Sports

NH News
3:48 pm
Fri November 30, 2012

UNH Football Looking To Make Playoff Run

Credit Jimmy Emerson / Flick/Creative Commons

On Saturday, UNH’s football team will travel to Spartanburg, South Carolina to take on the Wofford College Terriers in a second-round playoff game.

It’s the ninth straight year the Wildcats have made the FCS (formerly called Division 1-AA) playoffs, the longest active streak in the nation.

Head Coach Sean McDonnell says it’s the character of his players, as much as their talent, that keeps the Wildcats winning.

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The Exchange
10:00 am
Sun November 18, 2012

One Granite State Doctor “Calls Foul” Against Football

Paul Butler is a former football player himself, but says the evidence now shows the game is too dangerous for young people and their developing brains.  Butler called for a ban on the sport in his hometown.  But many say his concerns go overboard and that it’s a hard sell to interfere with America’s second favorite pastime.  We'll hear from both sides of this debate.

Guests

TBA

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NH News
5:00 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

A Profile of Kathrine Switzer

Forty-five years ago, on the eve of the Women’s liberation movement Kathrine Switzer made history by becoming the first women to ever ‘officially run’ the Boston Marathon.  But it was four photographs taken of Switzer’s famous altercation with a race director that day would spark a revolution not only in women’s running, but also in women’s rights.

Switzer was in New Hampshire this week to give the keynote address at the annual Women Building Community Luncheon in Manchester put on by the United Way of New Hampshire, the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation and the Women’s Fund”

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Word of Mouth
10:04 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Pedaling off the Pounds

Sam Evans-Brown

A lot of Americans are struggling to lose a whole lot of weight, and they try all kinds of crazy things.

Ernest Gagnon — a man from Billerica, Mass. — decided to shed pounds by getting into the often intense, high-adrenaline sport of cyclocross: racing road bikes on obstacle courses.

Two years ago, Gagnon tipped the scales at 570 pounds. He was depressed and embarrassed to leave the house.

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Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

The World Cup of Sandwich, NH

Credit Leo Greene

If you’ve spent any time in the town of Sandwich, New Hampshire, you may have picked up on its eclectic mix of preserved antiquity and progressiveness, with old clean-walled farmhouses occupied by inventors, artists, even a locally-grown internet service provider. Sandwich may be yesterday on the outside, but it’s tomorrow on the in.  As Sean Hurley reports, this dichotomy finds an unusual expression on the town soccer field a few days before the annual Sandwich Fair. And while many towns see carnies as an invading force, to residents of this town, they’re welcome competitors.

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All Things Considered
5:31 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

I Choose To Run: When Politics and Athletes Intersect

Quite a few presidential and vice presidential hopefuls have crossed the finish line in marathons.
jayneandd via Flickr/Creative Commons - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jayneandd/4450623309/in/photostream/

This past weekend in New Hampshire was full of two things that NHPR's Keith Shields follows very closely: politics and marathons.

Shields is executive producer of The Exchange and a 27 time marathoner. He joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to – pardon the pun – run through the intersection of marathon culture and political culture, up to and including this election.

NH News
6:00 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

A Step by Step on Racewalking

Nashua Racewalker and 1984 Olympics Qualifier Bob Keating demonstrates his sport

(sound of walking)

The track at Nashua North high school on any given afternoon has a few joggers doing laps, sprinters running intervals, even a hurdler practicing his jumps…and then there’s Bob Keating, who stands out a bit. The sixty five year old race-walker and one time Olympic trials qualifier is pumping his arms, his hips are swaying wide and as everyone else bounces, Keating seems to glide around the perimeter of the track.

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All Things Considered
6:15 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

NHPR's In-House Marathoner Weighs In On Olympic Track and Field

The "RUN" sculpture at London's Olympic Park.
The Department for Culture, Media and Sport via Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/thedcms/7707038092/

Millions of Americans have been following the Olympics in London, and NHPR staffers are no exception. But one of our colleagues is watching with a more seasoned eye – Keith Shields is executive producer of The Exchange, but he’s also a 27-time marathoner who's currently training for an Iron Man triathlon in Quebec.

He tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the races he's been following, London's history in shaping the modern marathon, and whether athletes watch Olympic competition any differently than the rest of us.

NH News
4:00 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

The Mile Still Matters To Track & Field

From ryunrunning.com

Track and field has a numbers problem. As in, there are just too many of them. The 60, 26.2, 4-by-8, 2-oh-3, 5, 8, 10k…

Back in the 1950s, there was one number that mattered.

"I think there are only a handful of achievements like breaking 4 minutes for the first time, in any sport, that comes close to what Roger Bannister has done." 

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Word of Mouth
9:07 am
Tue July 17, 2012

A Horse of Exactly the Same Color

Photo by eXtensionHorses via Flickr Creative Commons

Produced with Zach Nugent

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Word of Mouth
11:24 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Skating on Ice Made by the Sun

(Photo by Sarah Reynolds)

As summer hits Cape Cod, out come the fishing rods, sailboats, and…. Hockey pucks?  In Falmouth, Massachusetts, youth hockey leagues and recreational skaters are carving up the ice in a brand new ice rink this month – one that’s powered by summer sunlight.  Independent producer Sarah Reynolds has the story.

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The Exchange
11:22 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Big Spending on Youth Sports

From toddler gyms to travel leagues, the author of a new book says companies are increasingly targeting kids, creating a highly profitable youth sports economy.  And the effects can be damaging, he says, leading families to overspend and kids to lose sight of the life lessons that sports can bring. We’ll take a look at this trend – its causes and effects.

Guests:

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
5:33 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

A Newbie Tries To Squeeze Into The U.S. Olympic Pool

Superstar swimmers Michael Phelps (left) and Ryan Lochte are versatile and talented, making spots on the U.S. men's Olympic team scarce. The pair took silver and gold, respectively, in the 200-meter individual medley at last summer's World Championships.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Across the country, swimmers are putting in their final laps before this month's Olympic trials. For many, the dream of making the U.S. swim team has been what gets them out of bed for a predawn practice. But on the men's side of the pool, the superstars of swimming often leave little room for anyone else.

At a recent swim practice in Nashville, Tenn., Dakota Hodgson, 20, puts in laps. And speed-walking to keep up, stopwatch in hand, is his gray-haired coach and father, Charlie Hodgson.

Charlie calls out Dakota's time: "29.24."

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NPR News
4:31 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

The Road To London Is Paved With Olympic Gaffes

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

The road to any big event, be it a family reunion, a graduation, or the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, is often pockmarked with screw-ups, flubs, and insensitive oversights. Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish catalog a few of the gaffes leading up to the London games, including torch flame-outs, missing hurdles, and the resurrection of the apartheid-era South African anthem.

NPR News
4:30 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

I Will Not Have Another: Derby Winner To Retire

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'll Have Another will not have a shot at the Triple Crown. His trainer noticed inflammation in the horse's leg, so the winner of the Kentucky Derby and Preakness will not race in tomorrow's Belmont Stakes. In fact, he's being retired from racing altogether.

NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now. And, Mike, what more have you learned about this injury?

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