Snowsgiving

When severe weather knocks out power to tens of thousands of homes and businesses, utility crews work around the clock to restore service. But somebody is always going to be the last one to get plugged back in...and it could be you.

This story was originally published in November, 2014.

If you’re already waiting around for the power to come back on, it’s too late to do prep like charging batteries or buying a generator. But there are some things you can do right now to protect your home and family…and maybe even reclaim some creature comforts.

Michael Brindley / NHPR

Tens of thousands of New Hampshire residents woke up without power on Thanksgiving morning. With conditions even worse than predicted, it took several days for some areas to regain power. We're looking at the response to the storm and the condition of our electric grid, and taking your comments about how New Hampshire and it's utilities could better deal with severe weather and power outages. 

Guests:

Sam Evans-Brown, NHPR's Environment Reporter

Perry Plummer - Director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Michael Brindley for NHPR

Gov. Maggie Hassan said Wednesday's nor'easter was worse than the state's utilities and officials had prepared for. 

"We know this was a unique storm, the snow is heavier and wetter than predicted, and that’s really had an impact. But the utilities have been getting extra crews here as fast as they can, and I think they were planning for a significant event, but our weather experts tell us this is heavier wetter and more snow than they thought it would be."