russia

Ron Cogswell/Flickr

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, told lawmakers in a statement on Monday that he "did not collude... with any foreign government."

Kushner is meeting behind closed doors with the Senate Intelligence Committee on Monday and the House Intelligence Committee on Tuesday. Both panels are investigating Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election and whether any members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia.

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer on Tuesday.

An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father." 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee today as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Sessions is expected to take questions about his recusal from the Russia investigation, his own meetings with Russian officials, and what if anything he knew about a private Oval Office meeting between President Trump and fired FBI Director James Comey. Here is Sessions' prepared opening statement to the committee, annotated by NPR journalists.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 9, 2017

Jun 9, 2017

It was another busy week: former FBI Director James Comey gave testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday, Governor Sununu aligned with President Trump on his decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement, and there's more wrangling over the state budget. 


Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence this week, speaking publicly for the first time since he was fired by President Trump nearly a month ago. The Senate Committee is looking into the circumstances around Comey's dismissal and how they relate to the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the U.S. Election.

Updated at 6:28 p.m. ET

Former FBI Director James Comey will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday that President Trump did ask him for "loyalty" at a January dinner and later told him alone in the Oval Office that he "hope[d] you can let" the investigation into former national security director Michael Flynn "go."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When President Donald Trump dismissed FBI Director James Comey yesterday, critics immediately drew comparisons to an incident during Richard Nixon’s presidency known as the Saturday Night Massacre. That’s when Nixon fired a special prosecutor investigating the Watergate break-in, leading to high-level resignations and a constitutional crisis.

NHPR’s Peter Biello discussed the lessons and limitations of this comparison with Tim Naftali, a professor of history at NYU and former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library.

It was a matter of urgency, former acting Attorney General Sally Yates says, when she called White House lawyers back in late January.

She needed to tell them that Gen. Michael Flynn, then-national security adviser, appeared to be lying to the White House, making him vulnerable to blackmail by Moscow.

"We believed that Gen. Flynn was compromised with respect to the Russians," Yates told a Senate subcommittee on Monday. "To state the obvious, you don't want your national security adviser compromised by the Russians."

Allegra Boverman

We sit down with Mary Louise Kelly, NPR's national security correspondent, a beat that has her covering the CIA, the FBI and other intelligence agencies.  We'll look at the year she's experienced following those stories - including this week's Capitol Hill hearings about Russian interference in the presidential election.   Kelly is in New Hampshire this week for the Justice and Journalism series -- a collaboration between NHPR and the Warren B. Rudman Center at UNH Law School. 


A Russian billionaire paid former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort millions of dollars to boost the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Associated Press reports. The new allegations arise months after Manafort resigned from the campaign amid concerns over his work for a pro-Russian political party in Ukraine.

Via NPR

The NPR Two-Way blog brings you live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

The live blog includes streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

Scroll down to see the coverage.

Loading...

Allegra Boverman

 

 

If one New Hampshire lawmaker has his way, it might become difficult to find Russian vodka in the state's liquor stores.

Democratic Senate Minority Leader Jeff Woodburn on Monday proposed a bill that would establish a bipartisan commission to consider ways the state could respond to what he calls "Russian interference in our democracy."

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she is still undecided over a confirmation vote for Rex Tillerson, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for Secretary of State.

Shaheen, a second-term Democrat, met earlier this week with the former ExxonMobil CEO, calling her conversation with Tillerson broad. Speaking in Rochester Friday, the Democrat again raised concerns about Tillerson’s business dealings with Russia.

NHPR

The incoming Trump administration will face international dilemmas that defy easy answers: threats from North Korea, European uncertainty after Brexit, and Middle East conflicts aplenty. However, although Americans are divided on many issues, a new study finds a surprising amount of consensus on foreign policy.


Doby Photography; NPR

We sit down with Corey Flintoff, longtime NPR Russia Correspondent. Flintoff has returned to the U.S., with tales of his many years reporting overseas. We talk with him about some of the big stories he covered, including Russian aggression in Ukraine, and allegations of Russian meddling in America's presidential election. 


Dennis Jarvis via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7jeDS3

Recent public health crises like Ebola and Zika show how fear grabs public and media's attention. But there's another virus potentially be more harmful on a mass scale that's crept under the radar. Today, we'll hear about a virus that's killing off Tilapia by the millions - and what that could mean for our global food supply.

Then, Vladimir Lenin died in 1924 - but you wouldn't know that by looking at his exquisitely preserved corpse. So what's the secret?

Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin

Feb 23, 2016
majjed2008 / Flickr/CC

While many observers see Vladimir Putin as a 'man from nowhere' without a face, substance, or soul, our guest today argues that he has had a number of personas over time. His public relations team has pitched him as everything from 'outsider' to 'history man' to suit the historical moment. Understanding these personalties, she argues, is key to making policy decisions about Russia.

Guest:

Primary 2016: Foreign Policy on the Campaign Trail

Oct 29, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at what the candidates are saying about America’s role in the world: how to deal with terrorism and handle the numerous conflicts in the Middle East, what to do about fraught relations with Russia, China and North Korea, and how best to respond to the refugee crisis in Europe and conduct trade in the global area.

GUESTS:

Jedimentat44 via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/auAnDK

A simple Google image search reveals countless images of a shirtless Vladimir Putin, riding horseback, fishing, and brandishing weapons. On today’s show: how the Russian leader uses machismo and gender stereotypes to build political legitimacy.

