seacoast

Two Seabrook Police Officers were fired Wednesday in connection with the November 2009 assault of a man who had been taken into custody.

The incident took place four and a half years ago, but didn’t become public until earlier this year, when the assault victim, now 24 year old Mike Bergeron, posted a video of the incident on YouTube.

In the video, Officers Mark Richardson and Adam Laurent are seen shoving Bergeron, then 19, headfirst into a concrete wall.

Seabrook Town Manager William Manzi says the investigation was independent and fair.

Erin Urquhart / Putting Up With Erin

About 40 foodies are expected to show up at the Seacoast’s first community Food Swap this Sunday at Frank Jones Mansion in Portsmouth. 

Organizer Erin Urquhart says it works like this:

You get together and one person says 'ok I have two cans of blueberry jam, I have two pounds of carrots, I’m willing to swap for that,' and someone behind you says 'I have a sheet of brownies that I made, I want that instead.'

Emily Corwin for NHPR

A trial has been rescheduled for a New Hampshire woman accused of giving a drug to a 19-year-old woman hours before the teen drove into some cyclists, killing two.

Foster's Daily Democrat reports the trial is scheduled for Oct. 6 for 49-year-old Cindy Sheppard of Hampton, with a final pretrial hearing on Sept. 25.

Sheppard was indicted in January on charges of dispensing a controlled drug and possession of fentanyl, cocaine and methadone.

AT&T has decided to withdraw an application to install a 130-foot cell tower in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, after residents voiced their opposition.

The Portsmouth Herald reports staff attorney Brian Grossman said AT&T is re-evaluating its network priorities, including the best way to improve wireless coverage within Portsmouth.

The company said, though, that customer demand is growing. It says 70 percent of its customers have smartphones and the amount of data handled by the national networks doubled between 2011 and 2012.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is meeting with fishermen to discuss the impact of a plan to distribute $32.8 million in federal fishery disaster funds across New England.

New Hampshire is getting more than $2 million in disaster relief with more than $900,000 going to direct assistance for New Hampshire fishermen, and more than $1.1 million being used at the state's discretion.

Robin Nystron via Flickr CC

City officials in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, say one of their oldest trees has died.

The American elm tree on Peirce Island was over 100 years old.

The Portsmouth Herald reports members of the Peirce Island Committee noticed the elm didn't sprout buds in the spring. The tree has no leaves.

Peter Loughlin, chairman of the city's Trees and Public Greenery Committee, said Dutch elm disease has killed American elms up and down the East Coast. He said the tree was the last surviving elm in the city.

Lady Liberty
Lorianne DiSabato / Flickr Creative Commons

Today's the big day at the 14th Annual Master Sand Sculpting Competition at New Hampshire's Hampton Beach.   Sculptures by some of the continent's best sand artists will be on display and be professionally judged for $15,000 in prizes that will be announced at 8 p.m. Saturday.  Sculpture fans also get to vote from 1 to 4 p.m. for the People's Choice Award.   A sand sculpting lesson will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. to those who sign up at the Chamber of Commerce office near the sculptures.    Fireworks cap off the day at 9:30.

Flickr: InAweofGod'sCreation

  Some things never change in New Hampshire – including our position as a battleground state. In 1788, eight colonies had ratified the constitution – but nine were needed to establish the United States of America.

Stephanie Seacord, with Strawbery Banke Museum, says New Hampshire was split. "There were two factions in NH," she says.  One, wanted to stay independent, the other hoped to join the union. The latter was largely based in Portsmouth and led by then-Governor John Langdon.

New Hampshire State Police have safely arrested an armed man sought in an area of southern New Hampshire near the Massachusetts border after an earlier confrontation with police at his home.

Maj. David Parenteau said Tuesday night that officers found 44-year-old Anthony Reardon back in his South Hampton home about five hours after they had condoned off the nearby area with a large police presence.

Parenteau said the first officers who came to his home Tuesday afternoon found Reardon with weapons he refused to surrender.

The city of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is a step closer to acquiring ownership of a building that's been under federal control.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says she's received a commitment from the U.S. General Services Administration to leave the McIntyre Federal Building and to work with the city to transfer ownership.

The city has long wanted ownership of the building in downtown Portsmouth.

