Secretary Of State

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A federal oversight agency’s review of how New Hampshire is spending $18 million in federal election money finds that the state, for the most part, follows the rules. But the back-and-forth within the audit illuminates a larger and long-running tension between the New Hampshire Secretary of State’s office and the federal elections officials.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan says the office is reevaluating its guidance to cities and towns after “handwritten confidential, non-public information” was found in the public voter checklists of more than 40 New Hampshire communities.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A pair of lawsuits were filed Wednesday challenging a controversial new voting law, SB3, just weeks before the law is set to take effect.

One legal challenge comes from the New Hampshire Democratic Party. The other is filed on behalf of the League of Women Voters of New Hampshire and three individual would-be voters.

White House Livestream

A lawsuit that sought to restrict New Hampshire's ability to share voter information with the Trump administration’s election integrity commission was resolved in court Monday. 

Both sides compromised on a plan to allow Secretary of State Bill Gardner to share scanned, unsearchable copies of local voter checklists from all wards across the state— not the larger, digitized version of that information that is collected in the central statewide voter database.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A New Hampshire lawsuit seeking to block the state from complying with a request for voter data from the Trump administration's "Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity" is back on, after a renewed request from that commission was sent out Wednesday.

NHPR Staff

A legal challenge to the New Hampshire’s plans to share voter data with the Trump administration has been put on hold, pending other legal challenges at the federal level.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

Update: The hearing was postponed Tuesday morning at the request of the New Hampshire ACLU, pending further legal action at the federal level.

One of the first legal challenges related to the Trump administration’s request for state voter files will go before a judge in Nashua Tuesday, as part of a lawsuit filed last week by the New Hampshire ACLU and two state lawmakers.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire residents can continue to safely snap photos inside the voting booth, after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up the state’s request for an appeal in a years-long battle over so-called “ballot selfies.”

Still, even after multiple judges have ruled the ban unconstitutional, Secretary of State Bill Gardner says he’s still not giving up on finding a way to wall off the practice. 

Tuesday’s nor’easter is causing a bit of commotion before it even arrives, sowing confusion about whether towns have the legal authority to reschedule their votes for better weather.

When weather reports began predicting a late winter nor’easter for this week, many towns around New Hampshire did something that sounds reasonable enough – they rescheduled the date of their town meetings.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

While President Trump and some of his allies perpetuated the (unverified and unsubstantiated) idea that out-of-state voters are being sent across the border en masse to throw New Hampshire elections, we were wondering: What can we actually know about the people who are showing up to register for the first time on Election Day?

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At first glance, one of the voting bills introduced by Representative David Bates this week would seem to be just a minor change, removing just four words from an existing statute.

The Windham Republican wants to strike part of the state law defining what it means to be a resident or inhabitant, or what it means to claim residency — specifically, the part that extends that definition to include people who intend to remain in New Hampshire "for the indefinite future." Those definitions, in turn, are used to help decide who’s eligible to vote in New Hampshire.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Lawmakers heard input Tuesday on a bill that, if left unchanged, could drastically expand the power of the Secretary of State’s office.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

It’s not unusual for local officials across New Hampshire to be asked to turn over emails or other records under the state’s right-to-know law. In Manchester, City Clerk Matt Normand estimates his office receives about 100 such requests each year.

It is unusual, however, for a city to be on the receiving end of a public records request from the state itself.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Gov. Maggie Hassan says she is likely to veto a bill that would require a person to live in the state for at least 30 days before being able to vote.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The State’s election officials are gearing up for Election Day, preparing voters and town workers to implement the state’s new voter ID law.

Back in September, the new law required poll workers to ask for an ID during the primary. The idea was to start educating voters, even though it wasn’t required to vote.

The Secretary of State’s office says around 6.5% of voters either didn’t have an ID, or refused to show one in protest of the new law.

Delaney: Obviously it’s a sensitive issue.

Vox Efx / Flickr Creative Commons

This week, the feds approved New Hampshire’s controversial new voter ID law.  But voters won’t notice much difference during the upcoming primary elections.  If you go to the polls next week and don’t have proper ID, you will still get your ballot--and a document explaining the new law.  The real change will come during the general elections in November.  Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlan says November voters coming to the polls without ID will have to sign an affidavit swearing that they are who they say they are.  Then they get to cast their votes.