Then, among the most popular New Year resolutions, getting in shape ranks close to the top, but less than 10% of weight-loss resolutions last. A philosopher shares his take on how we should think about exercise, in order to maintain a regimen.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Kelly Ayotte in Portsmouth
Cheryl Senter / NHPR

New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte is calling for tougher action against Russia for annexing Crimea.   

hegtor / Flickr Creative Commons

In Ukraine, tensions are growing. More forces are massing around the Crimean peninsula of the country, threats of war keep getting louder and allies of both countries are figuring out how to react if war begins. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away in New Hampshire, residents with direct ties to the country worry and wait.  A Nashua engineer born in the eastern city of Kharkiv, an area with close ties to Russia, keeps in touch with his parents and other residents living in Ukraine.

Kelly Ayotte in Portsmouth
Cheryl Senter / NHPR

With Ukraine still torn between pro-European and pro-Russian factions, New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte is calling on the Obama Administration to take a strong stand against Russia.

Speaking on Fox News Sunday, Ayotte said the so-called “Reset Policy” with President Vladimir Putin had failed.  She pointed out the country’s siding with the Assad regime in Syria, harboring NSA leaker Edward Snowden, and alleged violation of a decades-old nuclear arms treaty.

Johnny9s via flickr Creative Commons

While Russia celebrated its history and artistry at the spectacular opening to the Sochi games, protestors of Putin’s anti-gay propaganda laws were being carted off to jail. Today on Word of Mouth, a writer travels to Russia to learn about life for gay people trapped in the iron closet. 

Also today, India’s luge champ, Mexico’s royal mariachi ski racer and a few other unlikely heroes to watch for at Sochi. Plus, the book awards chosen by critics who read everything. Listen to the full show here, and scroll down for links and more.

fernandocabo / Flickr Creative Commons

The Cold War might be over but the two former enemies are hardly on warm terms. Sore points for the U.S. include Russia’s shielding of NSA-leaker Edward Snowden, its anti-gay laws, and its support for the Syrian regime. But Putin-led Russia has its own complaints against the West, and seeks greater respect on the world stage. Now, These geopolitical dramas form the backdrop to the Sochi Olympics, considered a chance for Russia to boost its global reputation.

GUESTS:

Is Sochi Safe?

Jan 21, 2014
©Thomas Dworzak National Geographic

While landing the 2014 Winter Olympic games was a crowning political achievement for Russian President Vladimir Putin, preparations for the Sochi games have not been so triumphant. With just three weeks until opening ceremonies, security officials are actively chasing down members of a terrorist group that has publicly threatened to disrupt the games. The seaside resort town of Sochi and neighboring sites of Olympic events have a long history of anti-government friction. Only a day’s drive from Chechnya, the region borders recently disputed territory with Georgia and was the site of an alleged genocide perpetrated by Russian Tsars in the 19th century. Our guest is writer Brett Forrest, he examined the landscape and geopolitics of the upcoming 2014 games in the January issue of National Geographic magazine.

Wikicommons

Imagine this: a family of six, living for more than 40 years in an isolated tiny cabin on the vast Siberian Taiga. If this were the 19th century, it might not be so far-fetched. But, it was 1978 when four geologists prospecting for iron discovered the Lykovs. Patriarch Karp Lykov and his wife, Akulina, fled the Soviet purges of the 1930s and headed for the forest where they raised their children, completely unaware of WWII, the moon landing, the cold war, or the advent of television.

poniblog / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. ties with Russia have always been complicated, but recently they have heated up even more. Disputes over how to approach the war in Syria, Russia’s protection of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, as well as the recent tug of war over Ukraine have all contributed to this tension. We’re examining this fraught relationship and how it’s changed. 

GUESTS:

Joshua Weinstein via POV Docs

The dream of “being discovered” is on parade at a casting call in Novosibirsk, one of several Siberian cities that supply the pre-adolescent, doe-eyed, “Russian look” models most desired by the Japanese fashion market. Ashley Arbaugh scours rural beauty pageants for girls, typically poor, mostly looking for a way out, and sends them off to Tokyo. That journey, marked by deceit and exploitation, is the subject of “Girl Model”, a documentary feature by David Redmon and Ashley Sabin. Together, David and Ashley have produced, directed and edited seven documentary feature films. Their latest, “Girl Model,” makes its broadcast premiere on PBS’s acclaimed POV series on Sunday.

Leo Reynods via Flickr Creative Commons

Our niftiest and spiffiest content, all in one great show. This week, a look at the shifting human condition. Holocaust survivors being turned into holograms, a Russian "Swiss Family Robinson" that missed most of the 20th Century, corporate anthropologists, transplant "tourism," the nasty effect of internet comments, and a former professor pens a memoir about being stalked by an ex- student online.

Generation Putin

Mar 3, 2013

It's been over 20 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Young people in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Georgia are facing unemployment, democratic pressure, and the legacy of repression, while being influenced by the West, punk music, and the Pussy Riot trials. PRX sent a reporting team from the Seattle Globalist to explore the tensions in these countries, described by The Atlantic as 'uneasily suspended' between two political eras. Join host Brooke Gladstone for Generation Putin, an in-depth look at the millennial generation in the post-Soviet states.

Pages