Sports

Fernando Stankuns via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5tSdbv

Presidential candidates talk a lot about what they'll do to jump start the economy. But what about local TV stations that rely on campaign ads to pay the bills? They're hurting. Today on the show, it may feel like all campaign, all the time, but not on TV.

And, the Rio Olympics have ended - and green pool and Ryan Lochte-gate aside, it wasn't half the disaster people feared. But now with the Paralympics just around the corner, and only a fraction of tickets sold, disaster might just get another chance.

Blaise Alleyne via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/54QttY

Want to guess how America's internet speed stack up to the rest of the world? Not even top 20... That means below Mongolia, Slovenia and dozens of other countries.Today, find out why the leader of the free world lags so far behind in fast -and affordable - access.

Plus, love is complicated. Most people can agree that they want love in their life, but we are messy, imperfect beings and a lot of ways to get it wrong. From sibling resentments to misguided crushes to good old self delusion, one podcast is jumping in to take a closer look at love in all its forms.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

It's NASCAR weekend in New Hampshire, and the state is expecting an influx of race fans over the weekend.

Ulf Bodin via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/qwhVkN

Public concern about concussions has mostly centered around football and other male-dominated sports. But another population experiences concussions at an even higher rate...female athletes. Today, some alarming research on the frequency, diagnosis and treatment of concussions in women and girls.

Then, we may be on the verge of the next major milestone in long-distance running: the sub two-hour marathon - that's if one scientist has his way. So, can new technology, training and even genetic selection make people run long distances even faster?

Concussions: What We Know Now and How to Respond

Apr 6, 2016
David Hassler / Flickr/CC

With the NFL recently admitting that repeated blows to the head can cause degenerative brain disease, we take a time-out to scan the research on brain trauma, including innovations in reducing incidents and assessing concussions.  But is what we're learning discouraging participation in contact sports? And is rising concern over brain injury backed by science?

Thomas Hawk via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5VMVjQ

In 2013, journalist Adrienne LaFrance scanned her own reporting and found that only 25% of people mentioned in her reporting were women. Two years later she did the same thing. The result was…disappointing. Today, a reporter owns up to perpetuating gender bias.

Then, from TV's campy crusader to the Dark Knight, Batman has been reflected American anxieties and social norms for almost 80 years. We'll explore his appeal as a mere mortal among superhumans, making him a magnet for our heroic dreams. 

Chilli Head via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5NjCc2

As Super Tuesday results came in last night, Google searches for how to move to Canada spiked 350%. Whether Obama in '08, or Trump in 2016, a surprising number of people threaten "if so and so gets elected, I'm outta here". But where would they go?  Today, when Americans commit  self-imposed political exile.

And there's no farther place to travel than outer space - we'll talk to the designer behind one of NASA's viral ad campaigns, a beautiful set of travel posters that put a fifties spin on space tourism. 

10.11.15: Sportsball

Oct 9, 2015
Drew Geraets via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/769ED3

From dreaming of the big leagues to a roller derby revival— today, we enter the wild and wacky world of sports, starting with the origin story of the most successful non-carbonated beverage in the US and a staple of the pro sports sidelines: Gatorade. Plus, for a long time, being a Red Sox fan was to be an outsider, hardcore. That hard living, punk attitude motivated a group of teenagers to produce the most popular, and aggressive, T-shirt in Boston history. We’ll hear the Hollywood-worthy story behind the “Yankees Suck” t-shirt.

Roadsidepictures via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/awowKc

As autumn progresses, it’s getting to be time to turn up the thermostat, and pile on the blankets. Or maybe not. On today’s show, we consider the benefits of being cold. And, we explore the curious history of one of sports’ key beverages: Gatorade.

Light Brigading via flickr CC / flic.kr/p/kPKiL6

Harvard, like other prestigious Ivy League schools, is a non-profit. Still, its 36-billion dollar endowment is bigger than the GDP of Jamaica. Plus, a poll finds that forty-four percent of families in low-income, low-education households with a high school athlete think their kid has a chance at the majors – we’ll hear about the myth of pro sports as viable career option.  And look into the secretive underworld of illegally modified softball bats.

