Sports

Sports news

  The University of New Hampshire Wildcats Football playoff run ended Saturday in South Dakota.

South Dakota State University defeated UNH 56-14 in the NCAA Division 1 FCS Playoffs. 

UNH found itself in a hole from the beginning. South Dakota State scored 21 points in the first quarter, and 28 unanswered points in the first half.

The Wildcats finish 9-5 on the season. South Dakota State moves on to face James Madison on Dec. 16.

  The University of New Hampshire Wildcats upset the Central Arkansas Bears in the second round of the FCS football playoffs Saturday.

They move on to face South Dakota State University in the quarter finals on Dec. 9 at 3 p.m.

A close game throughout, UNH dominated on defense and emerged with a 21-15 victory. The Wildcats recovered two fumbles and pulled down two interceptions.

South Dakota State University is the No. 5 seed.

Saturday's win was the 150th career victory for UNH head coach Sean McDonnell. UNH is now 9-4 on the season.

Courtesy, UNH Football

 Quarterback Trevor Knight, a junior from Amherst, N.H., threw for 299 yards and a touchdown as the University of New Hampshire Wildcats defeated Central Connecticut State University 14-0 on Saturday. 

The Wildcats move to 8-4 on the season and advance to the second-round playoffs Dec. 2 against Central Arkansas. 

AP

Bode Miller, the world-class ski racer who grew up carving turns at Cannon Mountain in Franconia, N.H., will be at the Winter Olympics as an analyst for NBC.

Awareness of the severity of concussions among young athletes has continued to spread among parents and schools within the last few years.

Meanwhile, the athletic staff at Kennett Middle and High Schools in North Conway have seen a decline in concussions among their students.

Neal Weaver is the athletic director for Kennett High School. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with him by phone about the school’s efforts to reduce the number of concussions among athletes.

This transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.

https://flic.kr/p/bp6atk
Keith Allison / Flickr

The New England Patriots will play its first game of the official season Thursday evening against the Kansas City Chiefs.

Chad Finn, sports reporter for the Boston Globe, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to give a preview of the game and the Patriots’ upcoming season.

You know I'm wondering what you think the prospects are for the Patriots and chiefs tonight.

In a stats-driven sport like baseball, it seems we know everything there is to know about a player. From batting average to a pitcher's power finesse ratio.

Measuring a player's ability isn't limited to his or her skill. There's also a wealth of information in an athlete's body.

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, children of all ages!

I always wanted to use that in a commentary, that wonderful circus introduction ballyhooed by the splendid ringmaster, but I could just never find the ideal spot.

Of course, had I, there would've been some people who'd say that a circus doesn't belong in with sports. But, hey, just because there's clowns around doesn't disqualify certain daredevils from being certified athletes ­­-- equestrians, tightrope walkers and those who fly through the air with the greatest of ease.

In days of yore, Opening Day of the baseball season was special, signifying that spring had come at last.

Today, however, Opening Day sort of dribbles into existence, and the spiritual start of spring now belongs to the Masters golf tournament, where the azaleas and magnolias and dogwood bloom. And if they dare look like they're gonna bloom too soon, in March the groundskeepers are rumored to pack them with ice to make sure spring comes as God intended it, which this year is on Thursday.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

With a new baseball season just around the corner - new baseball season - there are some proposed new rules aimed at making America's national pastime less passive. But commentator Frank Deford says, foul ball.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Big time athletes really put their professional careers on the line if they decide to stand up for a social cause, and commentator Frank Deford says this is something that's been going on in sports for decades.

Since too few Americans go to the polls, I say what this country needs is a bobblehead election, where voters will get free bobblehead dolls of their choice when they show up and vote for president.

Hey, it works in sports. And what sports needs is some kind of uniform, sensible policy relating to suspensions.

Olympic.org

If you’re looking for a local angle on this year’s 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, we’ve got you covered.

Here’s a roundup of reports on who’s repping the Granite State at this summer’s games, when to watch those athletes on the field and how everyone else, back in New Hampshire, is looking forward to following along.

In the television era, the second week of the Olympics is reserved for what is considered the marquee event: track and field.

So, the shared premier showcases of the first week are swimming and women's gymnastics. While swimming was always a spotlight sport, I was, if you will, sort of present at the creation when gymnastics became the new star lead-off hitter.

Pete Rose may not make the Hall of Fame, but a statue of him is going to be erected outside the Cincinnati Reds' ballpark. Statues of sports stars are all the rage — especially in baseball. There are already seven other players frozen in statuary in Cincinnati, nine in St. Louis, six in both Baltimore and Detroit. It makes the legendary Monument Park in Yankee Stadium look like some drab wall in a hospital with the names of donors on plaques. Sports plaques seem so Rotary Club now.

A few years ago during an interview, Dave Pear, a former defensive lineman with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, suddenly, without warning, grabbed me — his huge thumb and forefinger pinching my poor neck. It was only for a few seconds, but my knees started to buckle and the pain shot through me. Calmly then, Dave said, "That's how I used to feel all day long."

