Standardized Tests

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New Hampshire students will be introduced to new standardized tests this spring.

In recent years, New Hampshire has worked with a consortium of other states to create its standardized tests - what's known as the Smarter Balanced and the NECAP system.

Now, with the help of an assessment company, the state is crafting its own test, the New Hampshire Statewide Assessment System, or SAS.

Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut says the new system will be more tailored to New Hampshire and it will take significantly less time for students to complete.

NHPR

Before the new school year, we hear from several teachers from across the state, who work in different grade levels, about their hopes, concerns and goals for the upcoming year, from teaching the fundamentals to mandated testing, to creating a positive classroom climate. 


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New Hampshire is getting the green light to continue a pilot program aimed at reducing standardized testing in schools.

The U.S. Department of Education on Thursday announced a one-year extension for New Hampshire's PACE program, which stands for Performance Assessment for Competency Education.

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It's a growing group nationally: parents who refuse to let their children take statewide assessments such as those aligned with Common Core. Now, New Hampshire lawmakers are considering a bill allowing parents to do the same without fear of penalty, arguing these tests do more harm than good. But test-backers say they provide valuable information.

Tomorrow, eleventh graders in New Hampshire’s public schools will take the SAT as a statewide assessment for the first time.

Last year the Executive Council approved a request from the state Department of Education to use the SAT as the statewide assessment for eleventh graders. That means eleventh graders in public and charter schools will take the SAT during the school day, free of charge.

Previously, students who wanted to take the SAT did so outside of the normal school day and had to pay a fee of around $50 dollars.

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New Hampshire education officials have received permission to replace the 11th grade statewide assessment test with the College Board's SAT exam next spring.

The Executive Council on Wednesday approved the Department of Education's request to offer the SAT at no cost for all 11th-graders. The SAT, widely used by colleges in evaluating applicants, typically costs more than $50.

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

New Hampshire’s scores on the latest federally mandated standardized test – the Smarter Balanced – were released Thursday.

The headline: Fewer than half of the state’s students were judged to be meeting grade level benchmarks in math, though they are doing somewhat better in English.

When the Department of Education released its latest round of state-level reading and math scores this week, it was cause for cheer in New Hampshire. The state ranked in the top two or three states in every category and grade-level tests.

Those kind of high marks have been common in New Hampshire for years. But a recent report suggests the state’s status as one of the nation’s top test-takers should come down a few notches. 

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The latest batch of national assessment tests shows New Hampshire students remaining among the highest achievers in math and reading.

The 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress shows the average scores for reading in New Hampshire holding steady compared to 2013 for both fourth graders and eighth graders. For the younger group, only one state had a higher average score than New Hampshire. For eighth graders, New Hampshire was tied with four other states at the top of the list.

An Update on No Child Left Behind

Jul 24, 2015
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Fourteen years after the implementation of the education program, the federal government attempts to rework education standards from this controversial act. We'll look at how Common Core standards and NCLB overlap, or differ, and what changes this could bring to our school systems.

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Governor Hassan signed House Bill 323 into law Wednesday, giving schools the choice to give the SAT or ACT to high school juniors in order to meet federal testing requirements.

Previously, all students in the state were required to take the Smarter Balanced Assessment to meet the requirements of No Child Left Behind. 

Like in New Hampshire, states across the country are rolling out new assessments this spring aligned with the Common Core.

But whether parents have the right opt out of those tests can vary state by state.

A study released earlier this month found that while some states have clear guidelines on whether children are required to participate, other states’ policies are still evolving.

Julie Rowland is a researcher for the Education Commission of the States.

Last week, New Hampshire's third through eighth graders and one high school grade began taking a new standardized test: the Smarter Balanced.

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You hear a lot of grumbling these days that students and teachers are overwhelmed by testing regimes aimed at keeping districts accountable.  We talk with an author who says there are better ways to track of how are kids and educators are doing.

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