Snow

Rebecca Lavoie

With more than a foot of snow forecast in some parts of the state on Tuesday, it feels like déjà vu for many towns who had to scramble to accommodate a late-breaking nor’easter that swept in on town meeting day in March 2017.

National Weather Service

A major winter storm is developing that could dump more than a foot of snow on parts of New Hampshire.

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the entire Granite State. Snow is expected to start falling around 10 a.m. Wednesday.

The warning extends to Thursday at 1 p.m.

Snow accumulation projections include: Concord, 8- to 14- inches, Keene, 9- to 15-, and Portsmouth, 9- to 13-.

The snow map produced Tuesday by the Weather Service shows a significant high end of the range. Manchester could get as much as 17 inches of snow.

Greta Tamošiunaite / Flickr

As the snow starts to melt you might notice a stark contrast in the landscape.  Maybe you were driving down the highway and noticed one shoulder was covered with snow while the other side was bare with a faint tinge of spring green shoots.  The cause?  Slope and aspect.  

File photo

New studies say a decrease in snow days as the climate changes is taking an economic toll on states like New Hampshire—as well as an environmental one.

A national report commissioned by nonprofit Protect Our Winters says when snow falls and stays on the ground, spending on winter sports tends to increase. (Read the report here.)

NHPR Photo

A fast-moving low pressure system will bring today's snow storm to New Hampshire by late morning, with most of the state expected to receive between 8 and 12 inches of snow.

The National Weather Service forecast calls for snow to begin falling at about 11 a.m., and the front will clear out of the Granite State by 11 p.m.

There is a winter storm warning for most of New Hampshire. The Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for the Seacoast towns, which will see less snowfall, according to projections.

NWS

New Hampshire could get up to a foot of snow from Wednesday's storm, according to the National Weather Service forecast. 

A winter storm watch is in effect from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Wednesday.

The seacoast and southern Rockingham County is expected to get less snow, but the forecast still calls for 6- to 8- inches. The snow could switch to a mix of sleet and rain in the Seacoast region in the late afternoon.

Snowfall is expected to be heaviest in late afternoon and during the evening commute, with up to 2 inches falling an hour.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The winter storm that began overnight will result in 3- to 6- inches of snow accumulation for most of New Hampshire before leaving the region by early evening.

Gov. Chris Sununu says the state Emergency Operations Center opened at 6 a.m. to monitor the impact on this morning's commute. Major highways are posted 45 mph top speed.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

MONDAY Night update: The forecast calls for high wind gusts and drifting snow Monday evening, with a cold front sweeping over New Hampshire for the coming days.

The National Weather Service has a hazardous weather outlook for the region. A combination of strong winds and cold will mean a chance of dangerous wind chill values through the end of the week, the Weather Service says.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  New Hampshire communities are being asked for damage assessments from the March 14 nor'easter to see if the state meets the threshold for federal assistance.

State Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Perry Plummer says the state "may be in the ballpark" of meeting the threshold, which could result in a request from Gov. Chris Sununu for a major disaster declaration.

The nor'easter dropped more than a foot of snow in many areas, caused blizzard conditions and winds that damaged trees and utilities, leaving more than 55,000 customers powerless.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The biggest snowstorm of the season hit New Hampshire Sunday through Monday, leaving up to a foot and a half of snow in some parts of the state.

Most schools were closed and hundreds experienced power outages from winds of up to 35 miles per hour.

But that didn’t stop some people from getting out in Manchester.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Parts of New England, including New Hampshire, are expected to receive at least a foot of snow thanks in part to something known as a weather bomb, or, for the logophiles out there, “bombogenesis.” Why is this storm considered “bombogenesis”? For that answer, we turn to Mark Breen. He’s a meteorologist at the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

What is bombogenesis?

I think that’s a really cool catchphrase what is probably a more boring title. It’s known as “explosive cyclogenesis.”

Sara Plourde, NHPR

Increasing snowfall rates are expected across parts of New England into this evening, with snowfall rates upwards of 1-1.5 inches per hour possible across the region.

Later this evening, a more intense snowfall band may produce rates upwards of two inches per hour across portions of southern/central New Hampshire, and western and southern Maine.

A winter storm warning is in effect until 5 a.m. Friday.

Sean Hurley

We really only have one word for snow.  Yes, meteorologists might talk of stellar dendrites or graupels or aggregates – but when it snows, in English at least, we say "It snows."  But this dearth of words doesn’t mean there’s any lack of ways to think about snow.  

Susan Lirakis

With winter weather on the way, NHPR's Chris Martin sat down to talk to meteorologist Tony Vazzano, who specializes in mountain weather and snow. His company, North Winds Weather, provides specialized weather reports to ski areas across northern New England.

Greta Tamošiunaite / Flickr

As the snow starts to melt you might notice a stark contrast in the landscape.  Maybe you were driving down the highway and noticed one shoulder was covered with snow while the other side was bare with a faint tinge of spring green shoots.  The cause?  Slope and aspect.  

Chris Jensen for NHPR

The warm winter is having a terrible impact on businesses tied to snowmobiles and logging, says Wayne Frizzell the president of the North Country Chamber of Commerce and a Colebrook native.