On Thursday, it'll be three months till the Olympics begin. Usually, there'd be a panic by now that construction was way behind schedule, but, incredibly, only a couple of major projects remain incomplete in Rio.

No, rather the question remains how much can go haywire during the games to distract us from our enchanting presidential campaign.

Click the audio to hear Frank Deford's take on this issue.

Rafa Bahiense

A group of New England Patriots fans have sued the NFL in an effort to recover the first-round draft pick that was taken from the team as punishment for the "Deflategate" scandal.

The suit filed Tuesday in federal court in Boston says the NFL made an "arbitrary and capricious" decision to revoke the draft pick even though there is no proof that the team deliberately deflated footballs. 

It was not that long ago when the accepted wisdom in football was that the running game had to be established — that was always the obligatory verb: established — before passes could become effective. My, we know how that has changed. Now the pass is established from the get-go, and running is an afterthought.

Sean Hurley

Last week the top ski jumpers from high schools across New Hampshire gathered for the Ski Jump State Championship in Plymouth.  But as NHPR's Sean Hurley reports, the event almost didn't happen.

15 year old Plymouth sophomore Luke Johnstone remembers the old ski jump. "I didn't like it too much," he says. "It was pretty scary.  Little wobbly up at the top there. So I didn't really like it too much."

I firmly believe that football games are best when both the quarterbacks are stars, which is what we've definitely got Sunday.

Yeah, yeah, I know: Defense wins games and a football takes funny bounces, and, as every bad analyst regularly declares, man, those turnovers can kill you, but football absolutely needs quarterbacks. Otherwise, the sport only has all those faceless battalions of fungible gladiators.

Dear People of St. Louis:

I want you to be good sports. Yes, you lost an NFL franchise, but that's just the way it is in America. Owners own teams so that they might move them to another municipality with better luxury boxes. Get over it.

Even New York, premier city of the world, has lost teams. So did glitzy, glamorous LA. Chicago? Hey, it was St. Louis that took the football Cardinals from Chicago before Phoenix took the Cardinals from St. Louis so that St. Louis could take the Rams from Los Angeles. And so on.

Much as we talk about certain financial institutions that may be too big to fail, you can be absolutely certain that the one organization in the whole wide world that truly fits that definition is FIFA, the grubby behemoth that runs soccer. Too many international sports associations are rife with corruption, but the graft exposed at FIFA beggars the imagination.

We start 2016 with a command: that the subject of Pete Rose and the Hall of Fame is over, finis, kaput forever and ever. As sure as we will no longer discuss whether Lindsey Graham or George Pataki can be president. The new commissioner has been even more adamant in dismissing Rose's pleadings, so it doesn't matter how passionately you feel — it is a dead issue. There.

Until Dec. 12, the Golden State Warriors were undefeated, 24-0. They're the popular NBA defending champs, who play a fun style, led by an absolutely beguiling star, Stephen Curry. It's hard enough to draw attention away from the NFL, but the Warriors caught the public fancy, going for the record of most consecutive wins ever in major league sports.

Then a mediocre Milwaukee team clobbered them, and back everybody's attention went to Tom Brady, the Carolina Panthers and the point spreads of the week.

I love corny sports terminology. My favorite newspaper word is "tilt," meaning game. Have you ever, even once in your life, heard anybody speak the word "tilt" when they mean game? No, you haven't.

The best term in broadcast is "shaken up." The quarterback could have his throwing arm ripped from his body, and the announcer would say he is "shaken up." Have you ever, even once in your life, heard anybody use the expression "shaken up," when they mean hurt real bad? No, you haven't.

Click the audio to find out Frank Deford's favorite sports word.

The spectacular global terrorism that's been so prominent lately can best be dated from 1972, when 11 Israeli Olympians were murdered at the Munich Games. That seminal atrocity has taken on even more horror, too, now that we've learned that some of the victims suffered mutilation and torture before they died.

We may take some solace, though, that, after 43 years, the construction of a monument to the Israelis has finally begun and will be unveiled next October. Pointedly and poignantly, it stands barely more than a hundred yards from where the Israelis were first taken hostage.

Sports gets bigger all the time, everywhere. But even with a superabundance of sport, that's not enough to satisfy our appetites, and so now we have to have make-believe sport, too. Who would've ever thought we would bet real money on our sports fantasies?

Maybe H.L. Mencken was right when he said: "I hate all sports as rabidly as a person who likes sports hates common sense." And Mencken didn't even know about Ultimate Fighting or the halfpipe of snowboarding.

When the Royals won the World Series, I, like most everyone else, was so happy for the good people of Kansas City, because I kept being reminded that the Royals hadn't won since 1985. Poor, poor little KC. Then it occurred to me: so what? That's exactly how long it should be, because there are 30 major league franchises, so for any team to win once every 30 years is just par for the course.

Pages