State employees association

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The New Hampshire Liquor Commission is seeking to ban the president of one of the state’s largest labor unions from entering any state liquor store for the next six months.

The effort is an escalation in an ongoing dispute between the state agency and some of its workers over the proper handling of large all-cash transactions and allegations of bootlegging.

Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr/Creative Commons

A long-festering dispute between New Hampshire Liquor Commission management and the union employees who staff the state-run stores erupted in front-page headlines this week.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 8, 2018

Jun 7, 2018

We look at the public feud between the largest state employees union and the top managers of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission.  Are state liquor store employees at risk in high-volume cash sales?  Lakes Region residents consider possible future plans for the former Laconia State School.   And what to do with the troublesome bear pardoned by Governor Sununu last year, now rummaging again in backyards in the Upper Valley.

GUESTS:

NHPR File Photo

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court says a labor relations board was wrong to dismiss a union complaint saying the Community College System of New Hampshire should have compensated an adjunct professor for tutoring.

NHPR Staff

The new state budget may be in effect, but one issue still unresolved is a contract for state employees. Governor Sununu says he’d welcome a deal but it may not happen.

Negotiations between the Sununu administration and the five unions representing state workers haven’t been easy. 

The State Employees Association, the largest public sector union in the state, is filing an unfair labor practice complaint against the Governor’s office for what it calls a “refusal” to negotiate.

www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/

  The acting head of the Department of Health and Human Services is set to meet with state workers this week.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

The Senate’s top budget writer says it’s unclear whether the final version of the state budget will include funding for a new labor agreement with state employees.

    Republican Jeanie Forrester of Meredith says there’s been little discussion in the Senate of the deal, which would give state workers a 2 percent raise in each of the next two years at a cost of about $12 million dollars.

New Hampshire Senate
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The head of the largest state employees union is urging the New Hampshire Senate to fund a new two-year labor deal with the state.

Neither the House budget nor the one approved by the Senate Finance Committee includes the $12 million dollar cost of the deal, which would give state employees 2 percent raises each of the next two years and better dental and life insurance benefits.

The New Hampshire State Employees Union says workers have ratified a new two-year contract covering about 9,000 employees.

SEA/SEIU Local 1984 officials say the contract was approved by 95 percent of union members.

The contract features 2 percent raises each of the next two years and better dental and life insurance benefits.

Changes in health care provisions, in turn, will save the state $10 million over the course of two years.

Courtesy of S.E.A.

The State Employees Association, the state’s largest public union, has elected a new president.

  Rich Gulla who works for the State Liquor Commission unseated incumbent Diana Lacey by a difference of just four votes during Sunday’s convention.

Gulla says he’s excited about representing the interests of SEA members who he says are overworked and underpaid.

“Because now you’ve got one person perhaps doing the job of two or three because of cut-backs.”

State workers have ratified a tentative contract agreement with New Hampshire that requires workers to pay a deductible for the first time, but shares health plan savings with the workers in exchange.

NHPR Staff

Contract negotiation between the Hassan administration and the state employees association are heading into a fact finding stage. The move comes eight months into contract talks and after 4 days of mediation failed to produce agreement. State employees association president Diana Lacey says the Hassan administration has been unwilling to provide proof to back up its claims on contracts costs.

"I am not necessarily willing to say that I think it’s bad faith, but the closest I could get to that is to say they are in a different league now."