Emily Corwin

  After six months of deliberation, the Newington planning board has approved a controversial proposal to bring up to 12 railcars of propane through the Seacoast each night. 

The company, called SEA-3, wants to transport domestic propane from oil wells in Pennsylvania and elsewhere to the Seacoast, for export by ship.

But neighborhood groups in Portsmouth, Stratham and Greenland have opposed the rail expansion, voicing concerns about moving explosive materials over aging railroad tracks.

Seal
Richard Towell / Flickr Creative Commons

The Seacoast Science Center in Rye is now handling marine mammal rescue duties in coastal New Hampshire. The center has joined the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's marine mammal stranding network. The partnership began Jan. 1, but the busy season is likely to start this spring as seal pup season begins.  Humans are more likely to encounter seals and seal pups on the beach at this time of year.  The center reminds residents that most seals they encounter on beaches are not in danger.  The center manages a 24-hour hotline for calls about animals that do appear in peril.

www.necarnegies.com

  The University System of New Hampshire voted Friday to put $54 million toward building renovations and acquisitions at UNH’s Durham Campus. 

$37 million will be spent renovating Hamilton Smith Hall, which houses UNH’s English Department, ESOL, Journalism and writing programs. The building has not been renovated in more than 30 years, and does not meet all disability and safety standards. 

Joe Plaia -- a former Marine MP and public defender and current chief hearings officer for the New Hampshire Liquor Commission --  will run again for the position of Rockingham County Attorney.  Plaia is the first Democrat in this majority-Republican county to seek the seat of suspended  Attorney, Jim Reams. 

Plaia  says the Rockingham County Attorney's Office needs to be modernized. "There's a lot we can do to save taxpayer dollars," Plaia says, "there's a lot we can do to reduce recidivism." 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

  For 36 years the Newington company Sea-3 has imported propane from Algeria and other countries. Ships come into port, off-load the fuel, and Sea-3 stores it and sells it locally. 

Then two years ago, hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in places like North Dakota led to a boom in production, and American propane actually became cheaper than foreign propane. And with that, says Sea-3s’ vice-president Paul Bogan, the company’s business model was no longer profitable.

“Essentially,” he says, “we’ve been out of business for the last couple of years.”

Terrafugia

  The Massachusetts-based company Terrafugia will test a flying car at the Pease Airport in Portsmouth over the next two weeks.  

The vehicle caters to recreational pilots who live near an airport and don’t want to rent a hangar. the "Transition" vehicle being tested at Pease looks like a small plane with wings that fold.  When folded, it fits into a one-car garage.  The vehicle is legal for driving on public roads, and is expected to cost $280,000. 

Watch Terrafugia's promotional video:

Excelglen via Flickr CC

A Bedford, N.H., man charged with possessing 49 stolen lobster traps, including some owned by a fisherman who died last summer, has pleaded guilty to several crimes and more than 100 violations.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says Kyle Basoukas pleaded guilty Monday to receiving stolen property and disturbing lobster gear, as well as 133 violations regarding his own equipment. He was given a suspended sentence of 90 days, fined more than $11,000 and had his lobster license revoked for five years.

rjzii via Flickr Creative Commons

The US Navy will offer for lease the former Naval Prison on the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.

The Navy has twice before sought private-sector redevelopment of the old Naval Prison, which closed in 1974.  It was built in 1908, and has been called the “Alcatraz of the East.”

The medieval-looking multi-story building is 265,000 square feet and has 11 and a half acres of waterfront land.

The new tenant would be responsible for ensuring structural stability in the now-dilapidated building, and cleaning up hazardous waste, including asbestos and lead paint.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Portsmouth planners say in the next six years, the city will need at least 650 more parking spaces But last year, a new parking lot championed by the then-mayor failed to gather support among city councilors. The future of parking in the city became a divisive issue in last November’s council election.

On Monday, the newly elected council took the oath of office.  It's likely this month they will begin trying to reach agreement once again on whether a new parking garage downtown will help or harm the future of Portsmouth.

 

Portsmouth police say they've made a ninth arrest in connection with a months-long heroin ring investigation.  The ninth suspect--21-year old Chelsea Glover of Milton--was arrested Friday night on charges of selling heroin. She was being held on $5,000 bail.   Seven other people have been charged with felony-level drug offenses. One was charged with misdemeanor trespassing.

