seatbelts

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says New Hampshire has scored well overall in 10 areas of prevention, such as food safety and reporting infections, but it has room for improvement.   A report rates the states on each of them with a green, yellow or red mark.   The state got green ratings for food safety, preventing health care-associated infections, HIV testing laws and data reporting.

New Hampshire remains the only state that doesn’t require adults to wear seat belts and many of the people killed in the state last year in crashes were thrown from their vehicles.  

By the end of 2011 eighty-eight people had been killed in traffic accidents in the state.

About a quarter of them were either thrown completely from their vehicles or partially ejected, according to state figures.

That means they were probably not wearing seat belts.

“When people are ejected from the vehicles they are two to four times more likely to die in a crash.”