sales tax

JJBers via Flickr/Creative Commons

A major ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court last month means that states that impose a sales tax can now require businesses located outside of their borders to collect that tax and turn the money over. It’s a big deal for New Hampshire, one of the few states without a sales tax.

NHPR Staff

The Executive Council will vote Wednesday on Governor Chris Sununu’s request for a special legislative session this summer.

The call for a session stems from the Supreme Court’s recent decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, in which the majority of justices ruled that states that impose a sales tax can require businesses in other states to collect and remit that tax on their behalf.

SCOTUS

A major U.S. Supreme Court ruling last week could force New Hampshire businesses to collect a sales tax on behalf of other states.

The ruling in the case of South Dakota v. Wafair overturned more than 50 years of legal precedent. The decision is seen as a blow to New Hampshire businesses, which say collecting a sales tax on behalf of other states is burdensome.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Taylor Caswell, a commissioner at the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, about how the state plans to respond.


A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

SCOTUS

A major U.S. Supreme Court ruling out Thursday could force New Hampshire businesses to collect a sales tax on behalf of other states.

 

The case of South Dakota v. Wayfair centers on how to treat items sold online, and whether states that impose a sales tax, such as South Dakota, can require businesses who sell goods to South Dakota residents to collect and remit those taxes.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The United States Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a case with huge potential impact on New Hampshire businesses, as well as anyone who shops online.

The case essentially pits the 45 states that impose a sales tax against the handful that don’t, including the Granite State.

On Thursday, the State of New Hampshire filed a legal brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case South Dakota v. Wayfair, which is scheduled for oral arguments later this month.

The case could have huge ramifications for how businesses collect sales taxes when selling goods to customers across state lines.

Jeff Kubina via Wikimedia Commons

The state of New Hampshire is weighing in on an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case that could reshape how sales tax is collected across state lines.

This fall, Granite Staters will vote on a constitutional amendment that would forever forbid the adoption of broad-based income taxes.  Supporters say enshrining this principle will protect what they’ve long called “The New Hampshire Advantage”,while opponents predict it’ll tie the hands of future leaders to address state priorities.   We'll look at both sides of this debate.

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