The Coast Guard says salvage operations are continuing following the sinking of a barge off Portsmouth Harbor.  Officials say on one was hurt when the 40-foot work barge equipped with a crane began taking on water Saturday east of the harbor. The only person board, the barge operator, was able to escape.   It was unclear why the barge began taking on water.   The Coast Guard said Sunday that divers confirmed that all fuel tanks were intact.        

The Hampton textile  firm Foss Manufacturing Company is facing $115,000 in fines, according to the state’s Department of Labor.

That’s after a federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation discovered 21 safety hazards, following an employee complaint. 

Investigators found a substantive probability of injury or death from electrocution, burns, and amputation injuries, as well as confinement in oxygen-deficient spaces.

Republican Dan Innis, dean of the University of New Hampshire's business school, is running for Congress in the state's First District.

Innis, who also owns a Portsmouth inn with his husband, announced his campaign via an online video Wednesday. Though he's never run for office, he tells The Associated Press that the national situation is so dire with the growing deficit, national debt and Washington gridlock, that he's determined to do something about it. He says too many members of Congress let Washington change them instead of the reverse.

A 70-year-old New Hampshire man accused of killing his roommate in Hampton has several previous criminal convictions.

Peter Bartoloni is charged with second-degree murder in the death of 56-year-old Robert Roderick last week. Prosecutors say the two men had been roommates briefly before Bartoloni used a sledgehammer to kill Roderick.

Many of the furloughed Portsmouth Naval Shipyard workers soon will be back on the job.

A shipyard spokesman told the Portsmouth Herald that workers who are part of the Naval Sea System Command, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and base support are heading back to work Monday morning. Other workers are being told to contact their supervisors to see if they'll be working.

Third Person Charged In Deadly Hampton Bike Crash

Sep 26, 2013
Emily Corwin for NHPR

A third person has been charged in connection with a crash into a group of cyclists in New Hampshire over the weekend that killed two women from Massachusetts.

Nineteen-year-old Scott Martin of Seabrook is facing a charge of allowing 19-year-old Darriean Hess to drive his car without a license.

Hess, ordered held on $50,000 bail, was arraigned Wednesday via video from jail. She's charged with negligent homicide.

Forty-eight-year-old Cindy Sheppard of Hampton is charged with selling a painkiller to Hess and allowing her to drive without a license.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Three days after the tragic collision that killed two cyclists participating in the Granite State Wheelmen's Tri-state Seacoast Century, NHPR's Emily Corwin went back to the scene of the accident.  

There were no flowers left in memorial, just a train of debris, marked with orange police-paint, on the southbound shoulder.

  Police have charged a 20-year-old woman with negligent homicide in connection with a weekend crash that killed two cyclists in Hampton, N.H.

Investigators say a car driven by Darriean Hess, of Seabrook, was speeding, crossed the center line and struck a group of riders at 8:30 a.m. Saturday on a bridge during an annual long-distance ride.

Hess was also charged with assault Tuesday.

The crash killed two Massachusetts women, Pamela Wells, of South Hamilton, and Elise Bouchard, of Danvers. Two other riders were injured.

By Porro, Creative Commons, Flickr

  Drivers and cyclists aren’t always happy to share the road. After two cyclists died in a fatal car accident on Saturday morning in Hampton, tensions between those on two wheels and four -- have heated up. 

When Krystle Crossman, who lives in Manchester, first saw that two cyclists had died after being struck by a car in Hampton, her instinct was to blame them. She says "because when there are in large groups like that because of roadraces and such, they tend to go four or five abreast, instead of one or two."  

Strawbery Banke Receives $300K Donation From State Senator

Sep 16, 2013
sskennel via Flickr Creative Commons

A New Hampshire state senator has made a $300,000 donation to the Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth to construct an expanded visitor's center.

Martha Fuller Clark, a Portsmouth Democrat, said she hopes the project, which includes a new cafe along with 50 percent more space in the lecture hall, will bring more people to the 10-acre outdoor history museum.

Fuller Clark's mother, Marion Fuller, was one of the founders of Strawbery Banke, which is a National Historic Landmark.

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