Seabrook Nuclear plant

NH News
1:59 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Without Contract, Seabrook Nuclear Plant Will Lockout Union Workers

The company that runs the Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NextEra, could lockout 226 union workers, if they don’t come to a contract agreement by midnight Monday.  

NextEra and the Utility Workers Union are at an impasse over three items in their contract.  How much of a raise workers will receive each year; whether to eliminate 5 or 6 Fire Brigade positions, and whether to move all workers to a rotational work schedule, with overnight shifts. 

NextEra spokesman Alan Griffith says many of these concessions have already been made at other nuclear plants across the country.

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NH News
5:19 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Report: Seabrook Nuclear Plant Has Fewest Safety Violations

The Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant
Credit jim.richmond via Flickr Creative Commons

The federal Government Accountability Office says the nuclear plant at Seabrook, N.H., had the fewest number of safety violations in the Northeast from 2000 to 2012 among facilities with only one reactor.

The GAO reports the plant, which is owned by NextEra Energy, had three higher-level violations and 85 lower-level violations over the 12 years.

The Associated Press obtained a copy of the report before its release.

No other single-reactor plant in the Northeast had fewer than 106 total violations. The most, 178, were at the Hope Creek plant in Hancocks Bridge, N.J.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu August 22, 2013

The News On Nuclear Energy

Credit Jim Richmond via Flickr Creative Commons

After thirty years of no new nuclear construction, two projects are underway in the south, as some argue this carbon-emission free energy source is vital due to climate change. But concerns over safety issues remain, as well as new challenges from a booming natural gas industry. We explore the problems and prospects of nuclear energy with a New York Times reporter who has been following the debate over nuclear. 

Guest:

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NH News
11:35 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Anti-Nuclear Groups Won't Have Role In Seabrook Re-Licensing

Anti-Nuclear groups are disappointed by a recent Federal Court decision regarding their role in the Seabrook Nuclear Plant re-licensing process.

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NH News
10:10 am
Wed December 12, 2012

NRC Continues To Study Deteriorating Concrete At Seabrook

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says there are no immediate safety concerns at the Seabrook nuclear power plant.

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NH News
2:31 pm
Wed November 28, 2012

Seabrook Engineers Continue To Study Deteriorating Concrete

Alan Griffith of Seabrook Station at containment dome model.
Credit Roger Wood

Officials from the Seabrook Nuclear Plant say the plant is operating safely, despite concrete deterioration found in some structures.

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NH News
4:30 pm
Wed November 7, 2012

Court To Hear Arguments On Seabrook Re-licensing

The Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant.
Credit Jeff Cutler / Flick/Creative Commons

Anti-nuclear groups from New Hampshire--and around the country--will be in court Thursday in Boston. They will argue for inclusion into the Seabrook Nuclear Plant re-licensing process.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission rejected the groups' call for intervenor status in the plant's relicensing application. That ruling superseded that of the NRC's own Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decision to allow the groups to hold a public hearing on nuclear energy alternatives like wind energy.

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Environment
2:20 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Anti-Nuclear Groups Excluded From Seabrook Re-licensing Process

Jim Richmond

Anti-Nuclear groups are angered by a decision of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to exclude them from the re-licensing process for the Seabrook Nuclear Plant. 

A number of groups filed for intervener status so that they could file objections to the plant's extension of its operation to 2050. The coalition of environmental organizations planned to argue that renewable energy resources, such as wind power, could ultimately replace nuclear power. But the NRC ruled that their argument lacked merit, because that replacement power isn't available now.

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