Sports

Todd Lappin via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/5TtMrL

Tug of War, Capture the Flag, Croquet ... for many, these games are childhood staples: hours of outdoor fun until the fireflies come out and it's time for bed. We talked to Paul Tukey, co-author of the book "Tag, Toss, And Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games" about some of the classics and up-and-coming games. We compiled some random facts about five of our favorite games -- and links to rules, so you can play them!

We've also got a survey at the end of the post, tell us your favorite lawn game.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

On Sunday night, the U.S. Womens Soccer team goes up against Japan in the World Cup Final. Ten year old soccer player Abby Bentley of Newmarket is looking forward to the game. NHPR's Emily Coriwn met up with Bentley at a summer camp held by Seacoast United in Hampton, N.H.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

For the first time this year, the Exeter Classic – a “criterium” style bike race – offered equal prize money in their pro women's race as their pro men’s race.  In September, the Portsmouth Criterium will also offer an equal purse to women for the first time.

Top female bike racers say regional race directors in New England and Northern California are pushing national and international governing bodies toward equality for women as they make room for women’s races and attract sponsors for equal prize money.

Same Name, Different League: Monarchs Fans Set To Cheer For A Whole New Team

Jun 17, 2015
: Elaine and David Rugh of Derry, season ticket holders since Day 1. Photo by Carol Robidoux

Some local hockey fans are trying to understand why the Manchester Monarchs are leaving town just days after winning the only league championship in their fifteen-year history.


Logan Shannon / NHPR

With thousands of empty luxury apartments in China’s new cities, desperate measures are being taken to lure buyers. On today’s show, we’ll explore the booming business of renting foreigners as props to give these ghostly city centers an air of international glamour.   

Then we hit the pitch for an inside look at the world’s greatest sports rivalry, between the Pakistan and Indian cricket teams, and what it reveals about the complicated relationship between the nations.

www.flickr.com/photos/wonker/

The Red Sox and the Yankees, Ali versus Frazier, the Boston Celtics and the L.A. Lakers. These are some of America's most notable sports rivalries, but they’ve got nothing on international cricket. On today’s show, we explore the epic sports rivalry between India and Pakistan.

Plus, everybody knows about the Titanic - so how come nobody remembers the sinking of the Sultana, the deadliest maritime disaster in American history?  We explore why some of the biggest historical events don’t take up much space in the history books. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Kale Poland does ultra-marathons, but that sport's name is a little misleading, as it now encompasses a lot of really long races of every sort, including triathlons. You may have heard of the Ironman competition: 2.5 mile swim, 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon. 

But not for Kale Poland. He has done many 50-mile running races, of course, also a few double-ironman races, even triple and quintuple ironman distance events. But in 2012, he was the seventh American ever to complete what he calls a “deca”. That’s ten times the distance of an Ironman.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cc_chapman/4878972642/in/photostream/" target="blank">CC Chapman</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

There’s been no shortage of controversies recently when it comes to questions of whether teams are playing by the rules, as well as the on- and off-the-field conduct of professional athletes.

But how do leagues respond when these situations arise?

A panel discussion Thursday night at the University of New Hampshire School of Law co-sponsored by Sports Illustrated will explore personal conduct and fair play policies in professional sports.

Flickr-Anselmo Sousa

The media often portray Sweden as a modernist utopia where blond-haired trend makers export upbeat pop music, hip furniture and meat balls, and parents enjoy unparalleled family leave. On today’s show we debunk the myth of the Scandinavian utopia. Then, we’ll talk about the clear difference between ordinary obsession and the disease known as obsessive-compulsive disorder. And Bill Littlefield talks about his favorite sportswriters, and reads from his new collection of athletics-inspired poetry.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.


Felipe Tofani via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qrT32G

In a rare move, Fox News apologized for referring to areas in Europe as Muslim-only “no-go zones.” On today’s show: the origins of the “no-go-zone” myth, and why it persists.

Then, we tackle a very different kind of origin story—the curious experiments that launched the most successful non-carbonated beverage in the U.S.: Gatorade.

And we continue our series on offbeat college courses: The Uncommon Core. Today: "Zombies in Popular Media".