You could say 36-year-old Matt Ray works in paradise — on a barrier island off the Florida's southern coast. As athletic director of the Anna Maria Island Community Center, Ray is doing what he loves.

"I grew up playing sports," he says. "I actually played two years of college basketball. So sports have pretty much been my entire life."

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady can suit up for his team’s season opener after a judge erased his four-game suspension for “Deflategate.”

The surprise ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard Berman came Thursday after more than one month of failed settlement talks between the NFL and its players’ union. Many legal experts believed the judge was merely pressuring the sides to settle when he criticized the NFL’s handling of the case at two hearings in August.

But the judge wasn’t posturing.

Courtesy the Manchester Historic Association

When the Manchester Monarchs won their only league championship this year, and then promptly moved to California, it had to be the weirdest thing that’s ever happened in New Hampshire sports, right?

Not even close.

Over the years, New Hampshire teams have been involved in some of the strangest moves to have ever happened on a court or a field. In fact, you could make a case that the Granite State may be the one of the weirdest places in America for sports.

Todd Lappin via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/5TtMrL

Tug of War, Capture the Flag, Croquet ... for many, these games are childhood staples: hours of outdoor fun until the fireflies come out and it's time for bed. We talked to Paul Tukey, co-author of the book "Tag, Toss, And Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games" about some of the classics and up-and-coming games. We compiled some random facts about five of our favorite games -- and links to rules, so you can play them!

We've also got a survey at the end of the post, tell us your favorite lawn game.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

On Sunday night, the U.S. Womens Soccer team goes up against Japan in the World Cup Final. Ten year old soccer player Abby Bentley of Newmarket is looking forward to the game. NHPR's Emily Coriwn met up with Bentley at a summer camp held by Seacoast United in Hampton, N.H.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

For the first time this year, the Exeter Classic – a “criterium” style bike race – offered equal prize money in their pro women's race as their pro men’s race.  In September, the Portsmouth Criterium will also offer an equal purse to women for the first time.

Top female bike racers say regional race directors in New England and Northern California are pushing national and international governing bodies toward equality for women as they make room for women’s races and attract sponsors for equal prize money.

Same Name, Different League: Monarchs Fans Set To Cheer For A Whole New Team

Jun 17, 2015
: Elaine and David Rugh of Derry, season ticket holders since Day 1. Photo by Carol Robidoux

Some local hockey fans are trying to understand why the Manchester Monarchs are leaving town just days after winning the only league championship in their fifteen-year history.


Logan Shannon / NHPR

With thousands of empty luxury apartments in China’s new cities, desperate measures are being taken to lure buyers. On today’s show, we’ll explore the booming business of renting foreigners as props to give these ghostly city centers an air of international glamour.   

Then we hit the pitch for an inside look at the world’s greatest sports rivalry, between the Pakistan and Indian cricket teams, and what it reveals about the complicated relationship between the nations.

www.flickr.com/photos/wonker/

The Red Sox and the Yankees, Ali versus Frazier, the Boston Celtics and the L.A. Lakers. These are some of America's most notable sports rivalries, but they’ve got nothing on international cricket. On today’s show, we explore the epic sports rivalry between India and Pakistan.

Plus, everybody knows about the Titanic - so how come nobody remembers the sinking of the Sultana, the deadliest maritime disaster in American history?  We explore why some of the biggest historical events don’t take up much space in the history books. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Kale Poland does ultra-marathons, but that sport's name is a little misleading, as it now encompasses a lot of really long races of every sort, including triathlons. You may have heard of the Ironman competition: 2.5 mile swim, 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon. 

But not for Kale Poland. He has done many 50-mile running races, of course, also a few double-ironman races, even triple and quintuple ironman distance events. But in 2012, he was the seventh American ever to complete what he calls a “deca”. That’s ten times the distance of an Ironman.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cc_chapman/4878972642/in/photostream/" target="blank">CC Chapman</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

There’s been no shortage of controversies recently when it comes to questions of whether teams are playing by the rules, as well as the on- and off-the-field conduct of professional athletes.

