightly packed. Not true for ice – in fact, the exact opposite occurs!

In liquid form, each water molecule’s hydrogen is bonded to 3 other water molecules. In ice form, each molecule’s hydrogen bonded to 4 others. These hydrogen bonds form an open arrangement that is less compact than liquid water.

Read more
Fresh Greens
12:00 am
Fri September 4, 2009

The Charles River Didn't Kill Me

Read more