storm damage

Jennifer Shea via Facebook

Last weekend’s rainstorm did more damage than officials initially assessed. On Thursday evening, twenty local roads remained closed. 

By Wednesday, cities and towns in Grafton County had upped their flood damage tally from $4 million to nearly $12 million. Two state roads, 116 South in Easton and 25A in Orford, will likely remain closed through the coming weekend, although local traffic can access residences in the interim.

On Thursday, Federal Emergency Management Agency officials began a tour of storm damage in the state.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu and other public safety officials toured damage sites in Grafton County on Monday following Saturday evening's major storms.

Dozens of roads remain closed, with preliminary estimates of the clean up effort topping $4 million.

Many of the hardest hit areas remain inaccessible, so to get a better view, Sununu used a helicopter.

Floods On The Rise

Sep 23, 2013
thisreidwrites via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s a national trend: torrential rain that wipes away roads, homes, and lives. New Hampshire has also seen an increase in these storms, including this summer, resulting in a disaster declaration by the President. Officials, meanwhile, have been working to not only fix the damage from these storms but rebuild in ways that can better withstand the next one.

GUESTS:

Figuring that storms are as inevitable as death and taxes a North Country planning group will be looking at ways to minimize the impact of bad weather on the economy.

“You know we can’t predict the weather but maybe we can be prepared for what it might bring us,” said Patricia Garvin, the economic development coordinator for the North Country Council.