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Concord resident and White's Park neighbor Jonathan Smith

Nearly 100 teams competed this weekend in an annual tournament that celebrates New Hampshire's hockey heritage.

The 1883 Black Ice Pond Hockey Championship is named for the year the nation's first organized hockey game was played on a frozen pond at St. Paul's School in Concord.

The tournament, which was created in 2011, is held on the pond at White Park. Teams compete 4-on-4 with no goalies and no nets — the goals are boxes with slots cut into them.

This year's championship started Friday, ended Sunday and includes 92 teams in six divisions.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Introduction to Turfgrass Management,  Golf Course Design and Construction , Turfgrass management and Irrigation, & Golf Course Management

“There is a split between students that like to play golf and students interested in horticulture, but I think that sometimes there’s a blend of both.  I think that it is important to be able to play golf, to understand the rules and the concerns of the players.”

The New England Patriots are headed to the Super Bowl.

But there is a flat, squishy cloud over the Patriots' 45-7 victory against the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday: The NFL is looking into allegations that the Patriots deflated the football to give themselves an advantage.

Two scientists say that "deflate-gate" isn't entirely hot air.

As a cold rain poured down, the New England Patriots crushed the Super Bowl dreams of the Indianapolis Colts with a 45-7 victory.

The Patriots established their lead early, scoring two touchdowns in the first quarter. The Colts scored one touchdown in the second quarter, but after a Patriots field goal, New England still entered halftime 10 points in the lead.

Bill Littlefield's Favorite Sports Books...Right Now

Dec 4, 2014

If you're shopping for a sports fan this holiday season, Bill Littlefield host of NPR's Only a Game, has some suggestions for new titles that he considers his favorites, right now.

We can all remember our favorite sports movies – but what about our favorite sports-based books? On today’s show, Bill Littlefield of NPR’s Only A Game talks about his favorite sportswriters, and reads from his new collection of athletics inspired poetry. 

Then, we tackle another competition of sorts: passing the knowledge, the notoriously difficult test that every London cabbie has to take before he or she can get behind the wheel of a black taxi.

Plus a look at how and why the basketball shot clock came to be from Roman Mars’ podcast, 99% Invisible.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

VGo/NHPR Staff

Football faces increasing criticism as mounting evidence shows the dangers of concussions, in particular undiagnosed concussions.

A new telehealth initiative at Dartmouth College aims to eliminate those undiagnosed concussions by bringing neurosurgeons to the sidelines--via robot.

On the sidelines of the Dartmouth/Penn football game, neurosurgeon Robert Singer watches carefully.

"A lot of these hits are shoulder hits. What we’re looking for are direct head to head kind of contact, that type of thing."

Have Youth Sports Become Too Intense?

Aug 25, 2014
Amherst Patriots / Flickr/CC

There’s a lot of concern these days that an ethic of winning at all costs, promoted by over-zealous parents or coaches, is ruining youth athletics. And kids are paying the price, from sports injuries at ever-younger ages, to constant practice that cuts into family time. But now, some adults are crying “foul” and calling for change.

Michael May via flickr Creative Commons, amazon.com, Rui Costa via flickr Creative Commons and via sistersparrow.com

In 1936 18-year-old Marty Glickman was one of the fastest sprinters in the country, earning him a spot on the U.S. Olympic team and a trip to the Berlin Games. Today on Word of Mouth, we have the story of how he was removed from the competition to appease Hitler and how he then became a legendary sports broadcaster. Then lessons in science with The Art of Tinkering and a conversation about how elements were named.
Finally, Producer Zach Nugent spoke with front-woman Arleigh Kincheloe of the band Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds. Their new album is called Fight.

Listen to the whole show and click Read more for individual segments.

This show originally aired on 3.27.14. 

Austin Cowan NHPR

Sagamore-Hampton Golf Club in North Hampton has all the characteristics of a golf course. It has manicured fairways, rows of golf carts and a pristine clubhouse. Its patrons are all dressed in golfing garb, awaiting their turn to tee off down the first fairway. However, there is something a little odd about this course, something that doesn’t quite fit.

Amidst the traditional golfers are young kids holding soccer balls. They are here for a different game called FootGolf. That’s right, FootGolf, a sport that combines golf and soccer.