But how do leagues respond when these situations arise?

A panel discussion Thursday night at the University of New Hampshire School of Law co-sponsored by Sports Illustrated will explore personal conduct and fair play policies in professional sports.

Flickr-Anselmo Sousa

The media often portray Sweden as a modernist utopia where blond-haired trend makers export upbeat pop music, hip furniture and meat balls, and parents enjoy unparalleled family leave. On today’s show we debunk the myth of the Scandinavian utopia. Then, we’ll talk about the clear difference between ordinary obsession and the disease known as obsessive-compulsive disorder. And Bill Littlefield talks about his favorite sportswriters, and reads from his new collection of athletics-inspired poetry.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.


Felipe Tofani via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qrT32G

In a rare move, Fox News apologized for referring to areas in Europe as Muslim-only “no-go zones.” On today’s show: the origins of the “no-go-zone” myth, and why it persists.

Then, we tackle a very different kind of origin story—the curious experiments that launched the most successful non-carbonated beverage in the U.S.: Gatorade.

And we continue our series on offbeat college courses: The Uncommon Core. Today: "Zombies in Popular Media".

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Concord resident and White's Park neighbor Jonathan Smith

Nearly 100 teams competed this weekend in an annual tournament that celebrates New Hampshire's hockey heritage.

The 1883 Black Ice Pond Hockey Championship is named for the year the nation's first organized hockey game was played on a frozen pond at St. Paul's School in Concord.

The tournament, which was created in 2011, is held on the pond at White Park. Teams compete 4-on-4 with no goalies and no nets — the goals are boxes with slots cut into them.

This year's championship started Friday, ended Sunday and includes 92 teams in six divisions.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Introduction to Turfgrass Management,  Golf Course Design and Construction , Turfgrass management and Irrigation, & Golf Course Management

“There is a split between students that like to play golf and students interested in horticulture, but I think that sometimes there’s a blend of both.  I think that it is important to be able to play golf, to understand the rules and the concerns of the players.”

The New England Patriots are headed to the Super Bowl.

But there is a flat, squishy cloud over the Patriots' 45-7 victory against the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday: The NFL is looking into allegations that the Patriots deflated the football to give themselves an advantage.

Two scientists say that "deflate-gate" isn't entirely hot air.

As a cold rain poured down, the New England Patriots crushed the Super Bowl dreams of the Indianapolis Colts with a 45-7 victory.

The Patriots established their lead early, scoring two touchdowns in the first quarter. The Colts scored one touchdown in the second quarter, but after a Patriots field goal, New England still entered halftime 10 points in the lead.

Bill Littlefield's Favorite Sports Books...Right Now

Dec 4, 2014

If you're shopping for a sports fan this holiday season, Bill Littlefield host of NPR's Only a Game, has some suggestions for new titles that he considers his favorites, right now.

We can all remember our favorite sports movies – but what about our favorite sports-based books? On today’s show, Bill Littlefield of NPR’s Only A Game talks about his favorite sportswriters, and reads from his new collection of athletics inspired poetry. 

Then, we tackle another competition of sorts: passing the knowledge, the notoriously difficult test that every London cabbie has to take before he or she can get behind the wheel of a black taxi.

Plus a look at how and why the basketball shot clock came to be from Roman Mars’ podcast, 99% Invisible.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

VGo/NHPR Staff

Football faces increasing criticism as mounting evidence shows the dangers of concussions, in particular undiagnosed concussions.

A new telehealth initiative at Dartmouth College aims to eliminate those undiagnosed concussions by bringing neurosurgeons to the sidelines--via robot.

On the sidelines of the Dartmouth/Penn football game, neurosurgeon Robert Singer watches carefully.

"A lot of these hits are shoulder hits. What we’re looking for are direct head to head kind of contact, that type of thing."

Pages