saint-gaudens

James Napoli

There are the mysteries you know about, and then there are the ones lurking in your midst. For the staff at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, it was a bit of both.

The site, run by the National Park Service, is the estate of Gilded Age sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Saint-Gaudens is behind many iconic monuments still standing today, most famously of Civil War heroes in Chicago and Boston. 


National Park Service

The House has passed a bill by U.S. Congresswoman Annie Kuster that would redesignate the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in New Hampshire as a national park, in recognition of its artifacts and properties.

Kuster, a Democrat, said Tuesday that by renaming the site a national park,  it is her hope that more visitors will be encourage to visit the site in Cornish to learn about sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens' impact on America's artistic heritage. She said it plays an important role in the local economy and is a valued tourist attraction.

Courtesy of Opera North

Blow-Me-Down Farm occupies more than 40 acres along the Connecticut River, just across the road from Saint Gaudens National Historic Site. The National Park Service owns the property, and has been working with Lebanon-based Opera North on a plan to spruce up the estate and make it a center for the arts.  

National Park Service

Starting this month, fourth graders and their families are now able to get into the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish free of charge.

That’s thanks to the federal Every Kid in a Park Program, a White House initiative granting fourth-grade students across the country free admission to all national parks.

The program began Sept. 1.