Dave Herholz via Flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/FMVAH

On today’s show we’ve got a detailed profile of the late Aaron Schwartz - the cofounder of Reddit whose actions triggered a federal indictment, and whose death has made him a martyr for the free internet movement.

Also today, truth in advertising? Think again. From TV ads, to menus and billboards, we all know food photography looks too good to be edible- today we'll hear the truth behind those perfectly crisped turkeys, immaculately sculpted ice cream cones, and more.  

Susan Lirakis

With winter weather on the way, NHPR's Chris Martin sat down to talk to meteorologist Tony Vazzano, who specializes in mountain weather and snow. His company, North Winds Weather, provides specialized weather reports to ski areas across northern New England.

Greta Tamošiunaite / Flickr

As the snow starts to melt you might notice a stark contrast in the landscape.  Maybe you were driving down the highway and noticed one shoulder was covered with snow while the other side was bare with a faint tinge of spring green shoots.  The cause?  Slope and aspect.  

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Think about the shape of an icicle: it’s pointy at the end and wider at the base. But why are they that shape? The key thing to remember when talking about icicles is that icicles are long and skinny because the tip is growing faster than the base. And there are 3 reasons for why that is:

Every drip, as it travels down the icicle, carries heat away. This is because water is an incredible vehicle for conducting heat. It has the highest specific heat of any material we know of. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

February was a brutally cold and snowy month for New Hampshire, but just how bad was it?

State Climatologist Mary Stampone joined Morning Edition to share some facts and figures from the past month of winter weather.

Put February into context for us. It was cold, but was this the coldest February in state history?

It is likely to be one of the coldest Februarys on record throughout much of the state. Some stations it’ll likely be the coldest, while at some others it will be within the top five coldest.

Alexey Kljatov via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/JBzMe

After spending weeks and weeks surrounded by snow piles that are several feet high, it’s easy to forget that those huge piles are made of tiny snowflakes. And no two snowflakes are alike – or at least that’s what we’ve all heard.

Kevo Thomson via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/2kheg

We may not know who will bring home Oscars tonight, but two things are certain: a-list actresses will walk the red carpet, and they will be asked the standard question: “Who are you wearing?”

On today’s show, why some Hollywood actresses are bucking against the red carpet parade.

Then, Selma, Gone Girl, and Interstellar are among this year’s Oscar snubs. We’ll approach the academy’s cold-shoulder from a different angle, and reveal entire categories notably absent from the awards.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Rob Carolan with Hometown Forecast says an unpredictable ‘trough’ of low pressure sitting in the Atlantic is poised to bring some possible snow to the seacoast area this afternoon.

Snow Plow
Nedra / Flickr Creative Commons

  We have another snowstorm in store for the state tomorrow afternoon but, Steve LaVoie with Hometown Forecast Service reports New Hampshire will be largely spared the worst of it.

“Looks like the amounts are generally gonna be a quick inch or two. The North Country may not see anything at all, actually. The best chance of any higher snowfall amounts will be along the seacoast again.”

He says there might be another round of snow showers Wednesday.

Scott Hamlin via Flickr CC

Residents in 30 apartments had to evacuate a large complex in Nashua Tuesday night when part of a roof collapsed from heavy snow. No injuries were reported, but city officials are urging resident and building owners to monitor the snow loads on their roofs to prevent further incidents.

The storms from the last two weeks dropped close to four feet of snow in the Nashua region. And that creates safety risks for drivers, walkers and homeowners.

Heavy snow caused a roof collapse in a Nashua apartment building.

Snow Plow
Nedra / Flickr Creative Commons

Following a string a major winter storms, the state’s budget for snow cleanup and removal is running ahead of where it normally would be this time of year.

Department of Transportation Spokesman Bill Boynton says the total cost of last week’s blizzard came in at $2 million.

“Well certainly, it’s been a challenging last week or so with three major events,” Boynton said Monday. “We’ve spent $26 million going into today out of a $45 million budget, but we’ll keep going out there for as long as it takes.”

Derrick Coetzee / Flickr CC

A winter storm is expected to blanket all of New Hampshire with several inches of snow today.

Rob Carolan with Hometown Forecast says the hardest snow will hit right during the Monday morning commute.

“The afternoon commute may be a little better,” he said. “By that time, the snow should have lightened up considerably.”

He said. the state’s southern half will likely see seven to fourteen inches of snow.

“There may be a few areas that do better than that in the Merrimack Valley towards the Seacoast,” he said.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

In a series of comic books, Joel Christian Gill shines a light on unsung African American figures from history. On today’s show, he tells us why he’s launched a campaign against Black History Month, and makes the case that #28DaysAreNotEnough.

Then, an outbreak of measles traced to Disneyland has outraged parents and cast anti-vaccine advocates as dangers to the public. We’ll hear about a propaganda tool that targeted anti-vaxxers in 18th Century France: fashionable hats!

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Snow Plow
Nedra / Flickr Creative Commons

A winter storm is headed our way for the weekend.

Rob Carolan with Hometown Forecast says snow will start falling Saturday morning, between 6 and 8.

“This is mainly going to be a storm for the southern half of the state. It looks like south of the White Mountains is where the worst of it is going to be, particularly the Merrimack Valley and the Seacoast,” he said.

He says that region could see as much as seven inches.

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