Austin Cowan NHPR

New Hampshire’s finest amateur golfers took to Stonebridge Country Club in Goffstown this week for the 111th New Hampshire State Amateur Championships.

The golfers in the tournament, which started on Monday,  are a mix of fearless youngsters and seasoned veterans. The final will be contested Saturday between Damon Salo, a Johnson and Wales University golfer from New Ipswich, and Joe Leavitt from the Atkinson Resort and Country Club, who won the tournament in 2012.

gargudojr via Flickr Creative Commons

With more than a quarter of the players born outside the US, professional baseball is the UN of American pro sports. We take a look at a position crucial to a team’s success:  the interpreter…and how the job requires more than mere translation. Plus, France’s government is banning English words like ‘fast-food’ and ‘hashtag’ in the name of cultural preservation…we find out why the words are unlikely to disappear from the vernacular anytime soon. And, Sue Miller speaks about her new book, The Arsonist.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Sarah Thomas

Red Sox vs. Yankees. Coke vs. Pepsi. Facebook vs. Twitter.  And now – Chuckster’s Family Fun Park vs. Rocky Gorge 4 Seasons Golf Fairway.

Disc Golf: No Collared Shirts Required

Jul 11, 2014
Austin Cowan NHPR

Nestled deep in the woods of Canterbury, NH is a special type of golf course. No golf carts, clubs or balls can be found here. Bright polos and pastel shorts are left at the country club as well. Here, at Top O’ The Hill, disc golf is the game of choice.

For those that have never heard of the sport, think golf...but with a disc. It's that simple. Be careful to use the word "disc," however, never "Frisbee." This, I’m told, is seen as a slur in the disc world.

various brennemans via Flickr Creative Commons

Prove it, innate, survival of the fittest, organic… scientific terminology is part of our everyday language, but are we using the terms correctly? Today we’re testing the theory of misusing scientific terms. And, with the state breaking ground on a new women’s prison next month, we’ll consider whether the specific needs of female inmates can be addressed by re-thinking prison design. Then, mental illness creates a stigma that is almost impossible to erase, even for sports celebrities. We wonder: why isn’t Delonte West in the NBA?

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Made of Tennis
Michael Gilliam / Flickr Creative Commons

The Waterville Valley Tennis Center is once again hosting the annual New Hampshire Open, scheduled for July 18 to July 20.  The 10,000 New Hampshire Open Tennis Championships is set on the 18 red clay court complex of the tennis center.  Athletes include top ranked New England and collegiate players who play the eastern summer tennis circuit.  Play begins the afternoon of Friday, the 18th, and continues Saturday with singles and doubles. Semi-finals and finals are on July 20.    

Austin Cowan NHPR

New Hampshire’s finest high school football players took to Grappone Stadium on Saturday in the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock All Star Game.

The game, a last hurrah for graduating seniors, is a way for New Hampshire youth to give back. In its three year history, the contest between the best players representing the east and west regions of the state has raised $752,000 for the hospital, said Nick Vailas, the founder of the game.

David Monti, Race Results Weekly

Dartmouth College’s Abbey D’Agostino is turning pro now that her celebrated collegiate running career has come to an end. In four years at Dartmouth D’Agostino became one of the Ivy League’s all-time most accomplished. To learn more about her career and what lies ahead, I spoke to David Monti, editor and publisher of the New York based Race Results Weekly:

This is an athlete that took a lot of people by surprise. What were the expectations when she first came to Dartmouth and what did she end up accomplishing?

If you have World Cup fever, you’ll know Brazil and Croatia kick off the tournament Thursday. Even if you don’t have the fever; even if the brouhaha over Landon Donovan last month didn’t register; even if you have only the faintest understanding of who David Beckham is; you know that the U.S. has never been a favorite in the sport of international soccer.

christopher.woo via Flickr Creative Commons

We spoke with Freakonomics co-author Stephen Dubner about three issues that have been dominating headlines lately. In case you’ve missed them and need to catch up quickly, we’ve compiled the highlights so you can be a champion of serious water-cooler discussions.

The major take-away? Dubner urges you to think like a freak, and to listen to more public radio.

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